What’s with the WORLD

MDTI-WA-2021-0164
Date: 16 April 2021

PORTUGAL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 16, 2021

Entry is only permitted for travelers from EU-associated states, as well as Australia, China, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, and Thailand. Travelers from EU/EEA countries with an incidence rate of over 150 cases per 100,000 people may only make essential trips to Portugal. Travel from other countries remains prohibited except in limited essential cases, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting for essential work or study. All permitted arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours before boarding. Travelers arriving from countries with COVID-19 incidence rates of over 500 per 100,000 inhabitants must also self-isolate for 14 days on arrival.

All flights to and from the UK and Brazil remain suspended until at least the end of April 15. Only humanitarian and repatriation flights will be permitted. All permitted travelers from Brazil, as well as from South Africa, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival.


MDTI-WA-2021-0163
Date: 16 April 2021

NORWAY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 16, 2021

Generally, only Norwegian citizens and legal residents are allowed to enter the country; however, exemptions are in place for close family members of Norwegian residents, transport workers, individuals in transit, and foreigners who work within critical social functions. All travelers, including Norwegian citizens and residents, need to provide a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken no more than 24 hours prior to arrival; persons arriving by plane may take the test no more than 24 hours before the scheduled departure time for the first part of the flight. Upon arrival, travelers must take a rapid coronavirus test at the airport or border and wait at the test station until the result is known.

Authorities require all arrivals, including Norwegian nationals and permanent residents, returning from nonessential travel abroad to quarantine at designated hotels for 10 days. The quarantine period may be shortened if a negative COVID-19 test result is received no earlier than seven days after entry into the country. There are a limited number of exceptions where arrivals will not be required to quarantine. In addition, business travelers who are able to document that their employer is able to provide a suitable alternative accommodation may be exempt from the hotel quarantine.

All permitted travelers from high-risk areas must register with authorities within 72 hours before arrival. As of April 15 only Greenland, the Faroe Islands, and the Finnish hospital districts of Central Ostrobothnia, North Ostrobothnia, South Ostrobothnia, Kainuu, Lappi, Lansi-Pohja, are not considered high-risk areas. Cross-border commuters from Sweden and Finland are permitted to enter Norway without the need to isolate provided they take a COVID-19 test every seven days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0162
Date: 16 April 2021

BELGIUM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 16, 2021

Authorities in Belgium will start a phased easing of COVID-19 restrictions; starting April 19, the ban on nonessential travel to and from Belgium will be lifted. All travelers returning from a red-zone country will have to quarantine for at least seven days, and will be required to get a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on days one and seven of their quarantine. As of April 15, most countries in EU including France, Germany, Spain, Netherlands, and Italy are considered red zone countries.

All permitted arrivals staying in Belgium for more than 48 hours must complete a Passenger Locator Form within the 48 hours before arrival, and possess a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours before departing for Belgium.

Belgian officials also enforce additional quarantine protocols for arrivals from the UK, South Africa, and South America. Travelers from these regions must complete a 10-day quarantine and take PCR tests on the first and seventh days of the quarantine.


MDTI-WA-2021-0161
Date: 16 April 2021

GREECE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 16, 2021

Authorities reportedly plan to ease quarantine requirements for international arrivals from EEA-associated states and select other locations from April 19. While precise details have not been confirmed, arrivals from these locations – which will include Serbia, the UAE, the UK, and the US – will not be required to self-isolate if they can provide evidence of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Authorities are hoping that the epidemiological situation will permit Greece to largely reopen to international tourists from May 14.

As of April 15, entry remains prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exceptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Russia, Thailand, the UAE, and the UK are also exempt from the ban. All international arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for seven days upon arrival; Israeli travelers with proof of full vaccination are exempt from the requirement to self-isolate.

All incoming travelers must complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form; individuals will be subject to COVID-19 tests upon landing based on their Passenger Locator Form information. All persons entering from the UAE must submit to a rapid antigen test upon arrival. Travelers entering from the UK must currently submit to a rapid antigen test upon arrival, self-isolate for seven days, and take a PCR test after their isolation period.


MDTI-WA-2021-0160
Date: 15 April 2021

VIETNAM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 15, 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Vietnam. Exceptions are in place for foreign experts, investors, managers, skilled workers, and resident diplomats, among others. All passengers must quarantine at centralized facilities for 14 days upon entering the country. Authorities may make limited exceptions for special diplomatic cases; it is unclear whether exemptions are also in place for individuals entering Vietnam under bilateral travel arrangements.

Inbound commercial flights remain suspended until further notice. Charter flights may operate on a case-by-case basis to transport Vietnamese citizens and foreign nationals who are allowed to enter the country. Authorities have banned all flights from South Africa and the UK due to new COVID-19 variants in those two countries. Officials require people who can still enter Vietnam to test negative for COVID-19 within five days before the travel date.


MDTI-WA-2021-0159
Date: 15 April 2021

SWITZERLAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 15, 2021

Under most circumstances, only citizens and residents of EEA countries, in addition to Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, may enter Switzerland. All individuals arriving by plane must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the previous 72 hours; all individuals arriving by plane, train, bus or boat are required to fill out an entry form.

Additionally, all individuals who have spent time in locations designated as high-risk within 10 days prior to arrival must fill out an entry form prior to arrival, have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within the previous 72 hours, and self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. The self-isolation period can be ended early following a negative COVID-19 test result taken on or after day seven of the quarantine period. For an English-language list of countries designated as high-risk, click https://www.bag.admin.ch/bag/en/home/krankheiten/ausbrueche-epidemien-pandemien/aktuelle-ausbrueche-epidemien/novel-cov/empfehlungen-fuer-reisende/liste.html#858610174.

The quarantine requirement does not apply to essential individuals traveling for business or medical purposes or transit travelers who have spent fewer than 24 hours in a high-risk country or territory.


MDTI-WA-2021-0158
Date: 15 April 2021

GERMANY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 15, 2021

Authorities have extended an existing ban on direct passenger transport with “virus-variant” areas – locations deemed to carry an increased risk of infection from a variant strain of COVID-19 – until at least April 28. As of April 14, Brazil, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries, including South Africa, remain designated virus-variant areas. Entry from these areas is limited to German nationals and residents, as well as certain essential workers. Individuals not traveling for essential work are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Border officials are conducting random checks on private vehicles entering the country from virus-variant areas that share a border with Germany.

Authorities have designated various countries and regions as “high incidence,” “risk,” or “virus variant” depending on local disease activity. For a full English-language list of locations designated by the German government as virus-variant, risk, and high-incidence areas, click c.

Most travel from outside the EEA, with the exception of that from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, is prohibited. Exemptions are in place for EU nationals or residents and their family members, individuals carrying out essential work, or individuals traveling for urgent reasons. Since March 28, all travelers arriving in Germany by air must present a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within the previous 48 hours; originally, only travelers arriving from designated risk areas were required to provide such a test.

Tighter entry restrictions remain in place for travelers from the high-incidence areas including, Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, Czech Republic, Turkey, and UAE, starting as of April 14 due to concerns over the COVID-19 incidence rate in that country. Authorities have classified the Netherlands as a high incidence area. All travelers who have spent any time in a high-incidence area in the last 10 days must self-isolate for at least 10 days in addition to presenting a negative COVID-19 test result before departure for Germany.


MDTI-WA-2021-0157
Date: 15 April 2021

POLAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 15, 2021

Incoming travel is permitted from EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as from Australia, Belarus, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, and the UK. Most travel from other countries is prohibited with certain exceptions in place for students and essential workers, among other groups.

All travelers arriving from the Schengen area must present a negative COVID-19 test result dated no more than 48 hours prior to arrival; results from either a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or an antigen test are acceptable. Those who do not possess a negative test will be required to self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. All travelers arriving from outside the Schengen area must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival; travelers may end their quarantine by providing a negative COVID-19 test taken within 48 hours after arrival. Travelers who have been issued a certificate of vaccination with a vaccine that has been authorized in the European Union are exempt from quarantine.

Entry checks remain in place on land borders with Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. The border with Russia can be crossed only at the Bezledy and Grzechotki border crossings. The border with Belarus may be crossed at the Kuznica, Bobrowniki, and Terespol crossings, while the border with Ukraine may be crossed at the Dorohusk, Korczowa, Hrebenne, Medyka, and Budomierz crossings.


MDTI-WA-2021-0156
Date: 14 April 2021

RUSSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 14, 2021

Authorities in Russia will limit flights with Turkey and suspend flights with Tanzania April 15-June 1 due to the high incidence rate of COVID-19 in those countries. Authorities will allow two commercial flights per week between Moscow and Istanbul, repatriation flights, charter flights, and flights carrying workers for the development of the Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant in Turkey’s Mersin Province. Only repatriation flights will be permitted with Tanzania.

Authorities previously extended the suspension of all commercial flights with the UK until 23:59 April 16 in order to prevent the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 active in that country. Most categories of travelers from the UK may not enter Russia except for diplomats and persons holding special visas, such as Highly Qualified Specialist visas. Those travelers arriving from the UK who are permitted to enter must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Russia; aircrews are exempt from this restriction.

Aside from the UK flight suspension, international flights are operating between Russia and around 30 countries, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, France, Germany, Italy, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Netherlands, Serbia, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, and the UAE. However, the availability of flights is still dependent on COVID-19 restrictions in destination countries. Additionally, flights with low demand could be canceled or merged with other scheduled services. Foreign air passengers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test performed no more than 72 hours prior to their departure for Russia; Russian citizens must produce a negative COVID-19 test within three days upon arrival or self-isolate for 14 days. Foreigners are not allowed entry for tourism purposes.


MDTI-WA-2021-0155
Date: 14 April 2021

FRANCE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 14, 2021

Authorities in France have issued orders to suspend all flights with Brazil effective April 13 until further notice due to the spread of a COVID-19 variant strain in that country. It remains unclear as to whether cargo flights will be exempt.

Nonessential travel from Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and the UK has been allowed to resume. Travel remains suspended to and from all other non-EU-associated countries; limited exceptions are granted for essential travel. All international arrivals must provide a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure. In addition, arrivals must provide a negative result from a PCR test and complete a travel declaration form. Crossborder workers and freight transporters are exempt from the testing requirement. Permitted travelers arriving from outside the EU travel zone are also requested to self-isolate for seven days on arrival and take a second COVID-19 test at the end of the self-isolation period.


MDTI-WA-2021-0154
Date: 14 April 2021

SPAIN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 14, 2021

Authorities in Spain are maintaining restrictions imposed to combat the spread of COVID-19 as of April 13. Previously officials extended a ban on nonessential travel from countries outside the EU and Schengen Area until at least April 30. Under this directive,most international travelers arriving from outside the EEA, except for those from Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, and Thailand, remain prohibited from entering Spain. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, healthcare workers, and freight transport workers, as well as other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons.

The Spanish government has extended the ban on entry by travelers from South Africa and Brazil through at least April 27; citizens and residents of Spain and Andorra are exempt. Freight, transporters, aircrews, and persons in transit whose final destination is a non-Schengen country are also exempt. A similar ban on entry from the UK was lifted March 30, though as a non-EU country, entry from the UK remains restricted to limited permitted exceptions as detailed above.

All permitted travelers arriving by air must fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document can be submitted in either electronic or paper format and must be in Spanish, English, French, or German; it can be submitted in other languages only if accompanied by a certified Spanish translation. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.


MDTI-WA-2021-0153
Date: 14 April 2021

HONG KONG – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 14, 2021

The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have not visited elsewhere for 21 days. Individuals arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints. The government plans to expand the program to residents in other parts of mainland China in the coming weeks. Officials have barred entry for people who have stayed in designated extremely high-risk countries Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours within 21 days of departure. However, officials are permitting residents to return from the UK on select flights April 21 and 28; commercial flights from the UK are likely to resume from early May. Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, the UAE, and the US as very high-risk areas. The government will also classify Egypt as very high risk from April 20. Returning residents arriving from these locations and permitted travelers from extremely high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure.

Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to quarantine at a hotel for 21 days. All passengers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All entrants must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials require travelers from Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore to quarantine for 14 days, but they must self-monitor their health for an additional seven days and undergo COVID-19 testing on day 19 after arrival. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine, provided they test negative for COVID-19.

Hong Kong is maintaining quarantine measures for crews of aircraft and maritime vessels indefinitely. Under these requirements, ships without cargo cannot exchange crews. On other ships, workers are no longer allowed to enter the territory and must travel directly to the airport after disembarking. Inbound ship crews and flight crew members must obtain a negative COVID-19 test result within 48 hours of departure for Hong Kong. Both airlines and shipping companies must arrange point-to-point transport for employees to limit interaction with the public.


MDTI-WA-2021-0152
Date: 14 April 2021

THAILAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 14, 2021

Officials have reduced the quarantine requirements for all arrivals to 10 days since April 1. Authorities still require passengers coming from Botswana, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe to undergo 14 days of on-arrival quarantine. Arrivals from all countries must obtain a Certificate of Entry from a Thai embassy if they are foreigners, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip, and provide evidence of a quarantine facility booking.

Limited inbound tourist flights are operating. Cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft remain operational. Authorities are allowing travelers from 56 locations to enter Thailand without visas. The 56 locations are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Foreigners can transit at local airports with protocols in place.

Authorities intend to allow vaccinated tourists to enter Phuket without on-arrival quarantine requirements from July 1 as part of its further reopening plan. Officials may adjust or delay the rules at short notice due to changes in local or international COVID-19 activity.


MDTI-WA-2021-0151
Date: 13 April 2021

NETHERLANDS – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 13, 2021

Travel to the Netherlands is generally only permitted for residents of European Economic Area (EEA) or Schengen-associated countries, as well as those of the Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Officials prohibit most travel from other countries. Exemptions, however, are in place for healthcare workers, people traveling to seek medical attention, persons traveling for urgent family reasons, staff traveling to or from British or Dutch drilling platforms, air or sea crews traveling in the performance of their work, transiting EEA or Schengen Area residents, and returning Dutch nationals and residents.

All permitted travelers must possess either a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 24 hours prior to boarding transport or a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival in the Netherlands coupled with a negative rapid COVID-19 test taken no more than 24 hours prior to boarding. Authorities will not accept results from self-administered tests. Transit passengers are also subject to this requirement. Additionally, all travelers arriving via air or sea must fill out a declaration form prior to entry and self-isolate for 10 days on arrival; this can be shortened by taking a COVID-19 test on or after day five of the self-isolation period. These measures do not apply to individuals arriving from Iceland, Sint Maarten, Saba, Sint Eustatius, Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Portugal, and Thailand; additional exceptions are possible for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats.

Authorities have extended a ban on flights with South Africa, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela until at least April 15 due to concerns related to variant strains of COVID-19 in those countries. Air freight transport is exempt from the travel ban.


MDTI-WA-2021-0150
Date: 13 April 2021

MEXICO – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 APRIL 2021

Authorities in Mexico maintain the country’s northern and southern land borders closure to all nonessential travel through at least April 21. The border closure with the US has been in place since March 2020 under a mutual agreement between the two countries; the border closure with Belize and Guatemala took effect March 19, following a pandemic-related review. The ban on recreational boat travel will also remain in effect. Cargo transport across the land borders is exempt.

International air travel is continuing. Mexico is not enforcing any mandatory quarantine requirements for arrivals; however, travelers may be subject to health screenings at the airport and those presenting symptoms of COVID-19 may be subject to additional health checks and/or quarantine.

Authorities could tighten or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.


MDTI-WA-2021-0149
Date: 13 April 2021

MALAYSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 13, 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and maritime vessel crew members.

Malaysia may allow limited cross-border travel with Singapore for business and official purposes. Under the Reciprocal Green Lane (RGL) scheme, individuals may make short trips from Singapore and be exempt from standard quarantine requirements for arrivals. Such travelers must present approval letters from immigration authorities and a company or government agency in Malaysia, obtain visas if required, and test for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and upon arrival. They must also comply with a controlled itinerary for the first 14 days and adhere to contact tracing measures. Additionally, the Periodic Commuting Arrangement (PCA) allows travelers to make multiple-entry visits through land border crossings at Woodlands or Tuas for 90-day stays; however, persons traveling under the PCA must isolate at government-designated facilities for at least one week. Travelers can leave the quarantine sites upon testing negative for COVID-19.


MDTI-WA-2021-0148
Date: 12 April 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 11, 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials permit partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomats to enter without prior government consent. Authorities also allow partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country. Authorities have banned all travelers with a 14-day travel history to India until April 28 after an increase in positive COVID-19 cases from the country. The government allows entry for some critical workers on special visas provided companies demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. Authorities require people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities require most inbound international passengers to test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours of departure. Exemptions are in place for travelers from Australia, Antarctica, and some Pacific island nations and territories, including the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Palau, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. Exceptions are also in effect for passengers who cannot receive a test due to medical reasons or previously recovered from COVID-19 but still return a positive test; in both instances, individuals must obtain a medical certificate certifying the information to enter the country. Authorities will accept negative COVID-19 test results for passengers whose flights get delayed 24 hours or less. Vaccinated travelers must still get tested under the new regulation and provide a medical certificate if they test positive for COVID-19. Passengers that do not meet pre-departure testing requirements may face a fine of up to NZD 1,000 (USD 723).

Most inbound passengers must quarantine at government-designated facilities for 14 days. Entrants from most locations must undergo a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival and on days three and 12 of quarantine and receive a negative result before departing facilities. Vessel crews arriving in New Zealand must spend 14 days in quarantine unless they had been on the vessel for 28 days before docking at the port. Travelers from Niue are exempt from quarantine. Officials will also permit quarantine-free travel from Australia beginning 23:59 April 18, provided travelers have not been to any other location for 14 days before arrival. Passengers will have to travel on designated “green flights” between the two countries to be eligible. Authorities will treat each Australian state and territory separately, and officials could temporarily suspend travel from specific states or require travelers from affected areas to quarantine if an outbreak occurs.

Officials have instituted a quarantine fee structure for inbound travelers. Most travelers allowed into the country will have to pay NZD 3,100 (USD 2,180) for the first person, NZD 950 (USD 668) for each additional adult, and NZD 475 (USD 340) per additional child. Children under three years of age are exempt if staying with another person. New Zealand citizens, residence visa holders, and Australian citizens and permanent residents who typically reside in New Zealand are exempt from costs if they departed the country before Aug. 11, 2020, and intend to return home longer than 90 days. Temporary visa holders are also exempt from fees if they were residents in New Zealand as of March 19, 2020, and were outside the country before that date. Authorities have increased quarantine fees for permitted critical workers and most short-term permitted entrants – including partners of citizens and residents and student, work, and limited visa holders. The government charges NZD 5,520 (USD 3,881) for the first individual, NZD 2,990 (USD 2,102) for each additional adult, and NZD 1,610 (USD 1,132) per additional child. Companies can cover the quarantine costs for inbound critical workers.


MDTI-WA-2021-0147
Date: 12 April 2021

SOUTH KOREA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 11, 2021

South Korea continues to suspend visa-free and visa-waiver programs with countries that have banned entry for South Korean citizens and travelers with short-term visas issued before April 5, 2020. South Korean residents, including long-term visa holders, can enter the country. Most foreign residents must obtain permits before departing South Korea to facilitate any planned re-entry. All permitted foreign nationals must submit a negative result from a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure. South Koreans traveling from African nations, the UK, South Africa, and Brazil must submit a negative COVID-19 test result to enter the country. Most flights from the UK remain banned through at least April 1 due to concerns over new COVID-19 variants; flights from South Korea to the UK can continue to operate, though service disruptions are occurring.

Mandatory screenings are ongoing for international arrivals at all ports of entry nationwide. Authorities in Seoul require all inbound passengers remaining in the city to undergo COVID-19 tests upon arrival. Officials will screen travelers with COVID-19 symptoms immediately and transport other passengers from Incheon International Airport (ICN) to Seoul’s designated testing facilities. All international travelers must quarantine for 14 days upon entry. South Korean nationals, long-term residents, and some relatives of these groups can self-quarantine in their residence. Other travelers must quarantine at government-designated facilities at their own expense.

Officials continue to ban cruise ships from docking at ports in the country. Busan requires vessels carrying seafarers who are nationals of or have a travel history to Bangladesh, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, and Uzbekistan Gamcheon Port to use the QR code system for contact tracing upon entry.


MDTI-WA-2021-0146
Date: 12 April 2021

CHINA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 11, 2021

China continues to ban most foreign nationals from entry. However, foreigners from most countries with valid residence permits for work, family visits, and personal matters can enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain entry permission for emergency humanitarian purposes. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters from provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Foreign nationals traveling to mainland China for work, business, or humanitarian reasons can waive the requirement for obtaining invitation letters prior to applying for new visas if they are fully inoculated with Chinese-produced COVID-19 vaccines. Most foreigners from Canada, Belgium, France, Russia, the Philippines, India, Italy, Bangladesh, the UK, Ukraine, and Ethiopia are banned, regardless of residency status, unless they have received Chinese-made COVID-19 vaccines. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders, generally flight and shipping crew members, regardless of country of origin, are exempt from entry bans. Officials have also banned flights to and from the UK until further notice.

Authorities require most inbound passengers to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure. Officials require all authorized inbound passengers from specified countries to provide evidence of both nucleic acid COVID-19 and IgM antibody tests from designated facilities in the departure country within 48 hours of boarding flights. Travelers from affected locations must also undergo additional COVID-19 tests in each country they transit. As of April 11, the measure applies to travelers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Denmark, Egypt, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, the UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Authorities will likely further expand the testing requirements to other countries in the coming days and weeks, possibly at short notice. Most travelers, regardless of nationality or residency, are barred from using land border crossings. Exceptions are in place for cargo transport, though backlogs remain possible at border checkpoints.

All authorized passengers must apply for a health certificate via the local Chinese diplomatic mission before travel. Chinese citizens must update their information through WeChat to obtain a health code before boarding flights. The government continues to conduct health screenings, including body temperature scans and nucleic acid testing, at ports of entry nationwide. International arrivals in some locations, including Beijing, Shanghai, and Qingdao, are subject to mandatory anal COVID-19 swabs. Most international travelers must quarantine for 14 days, and officials generally allow nonresident passengers to stay in government-designated hotels at their own cost. However, some governments require inbound travelers to self-quarantine and undergo medical observation for three or four weeks. All arrivals must receive a negative COVID-19 test result in quarantine before release from designated facilities.


MDTI-WA-2021-0145
Date: 12 April 2021

IRELAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 10, 2021

Authorities in Ireland plan to tighten COVID-19-related international entry restrictions for travelers from 16 additional countries effective 04:00 April 15. Travelers arriving from Armenia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bermuda, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Curacao, France, Italy, Kenya, Luxembourg Maldives, Pakistan, Turkey, Ukraine, and the US must quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated hotel. The hotel must be booked in advance of travel. The full list of countries impacted by this mandate can be found thru this link. The isolation period may be extended for up to 10 days for travelers who test positive for COVID-19 during quarantine. The same measure applies to travelers from any other country who are not in possession of a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The daily rate for the quarantine is EUR 150 (USD 178).

All incoming travelers must complete a passenger locator form prior to arrival and possess a negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within the 72 hours prior to travel. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 14 days on arrival; however, persons arriving from lower-risk (non-Category-2) countries may end their quarantine periods early by taking a COVID-19 test confirming a negative result no less than five days after arrival. Essential transport workers, individuals in transit, and travelers whose journeys originate in Northern Ireland, UK, are exempt from these requirements.


MDTI-WA-2021-0144
Date: 07 April 2021

BELIZE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 7, 2021

Air travel is continuing, and the maritime borders have reopened at the ports San Pedro, Belize City, Placencia, and Punta Gorda. However, the country’s land ports of entry remain closed to most nonresident foreign nationals, and officials in Mexico have closed that country’s borders with Belize to all nonessential travel. All arriving residents and nonresidents must download the Belize Health mobile application and fill in their details before travel. As of April 6, the following additional requirements remain in effect:
– Upon entry, travelers must present a negative result from a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test taken within 96 hours before travel to Belize, or from any other approved test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival. Travelers unable to produce such documentation will be denied entry. Travelers who provide proof of having received two full doses of a COVID-19 vaccine do not have to provide the negative COVID-19 test result.
– All travelers are required to download the Belize Health mobile application no more than 72 hours prior to arrival.
– Travelers may be randomly selected for a second test upon arrival at the airport. Any traveler testing positive for COVID-19 must complete a 14-day quarantine at a government-approved quarantine hotel at the traveler’s expense.
– Visitors are required to stay at Gold Standard hotels but may use any means of transport to move around, including car rentals.
– Visitors can move about freely; however, it is recommended they remain within the Tourism Safe Corridor comprising Gold Standard certified restaurants, tour operators, tourism sites and attractions, and gift shops.

Belize nationals and residents, as well as foreign diplomats accredited in Belize, work permit holders, and persons traveling on business, may enter through the land borders. However, travelers may only do so if they have received authorization in advance from the national government; moreover, they must enter quarantine upon arrival.


MDTI-WA-2021-0143
Date: 07 April 2021

CAMBODIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 7, 2021

Authorities allow online applications for short-term travel visas; however, issuance is restricted to persons traveling for essential reasons. The short-term visas are valid for three months and allow the holder to stay in country for up to 30 days. Applicants for short-term travel visas must provide proof of medical insurance coverage in the amount of at least USD 50,000, a medical certificate from local health authorities issued within 72 hours before travel stating the individual is free from COVID-19; the traveler must also produce documentation demonstrating that the travel is for essential reasons. Travelers must take COVID-19 tests upon arrival and quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated facility. With limited exceptions, inbound foreign nationals must pay a USD-2,000 deposit to cover costs, including USD 100 for COVID-19 testing and USD 30 for a certificate stating they are free from the virus.

The issuance of tourist visas, visa-on-arrival services, and visa-free travel remain suspended. Flights from Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines remain banned.


MDTI-WA-2021-0142
Date: 07 April 2021

ITALY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 7, 2021

Starting April 7, travelers entering Italy from Austria, Israel, and the UK must self-isolate for five days upon arrival, before submitting to a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. These countries have been added to a list of around 30 countries from which the mandatory quarantine period for travelers has been reduced to five days from 14. Such arrivals must still present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within the 48 hours prior to travel. A 14-day quarantine is still in effect for travelers from the state of Tyrol in Austria.

Numerous international entry restrictions remain in place. All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must currently fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.

In addition, travel from outside the EEA and Schengen-associated states – with the exception of that from Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand – is currently prohibited unless conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons; all permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0141
Date: 06 April 2021

OMAN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 6, 2021

Authorities in Oman will prohibit foreigners from entering the country beginning 12:00 April 8 until further notice in an effort to combat a surge in COVID-19 cases. Only citizens and residents will be permitted to enter. Furthermore, a 21:00-04:00 nightly curfew will be in force during the month of Ramadan, which is slated to begin April 12. The existing 20:00-05:00 nightly curfew will be lifted on April 8 as scheduled, however. All nonessential travel is prohibited during curfew hours. Moreover, an existing nationwide directive requiring commercial premises to remain closed during curfew hours has been extended from April 8 until the end of Ramadan. The measure does not apply to pharmacies, health facilities, or other services deemed essential. All public gatherings, including congregational prayers, are prohibited during Ramadan.

All travelers to Oman are required to undergo a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test within 72 hours before their arrival. Moreover, all incoming travelers must download the “Tarassud+” mobile application before entering the country. An additional PCR test will be conducted upon arrival with those remaining in Oman taking another such test on the eighth day of their stay. All incoming travelers are also required to quarantine for a minimum of seven days at a government-approved hotel or isolation center. Until further notice, the option to isolate at a private residence has been suspended. Travelers must book their quarantine accommodations via the Sahala platform. Release from quarantine is contingent upon a negative COVID-19 test result. All foreigners, except Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) nationals, must have international health insurance covering COVID-19 expenses for the duration of their stay.


MDTI-WA-2021-0140
Date: 06 April 2021

LUXEMBOURG – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 6, 2021

Travelers from countries within the European Union or Schengen Area, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and Vatican City, as well as residents of Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, are permitted to enter Luxembourg. Most travelers from other countries, including the UK, remain prohibited, though exceptions are in place for essential work, study, and family reasons.

Luxembourg requires all incoming international air travelers to present documentation proving that they have tested negative for COVID-19. The negative result must be from a nucleic acid or rapid antigen test taken no more than 72 hours prior to the flight’s departure and be presented at boarding. Transporters and aircraft crew members are exempt.


MDTI-WA-2021-0139
Date: 06 April 2021

MALDIVES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 6, 2021

International arrivals must submit an online health declaration via the “Imuga” portal within 24 hours before travel and produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using an RT-PCR test taken within 96 hours before departure. Inbound foreign travelers must reserve accommodations at approved lodging establishments; split stays between facilities must be approved by the Ministry of Tourism at least two days before departure.

Maldivian nationals and permanent residents must undergo a 10-day home quarantine. Passengers who have spent at least 12 hours in the UK in the past 14 days must also undergo quarantine. Quarantined individuals typically undergo COVID-19 tests on the fifth and tenth day. Some testing and quarantine exemptions apply for arriving international travelers whose medical histories show they have recovered from COVID-19. Any person staying for over 48 hours in the Greater Male region must take a pre-departure COVID-19 test within 72 hours before leaving the Maldives. Authorities have advised Maldivian citizens to refrain from all nonessential international travel.


MDTI-WA-2021-0138
Date: 06 April 2021

GERMANY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 6, 2021

Germany will introduce tighter entry restrictions for travelers from the Netherlands starting April 6 due to concerns over the COVID-19 incidence rate in that country. Authorities have classified the Netherlands as a high incidence area. All travelers who have spent any time in a high incidence area in the last 10 days must self-isolate for at least 10 days in addition to presenting a negative COVID-19 test result before departure for Germany.

Authorities have designated various countries and regions as “high incidence,” “risk,” or “virus variant” depending on local disease activity. For a full English-language list of locations designated by the German government as virus variant, risk, and high incidence areas, click link.

Most travel from outside the EEA, with the exception of that from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, is prohibited. Exemptions are in place for EU nationals or residents and their family members, individuals carrying out essential work, or individuals traveling for urgent reasons. Since March 28, all travelers arriving in Germany by air must present a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within the previous 48 hours; originally, only travelers arriving from designated risk areas were required to provide such a test.

Authorities have extended an existing ban on direct passenger transport with “virus variant” areas, locations deemed to carry an increased risk of infection from a variant strain of COVID-19, until at least April 14. As of April 5, Brazil, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries, including South Africa, remain designated virus-variant areas. Entry from these areas is limited to German nationals and residents, as well as certain essential workers. Individuals not traveling for essential work are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Border officials are conducting random checks on private vehicles entering the country from virus-variant areas that share a border with Germany.


MDTI-WA-2021-0137
Date: 05 April 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 APRIL 2021

United Kingdom: Authorities plan to tighten international entry restrictions for certain travelers from 04:00 April 9. Travelers from the Philippines, Pakistan, Kenya, and Bangladesh will be added to the country’s red list. All travelers who have visited countries on the UK’s “red list” within the 10 days prior to arrival are barred from entry; British and Irish nationals, visa holders, and permanent residents are exempt from the entry ban. All permitted travelers arriving from these countries will be required to self-isolate in a government-approved hotel quarantine facility for 10 days at their own expense. The specific countries in addition to the aforementioned are Angola, Argentina, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ecuador, Ethiopia, eSwatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Suriname, Tanzania, UAE, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Flights with South Africa remain suspended.

As of April 2, all international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside the British Isles and Ireland must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crews, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria, as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt.

All international arrivals from outside the British Isles and Ireland must undergo a 10-day quarantine during which they must take two additional COVID-19 tests. Arrivals must take the tests on the second and eighth days of their quarantine period. Health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodation must stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. All arrivals must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days.

Authorities require all outbound international travelers leaving the UK from England to complete a travel declaration attesting that the trip falls under the categories of travel that are permitted in accordance with current COVID-19 restrictions. Travelers who do not possess such a document may be denied access to their flight and could be fined. Persons traveling to Ireland are exempt from the requirement. Travel declarations are not required for international travel originating in Northern Ireland, Scotland, or Wales.

Authorities in the UK plan to begin using a new procedure for testing international arrivals effective April 6 as part of measures to combat the spread of COVID-19. The system will use lateral flow tests to identify cases among certain traveler categories entering the UK, enabling them to avoid quarantine. The categories include hauliers, transport crew, seafarers, seasonal agricultural workers, and certain travelers engaged in essential activity in support of the national interest. Such arrivals will be required to take a test before the end of their second day in the UK; those staying in the UK for longer periods will be required to take two further tests every three days. Arrivals staying in the UK for fewer than two days will not require a test. Tests will be obtained through a variety of means, including workplace and community testing programs, home-testing kits, and – for hauliers – at testing sites situated along major routes. Individuals receiving a positive test must take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and self-isolate for 10 days. Arrivals from elsewhere in the British Isles and Ireland will not be subject to the requirements.

Ireland: Authorities plan to tighten COVID-19 related international entry restrictions for travelers from certain countries from 04:00 April 6. Travelers arriving from Albania, Andorra, Aruba, Bahrain, Bonaire, Ethiopia, Israel, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lebanon, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Nigeria, North Macedonia, Oman, Palestine, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Sint Eustatius, Saba, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Serbia, Somalia, and Wallis and Futuna Islands must quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated hotel. The isolation period may be extended for up to 10 days for travelers who test positive for COVID-19 during quarantine. Previously authorities imposed the same restrictions for travelers from Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Suriname, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The same measure applies for travelers from any other country who are not in possession of a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The daily rate for the quarantine is EUR 150 (USD 178).

All incoming travelers must complete a passenger locator form prior to arrival and possess a negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within the 72 hours prior to travel. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 14 days on arrival; however, persons arriving from lower-risk (non-Category-2) countries may end their quarantine periods early by taking a COVID-19 test confirming a negative result no less than five days after arrival. Essential transport workers, individuals in transit, and travelers whose journeys originate in Northern Ireland, UK, are exempt from these requirements.

Austria: Authorities in certain areas in Austria plan to extend the localized COVID-19 lockdowns over the Easter period in an effort to prevent a spike in the spread of the UK variant of the virus. The lockdown will be extended until April 11 in Lower Austria and Burgenland. During these periods, nonessential businesses will be closed in the respective areas. In addition, the nightly curfew will be replaced with all-day restrictions on movement; residents may leave their homes only to purchase essential goods and get physical exercise. Local authorities previously extended the lockdown in Vienna until April 11.

Travelers arriving in Austria from designated risk areas must produce a negative result from a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test taken within the prior 72 hours prior to arrival, or an antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival. Such travelers must also self-isolate for 10 days on arrival, though they can end self-isolation early by taking an additional COVID-19 test after five days. Cross-border commuters and those in transit are exempt from this requirement; business travelers are also exempt from the quarantine requirement if they can provide proof of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. As of April 1, all countries are considered risk areas with the exception of Australia, Iceland, New Zealand, Norway, Singapore, South Korea, and the Vatican City. All travelers, regardless of point of origin, must register with authorities prior to arrival; the required Pre-Travel Clearance form is available online.

Travel is only permitted from EEA countries or Andorra, Australia, Monaco, New Zealand, Norway, San Marino, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and the Vatican City. Limited exceptions are in place for nationals and residents of the permitted countries, health workers, freight workers, diplomats, individuals in transit, and urgent or essential reasons decided on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities have extended a ban on flights connecting with Brazil and South Africa until at least April 4 due to variants of COVID-19 active in those countries. Flights with the UK are permitted to resume.

Finland: Authorities in Finland have extended the nation’s COVID-19-related international entry restrictions until at least April 30; the measures had initially been slated to expire April 17. Nationals and residents of Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Vatican, Rwanda, and Thailand arriving directly from those countries may enter Finland without restrictions. Travel from all other locations is only permitted for limited essential reasons, such as Finnish nationals and residents and their families returning home, critical work or study, individuals in transit, and other urgent reasons to be decided on a case-by-case basis.

All individuals arriving from countries with which travel is restricted will be required to take a COVID-19 test upon entry unless they produce a negative result from a test taken within the previous 72 hours or evidence that they have been infected with COVID-19 in the previous six months. Arrivals are then asked to self-isolate for 14 days or until a negative test is confirmed from a second test taken no less than 72 hours after their arrival. Individuals not complying with these measures may be placed into a state quarantine facility for up to 14 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0136
Date: 05 April 2021

CHILE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 2, 2021

Authorities have announced new COVID-19 regulations, effective April 5, that will significantly restrict travel to and movement in the country. Under the new measures, nonresident foreigners will be prohibited from entry to Chile unless they have been specially authorized to enter by the Chilean diplomatic mission in their country. Under this regulation, the drivers of cargo trucks may continue to enter Chile, but only if they present negative results of a PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. Such drivers will also undergo an antigen test upon entry and will be required to enter quarantine if they test positive. These restrictions will be in place until at least May 5.

Both Chileans and resident foreigners will likewise be prohibited from leaving Chile April 5-May 5 except if authorized to do so for emergency purposes, such as seeking treatment for an urgent medical issue or carrying out work that the government considers to be essential to Chilean national interests.

The modified restrictions also broaden the nationwide curfew, which will change from 22:00-05:00 to 21:00-05:00 April 5. During curfew hours, all persons must remain in their homes. Persons over the age of 75 must stay in their homes at all times; exceptions are in place for limited outings and depending on COVID-19 activity levels in the area.

In an effort to reduce gatherings of people shopping, the new restrictions also temporarily ban the retail sale of some items, such as clothing and cosmetics, April 5-20. The regulations also modify the legal definitions of essential workers and essential domestic goods and services to be more restrictive, reduce the ability of multiple people per household to conduct essential shopping on weekends, and further limit the number of people who may attend religious services.


MDTI-WA-2021-0135
Date: 05 April 2021

AUSTRALIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 03 APRIL 2021

South Australia: It has lifted an entry ban for nonresidents from Greater Brisbane, Queensland, April 3. All arrivals from Greater Brisbane will no longer need to self-quarantine, though they must still undergo COVID-19 testing on days one, five, and 13, and self-isolate if they display symptoms. Authorities also plan to allow most individuals who are currently in quarantine, having traveled to Greater Brisbane since March 20, to leave isolation; a small group of travelers who have been at the COVID-19 exposure sites in Greater Brisbane will still have to complete their full 14-day quarantine.

Officials are maintaining other restrictions. South Australia allows most domestic travelers to enter without quarantine. Everyone entering South Australia must complete the Cross Border Travel Registration before arrival. Individuals with recent exposure to any venues with known COVID-19 activity will be subject to 14-day quarantines.

Authorities require all international arrivals to undergo a 14-day quarantine and receive COVID-19 tests within 24 hours of arrival and on the twelfth day of quarantine. Travelers who have been in New Zealand for two weeks are exempt from quarantine and testing requirements. South Australia charges all required travelers, including Australian citizens and permanent residents, for quarantine, payable after completion. Quarantine fees are AUD 3,000 (USD 2,289) for the first adult and AUD 1,000 (USD 773) for each additional adult or AUD 500 (USD 382) for children over three years old. Any international arrivals who purchased tickets before 1200 ACST July 13, 2020, are exempt from payment.

Victoria: Authorities have eased entry restrictions for nonresident travelers from Greater Brisbane, including Ipswich, Moreton Bay, Logan, and Redlands, as of April 2 amid ongoing COVID-19 concerns. Officials continue to classify Greater Brisbane and Gladstone Regional Council in Queensland and Byron Shire in New South Wales as orange zones. Travelers from these locations can enter the state but must get a COVID-19 test within 72 hours of arrival and self-quarantine from entry until receiving a negative test result. Individuals that visited designated exposure sites in Queensland or New South Wales must contact health authorities and continue to self-isolate for 14 days.

Victoria allows travel from most Australian locations. Officials require all travelers to apply for a permit to enter the state.

The government continues to suspend most inbound international commercial passenger flights until April 8. Authorities will allow up to 800 passengers the first week, possibly increasing to 1,120 passengers weekly from April 15. Flights with New Zealand are operational; travelers from New Zealand do not have to quarantine, though they must apply for a permit before entry. Most international travelers entering Australia must quarantine at government-designated facilities for 14 days in the city of arrival. Victoria requires inbound travelers to complete a Victorian Quarantine Arrival From before departure. The state charges travelers for quarantine, payable after the quarantine period. Quarantine fees are AUD 3,000 (USD 2,288) for the first adult and AUD 1,000 (USD 762) for each additional adult or AUD 500 (USD 381) for children above three years old.


MDTI-WA-2021-0134
Date: 05 April 2021

BRAZIL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF APRIL 3, 2021

Certain significant restrictions – including nightly curfews and nonessential business closures – have been extended in several of Brazil’s states as of April 3 due to high levels of COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations. Officials in the state of Rio de Janeiro maintain a nightly 23:00-05:00 curfew until at least April 6. Most businesses can operate at 50 percent capacity outside of the curfew hours. Similar restrictions are likely to be extended through mid-April. In the state of Sao Paulo, a nightly 20:00-05:00 curfew remains in force until at least April 11. Additionally, most nonessential businesses, including restaurants, are closed for on-premises services. Beaches and parks also remain closed.

Restrictions for travelers entering Brazil remain largely unchanged as compared with those in force in late February. A ban on entry for nonresident travelers who have been in South Africa or the UK within14 days prior to arrival remains in effect. Citizens and legal residents of Brazil who have traveled through those two countries within the past 14 days will be permitted to repatriate; however, they must complete a two-week quarantine upon arrival. Travelers entering Brazil by air from other destinations must present a negative result from a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction test (RT-PCR) taken no more than 72 hours before travel and must complete a pre-arrival health form. Foreign citizens are allowed to enter Brazil by air for visits of no longer than 90 days.

Nonresident foreign nationals remain prohibited from entering the country by land and water. Brazilian citizens, permanent residents, and their immediate family members, as well as foreign residents working for international organizations or traveling for trade or humanitarian purposes, are exempt from the ban. Apart from the overarching land border closures and as part of a joint agreement, the land border crossings with Paraguay – specifically those at Foz do Iguacu, Ponta Pora, and Mundo Novo – are open.


MDTI-WA-2021-0133
Date: 05 April 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 APRIL 2021

Bangladesh: Officials in Bangladesh plan to impose a seven-day nationwide lockdown beginning April 5 due to increased COVID-19 activity. Essential personnel and services are exempt from the measure. Authorities stated they will suspend passenger train services and domestic flight services nationwide during the lockdown; cargo trains and international flights will remain operational.

International commercial flights are operating. However, limited flights to and from India are operational under a bilateral “air bubble” arrangement, mainly serving authorized visa holders, repatriates, officials, and diplomats. Additionally, officials have banned travelers from European nations, except the UK, Argentina, Bahrain, Brazil, Chile, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Peru, Qatar, South Africa, Turkey, and Uruguay, due to concerns over new variants of COVID-19. Transit passengers from the aforementioned countries who do not exit the airport may enter. The rules are applicable through at least April 18.

Authorities require inbound passengers above 10 years old to obtain PCR test results within 72 hours of departure, confirming that they do not have COVID-19. Arrivals must quarantine for 14 days either at home or a designated facility, based on their country of origin and medical assessment. Transit passengers who exit airports en route must take a repeat test within 72 hours before leaving for Bangladesh; such arrivals must undergo self-paid institutional quarantine for four days, followed by additional COVID-19 testing. Those who test negative will serve the remainder of their 14-day quarantine at home. Overseas Bangladeshi workers in nations without PCR testing facilities may seek prior approval to produce alternative health certification, such as antigen test results. Passengers without approved certification may no longer board Bangladesh-bound flights.

Bangladesh has suspended visa-on-arrival services until further notice; travelers must obtain a visa from their local Bangladeshi diplomatic mission. Outbound air passengers above 10 years old must undergo COVID-19 testing at a government-approved facility within 72 hours before departure; exempted travelers include pre-approved foreigners departing within 14 days of arrival in Bangladesh, as well as holders of diplomatic and official passports and their family members. Land border crossings and ports are open for cargo shipments.

Philippines: Officials have extended the enhanced community quarantine (ECQ) in Metro Manila and the surrounding provinces of Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, and Rizal, through April 11. Under ECQ, residents must stay at home, except to work in essential industries, obtain essential supplies, and for emergencies, among others. On-site work is suspended, except for essential services. Nonessential mass gatherings are banned. Public transport vehicles can operate to service commuters allowed to leave homes. Authorities are enforcing an 18:00-05:00 nightly curfew, with exceptions for essential workers, among others. Some Metro Manila cities, including Manila and San Juan, have reissued or will reissue quarantine passes for residents to present to officials when in public. Nonessential travel to and from the region remains suspended.

Increased security measures remain in place across Metro Manila and the surrounding provinces to impose the curbs. Officials have set up more than 1,100 checkpoints in and around Metro Manila to enforce the protocols. Significant business and transport disruptions will likely continue.

Japan: Authorities plan to impose increased business and gathering controls in Osaka, Hyogo, and Miyagi prefectures April 5 to May 5 amid elevated COVID-19 activity in the areas. Under the new restrictions, officials require restaurants and drinking establishments to stop serving alcohol from 19:00 and to close by 20:00 daily. Authorities also ask residents to remain at home after 20:00, encourage businesses to allow telecommuting, and reduce capacity at sporting and entertainment venues to 50 percent, with a cap of 5,000 people.

The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; however, officials permit foreigners to enter under special circumstances. Authorities may continue to prohibit business travel from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea beyond the state of emergency period.

Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure for Japan. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days. The government does not permit people who cannot undergo testing to board flights or enter Japan. Exceptions may be possible in some circumstances, but affected passengers must contact their local Japanese diplomatic mission before departure. As of April 3, individuals arriving from the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Pakistan, Poland, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the UAE must quarantine at a government-designated facility for three days and undergo COVID-19 testing before completing the remainder of the 14-day self-quarantine period.

Returning residents must complete a pledge to abide by quarantine orders, maintain location data on their mobile phones, and refrain from using public transport during the first 14 days in the country. Entrants must also download the OSSMA, Skype, and COVID-19 Contact Confirming Application (COCOA) mobile applications. People that refuse may have to quarantine at designated facilities. Officials could publicly name citizens and foreign residents who violate quarantine orders; foreign nationals could also lose their residence status.

Flights from South Korea and China are only authorized to land at Narita International Airport (NRT) and Kansai International Airport (KIX). Transit flights for foreign nationals are only allowed through NRT. International passenger ferry services remain suspended.

Myanmar: Authorities continue to enforce restrictions in Rakhine State as of April 1 to stem the spread of COVID-19. The government continues to ban locals from traveling outside their towns; exemptions are possible with approval from ward and village officials. Schools remain shut until further notice. Wearing facemasks when in public is still compulsory. Officials are also likely enforcing restrictions in internally displaced people (IDP) camps; rules may include banning nongovernmental organization (NGO) members from meeting IDPs. The government’s level of enforcement of the rules is unclear. Local governments in parts of the state, especially those where known COVID-19 cases reside, may implement stricter curbs on top of the statewide controls.


MDTI-WA-2021-0132
Date: 31 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 31 MARCH 2021

United Kingdom: Authorities in the UK plan to begin using a new procedure for testing international arrivals effective April 6. The system will use lateral flow tests to identify cases among certain traveler categories entering the UK, enabling them to avoid quarantine. The categories include hauliers, transport crew, seafarers, seasonal agricultural workers, and certain travelers engaged in essential activity in support of the national interest. Such arrivals will be required to take a test before the end of their second day in the UK; those staying in the UK for longer periods will be required to take two further tests every three days. Arrivals staying in the UK for fewer than two days will not require a test. Tests will be obtained through a variety of means, including workplace and community testing programs, home-testing kits, and – for hauliers – at testing sites situated along major routes. Individuals receiving a positive test must take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and self-isolate for 10 days. Arrivals from elsewhere in the British Isles and Ireland will not be subject to the requirements.

As of March 29, all international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside the British Isles and Ireland must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crews, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria, as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt.

All international arrivals from outside the British Isles and Ireland must undergo a 10-day quarantine during which they must take two additional COVID-19 tests. Arrivals must take the tests on the second and eighth days of their quarantine period. Health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodation must stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. All arrivals must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days.

Travelers who have visited countries on the UK’s “red list” within the 10 days prior to arrival will be barred from entry. The specific countries are Angola, Argentina, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ecuador, Ethiopia, eSwatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Suriname, Tanzania, UAE, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Flights with South Africa remain suspended. British and Irish nationals, visa holders, and permanent residents are exempt from the entry bans, though any permitted arrivals from the above locations must quarantine for 10 days in a government-designated hotel at their own expense.

Authorities require all outbound international travelers leaving the UK from England to complete a travel declaration attesting that the trip falls under the categories of travel that are permitted in accordance with current COVID-19 restrictions. Travelers who do not possess such a document may be denied access to their flight and could be fined. Persons traveling to Ireland are exempt from the requirement. Travel declarations are not required for international travel originating in Northern Ireland, Scotland, or Wales.

Ireland: Authorities plan to ease certain COVID-19-related domestic restrictions from April 12. Under the new measures, the current directive restricting travel by residents to within 5 km (3 miles) of their homes will expanded to allow county-wide travel; travel across county lines will also be permitted up to 20 km (12 miles) from the individual’s home. In addition, outdoor social gatherings will be allowed for up to two households.

All incoming travelers must complete a passenger locator form prior to arrival and possess a negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within the 72 hours prior to travel. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 14 days on arrival; however, persons arriving from lower-risk (non-Category-2) countries may end their quarantine periods early by taking a COVID-19 test confirming a negative result no less than five days after arrival. Essential transport workers, individuals in transit, and travelers whose journeys originate in Northern Ireland, UK, are exempt from these requirements.

Travelers arriving from high-risk (“Category 2”) countries or who are not in possession of a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test must quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated hotel. The isolation period may be extended for up to 10 days for travelers who test positive for COVID-19 during quarantine. The daily rate for the quarantine will be EUR 150 (USD 178).

As of March 30, high-risk/Category-2 countries include Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Suriname, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Poland: Authorities have tightened the nation’s COVID-19-related international entry restrictions effective March 30. Under the new directive, all travelers arriving from the Schengen area must present a negative COVID-19 test result dated no more than 48 hours prior to arrival; results from either a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or an antigen test are acceptable. Those who do not possess a negative test will be required to self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. All travelers arriving from outside of the Schengen area must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival; travelers may end their quarantine by providing a negative COVID-19 test taken within 48 hours after arrival. Travelers who have been issued a certificate of vaccination with a vaccine that has been authorized in the European Union are exempt from quarantine.

Incoming travel is permitted from EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as from Australia, Belarus, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, and the UK. Most travel from other countries is prohibited with certain exceptions in place for students and essential workers, among other groups.

Entry checks remain in place on land borders with Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. The border with Russia can be crossed only at the Bezledy and Grzechotki border crossings. The border with Belarus may be crossed at the Kuznica, Bobrowniki, and Terespol crossings, while the border with Ukraine may be crossed at the Dorohusk, Korczowa, Hrebenne, Medyka, and Budomierz crossings.

For domestic restrictions, authorities have imposed temporary restrictions over the upcoming Easter holiday period in order to reduce the potential for increased COVID-19 activity.

Portugal: Authorities has extended international entry restrictions through April 15. Authorities have also tightened the restrictions. Travelers from EU/EEA countries with an incidence rate of more than 500 cases per 100,000 people may only enter the country for essential purposes and must self-isolate for 14 days. This currently includes 11 EU/EEA countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Hungary, Italy, Malta, Poland, Slovenia, and Sweden. Travelers from EU/EEA countries with an incidence rate of over 150 cases per 100,000 people may only make essential trips to Portugal. This currently applies to 15 EU/EEA countries: Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovakia, and Switzerland.

A number of other international entry restrictions continue to apply. Entry is only permitted for travelers from EU-associated states, as well as Australia, China, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, and Thailand. Travel from other countries remains prohibited except in limited essential cases, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting for essential work or study. All permitted arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours before boarding. Travelers arriving from countries with COVID-19 incidence rates of over 500 per 100,000 inhabitants must also self-isolate for 14 days on arrival.

Additionally, all flights to and from the UK and Brazil remain suspended through April 15. Only humanitarian and repatriation flights from these countries will be permitted. All permitted travelers from these locations, as well as from South Africa, must be in possession of a negative result from a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure and must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. Moreover, the border with Spain remains closed for nonessential crossings until at least April 15.

Italy: Authorities announced March 30 that travelers entering from EEA and Schengen-associated states will be required to self-isolate for five days on arrival, before submitting to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test. It is unclear when the requirement will come into force, though such arrivals will continue to require proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within the 48 hours prior to travel.

All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must currently fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Specific measures are in place for travelers who have stayed in Austria for more than 12 hours in the previous 14 days; these travelers must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test before boarding any passenger transport entering Italy, submit to a COVID-19 test within 48 hours of arrival, self-isolate for 14 days, and take a final COVID-19 test at the end of the self-isolation period. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.

In addition, travel from outside the EEA and Schengen-associated states – with the exception of that from Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand – is currently prohibited unless conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons; all permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days.

An international entry ban remains in force until April 6 for persons who have visited or transited the UK within the previous 14 days. The measure does not apply to those who have been legal residents of Italy since before Dec. 23, 2020, or those traveling for an essential reason; such essential reasons must be declared in writing. Exempt travelers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19; the test must have been taken no more than 72 hours before departing for Italy. They must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival. Regardless of the test results, arrivals from the UK must report to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days. Nonresidents who have visited or transited Brazil within 14 days prior to arriving in Italy will be prohibited from entering or transiting the country.


MDTI-WA-2021-0131
Date: 31 March 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 31 MARCH 2021

Thailand: Thailand continues to enforce restrictions as its nationwide state of emergency remains in effect through May 31 to facilitate the implementation of protocols.

Officials will reduce the quarantine requirements for all arrivals to 10 days from April 1. Authorities will still require passengers coming from Botswana, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe to undergo 14 days of on-arrival quarantine. Arrivals from all countries must obtain a Certificate of Entry from a Thai embassy if they are foreigners, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip, and provide evidence of a quarantine facility booking.

Limited inbound tourist flights are operating. Cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft remain operational. Authorities are allowing travelers from 56 locations to enter Thailand without visas. The 56 locations are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Foreigners can transit at local airports with protocols in place.

Authorities intend to allow vaccinated tourists to enter Phuket without on-arrival quarantine requirements from July 1 as part of its further reopening plan. Officials may adjust or delay the rules at short notice due to changes in local or international COVID-1 activity.

Philippines: Officials have extended community quarantine protocols of varying levels in most parts of the country through April 30, with stricter controls in some localities with varying time frames. The country remains under Code Red Sublevel 2 on its code alert system, indicating ongoing local virus transmission with greater numbers of cases than the government can address.

The central government has ordered Metro Manila and the surrounding provinces of Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, and Rizal to enforce the enhanced community quarantine (ECQ) through April 4. Additionally, local officials in Tuguegarao City are enacting ECQ through April 8. Quirino Province and Santiago City will implement modified enhanced community quarantine (MECQ) rules April 1-15 and April 1-30 respectively.

Authorities continue to ban entry for most foreigners through 23:59 April 21. Exemptions are in place for diplomats and members of international organizations and their dependents who hold relevant visas, maritime workers with official permits for crew change, foreign spouses and children of Filipino citizens who are traveling with the Filipino nationals, and emergency or humanitarian situations, among others.

People who are still allowed to enter the Philippines must have valid visas, quarantine at designated facilities for at least a week, and undergo a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test on the sixth day upon arrival. Inbound foreign nationals must also pre-book a quarantine facility for at least seven nights. The entry of foreign nationals is subject to the maximum capacity of inbound passengers at the ports of entry; Metro Manila’s Ninoy Aquino International Airport (MNL) will cap international arrivals at 1,500 people daily through April 19.

Malaysia: Authorities have extended the nation’s existing domestic COVID-19 restrictions through at least April 14. Nonessential interstate travel remains suspended nationwide. Strict protocols known as “conditional movement control orders” (CMCO) will remain in effect in Kuala Lumpur and the states of Johor, Kelantan, Penang, and Selangor through April 14. CMCOs will alco stay in force in Sarawak through at least April 12. Most locations in Malaysia are set to continue the less strict “recovery movement control orders” (RMCO) through April 14

State governments may impose additional restrictions on top of those mandated by the central authorities. Sarawak requires all persons arriving in the state, including those from other parts of Malaysia, to present a negative result from a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test taken within 72 hours before entry. Central or state authorities may enact or reintroduce restrictions if COVID-19 cases increase.

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and maritime vessel crew members. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.

Malaysia allows limited cross-border travel with Singapore for business and official purposes. Under the Reciprocal Green Lane (RGL) scheme, people can travel short-term from Singapore with an exemption from standard quarantine requirements for arrivals. The travelers must present approval letters from immigration authorities and a company or government agency in Malaysia, obtain visas if required, and test for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and upon arrival. Such travelers must comply with a controlled itinerary for the first 14 days and adhere to contact tracing measures. Additionally, under the Periodic Commuting Arrangement (PCA) scheme, which allows travelers to undertake multiple-entry visits through land border crossings at Woodlands or Tuas for 90-day stays, people must isolate at government-designated facilities for at least a week. Travelers can leave the quarantine sites upon testing negative for COVID-19.

Hong Kong: Authorities have extended restrictions in Hong Kong through at least April 14. Authorities continue to conduct mandatory testing for high-risk groups, including people who work or live at locations with reported outbreaks or employees in specific occupations. Officials also require residents that may have been exposed to COVID-19 to get tested.

Hong Kong has restricted land border crossings with mainland China indefinitely, though officials are planning to resume air travel with mainland China in the coming weeks. Authorized travelers are only permitted entry at the Shenzhen Bay checkpoint and the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge. Immigration processing centers at Ocean Terminal and Kai Tak Cruise Terminal remain closed.

Officials are allowing some transit flights at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) if grouped in a single booking and the connection time is shorter than 24 hours. Airport Authority Hong Kong is permitting transit flights originating from mainland China until further notice under the same rules; transit flights to mainland China remain banned. Airlines have significantly reduced flights due to decreased demand; additional cancellations are likely.

The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have not visited elsewhere for 21 days. Individuals arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints. Officials have barred entry for people who have stayed in designated extremely high-risk countries Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours within 21 days of departure. However, officials intend to start permitting residents to return from the UK on select flights by the end of April. As of March 30, Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, the UAE, and the US as very high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from these locations and permitted travelers from extremely high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure.

Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to quarantine at a hotel for 21 days. Officials plan to ease quarantine requirements to 14 days for travelers from Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore, though specifics remain unclear. All passengers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All entrants must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine, provided they test negative for COVID-19.

Hong Kong is maintaining quarantine measures for crews of aircraft and maritime vessels indefinitely. Under these requirements, ships without cargo cannot exchange crews. On other ships, workers are no longer allowed to enter the territory and must travel directly to the airport after disembarking. Inbound ship crews and flight crew members must obtain a negative COVID-19 test result within 48 hours of departure for Hong Kong. Both airlines and shipping companies must arrange point-to-point transport for employees to limit interaction with the public.


MDTI-WA-2021-0130
Date: 19 March 2021

AUSTRALIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF MARCH 19, 2021

An entry ban remains in effect for most foreign nationals. However, permanent residents, long-term pass holders, and their immediate relatives can enter Australia. All inbound international passengers must undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine at designated facilities at the port of entry. New Zealand residents can enter Australia through specific ports of entry without quarantine. However, state governments are implementing their own quarantine requirements for New Zealand travelers.

Inbound travelers must obtain a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result within 72 hours before departing for Australia. People who test positive for COVID-19 and their close contacts or travel companions are not allowed to travel to the country. Exceptions to the requirement are in place for seasonal workers from locations where testing is not widely available. Officials also require passengers aged 12 and older, as well as crew members, to wear facemasks on all international and domestic flights until further notice, with limited exceptions.


MDTI-WA-2021-0129
Date: 19 March 2021

JAPAN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF MARCH 19, 2021

The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; however, officials permit foreigners to enter under special circumstances. Authorities may continue to prohibit business travel from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea beyond the state of emergency period.

Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days. The government will not permit people who cannot undergo testing to board flights or enter Japan from March 19. Exceptions may be possible in some circumstances, but affected passengers must contact their local Japanese diplomatic mission before departure. As of March 18, individuals arriving from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the United Arab Emirates must quarantine at a government-designated facility for three days and undergo COVID-19 testing before completing the remainder of the 14-day self-quarantine period. The requirement will become effective for travelers from the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Pakistan, and Poland from March 20.


MDTI-WA-2021-0128
Date: 19 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 MARCH 2021

Poland: Incoming travel is permitted from EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as from Australia, Belarus, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, and the UK. Most travel from other countries is prohibited with certain exceptions in place for students and essential workers, among other classes of persons. All permitted travelers arriving via public transport must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival; travelers arriving from the Czech Republic and Slovakia via private transport must also self-isolate for 10 days. Individuals possessing a negative result from a COVID-19 test no taken no more than 48 hours prior to arrival, as well travelers who have been vaccinated against COVID-19, are exempt from the self-isolation requirement.

Germany: Authorities in Germany have extended an existing ban on direct passenger transport with so-called “virus variant areas,” i.e., locations deemed to be at increased risk of infection from a novel variant of COVID-19. The directive will remain in effect until at least March 31. As of March 17, Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Tyrol in Austria, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries are designated virus-variant areas. Entry from these areas is limited to German nationals and residents, as well as certain essential workers; all permitted arrivals must provide a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within the previous 48 hours if requested by authorities. Individuals not traveling for essential work are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Border officials are conducting random checks on private vehicles entering the country from virus-variant areas that share a border with Germany.

France: Authorities have relaxed certain international entry restrictions. Nonessential travel from Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and the UK has been allowed to resume. Arrivals from these locations are still required to provide a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure. Additionally, the Council of State (Conseil d’etat) issued a ruling on March 12 suspending the requirement that French nationals provide a compelling reason in order to return to Metropolitan France from countries other than those in the European Area (i.e. EU member states, Andorra, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland, and the Vatican) or those approved for nonessential travel (Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and the UK). The ruling does not, however, appear to have been officially implemented as of March 18, and it remains unclear when it may fully go into effect. Regardless, the compelling reason rule will continue to apply for French nationals arriving from the French Antilles.


MDTI-WA-2021-0127
Date: 17 March 2021

RUSSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF MARCH 17, 2021

Authorities in Russia have extended the nation’s existing suspension of all commercial flights with the UK until 2359 April 16 in order to prevent the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 active in that country. Most categories of travelers from the UK may not enter Russia except for diplomats and persons holding special visas, such as Highly Qualified Specialist visas. Those travelers arriving from the UK who are permitted to enter must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Russia; aircrews are exempt from this restriction.

Aside from the UK flight suspension, international flights are operating between Russia and more than 30 countries, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, France, Germany, Italy, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Netherlands, Serbia, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, and the UAE. However, the availability of flights is still dependent on COVID-19 restrictions in destination countries. Additionally, flights with low demand could be canceled or merged with other scheduled services. Foreign air passengers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test performed no more than 72 hours prior to their departure for Russia; Russian citizens must produce a negative COVID-19 test within three days upon arrival or self-isolate for 14 days. Foreigners are not allowed entry for tourism purposes.


MDTI-WA-2021-0126
Date: 17 March 2021

MALAYSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF MARCH 17, 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.


MDTI-WA-2021-0125
Date: 17 March 2021

HONG KONG – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF MARCH 17, 2021

The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have not visited elsewhere for 21 days. Individuals arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints. Officials have barred entry for people who have stayed in designated extremely high-risk countries Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours within 21 days of departure. As of March 17, Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, the UAE, and the US as very high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from these locations and permitted travelers from extremely high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure.

Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to quarantine at a hotel for 21 days; travelers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All arriving passengers must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine, provided they test negative for COVID-19.


MDTI-WA-2021-0124
Date: 17 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 17 MARCH 2021

Switzerland: Under most circumstances, only citizens and residents of EEA countries, in addition to Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, may enter Switzerland. All individuals arriving by plane must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the previous 72 hours; all individuals arriving by plane, train, or boat are also required to fill out an entry form. Additionally, all individuals who have spent time in locations designated as high-risk within 10 days prior to arrival must fill out an entry form prior to arrival, have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within the previous 72 hours, and self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. The self-isolation period can be ended early following a negative COVID-19 test result taken on or after day seven of the self-isolation period.

Norway: All international travelers, with the exception of Norwegian citizens and legal residents, are barred from entry. Additional exemptions are in place for close family members of Norwegian residents, transport workers, individuals in transit, and foreigners who work within critical social functions. All permitted arrivals from high-risk areas must register with authorities within 72 hours before arrival and present a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 24 hours before arrival. Norwegian citizens may instead opt to be tested on arrival. Additionally, all arrivals from high-risk areas are required to isolate for 10 days on arrival. Most travelers without a permanent residence in Norway are required to complete their isolation period in a government-designated hotel. The isolation period can be ended following a negative result for a COVID-19 test taken on or after the seventh day of isolation. As of March 16, only Iceland, Greenland the Faroe Islands, and the Finnish hospital districts of Kainuu and Lansi-Pohja are not considered high-risk areas.

Ireland: Authorities in Ireland are maintaining international entry restrictions as of March 16 as part of measures to control the spread of COVID-19. Individuals arriving from high-risk or “Category-2” countries must self-isolate completely for 14-days. As of March 16, Category-2 countries include Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tanzania, UAE, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Officials are seeking to pass legislation requiring arrivals from these countries to carry out their isolation in specifically designated hotels, though it is not confirmed when this measure will come into effect. All incoming travelers must complete a passenger locator form prior to arrival and possess a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the 72 hours prior to travel. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 14 days on arrival, though this can be ended early for arrivals from non-Category-2 countries if the individual takes a COVID-19 test confirming a negative result no less than five days after arrival. Essential transport workers, individuals in transit, and travelers whose journeys originate in Northern Ireland, UK, are exempt from these requirements.

Portugal: Authorities in Portugal have issued orders extending the nation’s COVID-19-related international entry restrictions through at least March 31. The government permits entry for travelers from the EU, Schengen Area, Australia, China, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, and Thailand. Travel from other countries remains prohibited except in limited essential cases, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting for essential work or study. All permitted arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the 72 hours prior to boarding. Travelers arriving from countries with COVID-19 incidence rates of over 500 per 100,000 inhabitants must also self-isolate for 14 days on arrival.


MDTI-WA-2021-0118
Date: 12 March 2021

QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 12 MARCH 2021

All international travelers entering Australia must quarantine in government-designated facilities for 14 days in the city of arrival. Queensland charges all arriving travelers, including Australian citizens and permanent residents, for quarantine, payable at the end of their stay. Quarantine fees are AUD 2,800 (USD 2,173) for the first adult, AUD 3,710 (USD 2,879) for two adults, and AUD 4,620 (USD 3,585) for two adults and two children. Authorities require quarantined travelers to take a COVID-19 test before release. Refusal to take tests will result in an additional 10 days in quarantine.


MDTI-WA-2021-0117
Date: 12 March 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 12 MARCH 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials permit partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomats to enter without prior government consent. Authorities also allow partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country.

The government allows entry for some critical workers on special visas provided companies demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. Authorities require people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities require most inbound international passengers to test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours of departure. Exemptions are in place for travelers from Australia, Antarctica, and some Pacific island nations and territories, including the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Palau, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. Exceptions are also in effect for passengers who cannot receive a test due to medical reasons or previously recovered from COVID-19 but still return a positive test; in both instances, individuals must obtain a medical certificate certifying the information to enter the country. Authorities will accept negative COVID-19 test results for passengers whose flights get delayed 24 hours or less. Vaccinated travelers must still get tested under the new regulation and provide a medical certificate if they test positive for COVID-19. Passengers that do not meet pre-departure testing requirements may face a fine of up to NZD 1,000 (USD 723).


MDTI-WA-2021-0116
Date: 11 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 MARCH 2021

Italy: Authorities previously extended a ban on entry for persons who have visited or transited the UK within the previous 14 days until April 6. The measure, which was previously scheduled to expire March 5, does not apply to those who have been legal residents since before Dec. 23, 2020, or those traveling for an essential reason; such essential reasons must be declared in writing. Exempt travelers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19; the test must have been taken no more than 72 hours before departing for Italy. They must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival. Regardless of the test results, arrivals from the UK must report to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days. Nonresidents who have visited or transited Brazil within 14 days prior to arriving in Italy will be prohibited from entering or transiting the country. Authorities are maintaining additional international travel restrictions. Travel from outside the EEA and Schengen-associated states – with the exception of that from Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand – is currently prohibited unless conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons. All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Arrivals from the EEA and Switzerland must also have proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within the previous 48 hours; all other permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.

Netherlands: Effective March 9, authorities have lifted a ban on passenger flights and ferries from the UK. The ban was initially imposed to stem the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 originally identified in the UK; however, this strain has spread within the Netherlands to such an extent that a travel ban has no added value. Travelers from the UK are still required to present proof of a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival. Travel to the Netherlands is generally only permitted for European Economic Area (EEA) residents or Schengen-associated countries and residents of Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Officials prohibit most travel from other countries; however, effective March 9, the list of travel exemptions has been expanded to include healthcare workers, people traveling to seek medical attention, persons traveling for urgent family reasons, staff traveling to or from British or Dutch drilling platforms, air or sea crews traveling in the exercise of their work, transiting EEA or Schengen Area residents, and returning Dutch nationals and residents. All permitted travelers must possess proof of a negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival. All permitted travelers arriving via sea or air must also undergo a rapid COVID-19 test no more than four hours prior to boarding.

France: Travel is suspended to and from countries outside the EU; limited exceptions are granted for essential travel. In addition, all travelers arriving from other EU countries must provide a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure and complete a travel declaration form. Cross-border workers and freight transporters will be exempt from the testing measure. Permitted travelers arriving from outside of the EU must meet all the requirements outlined above and must also self-isolate for seven days on arrival and take a second COVID-19 test at the end of the self-isolation period.

Spain: Most international arrivals from outside the EEA remain prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, and Thailand. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, healthcare workers, and freight transport workers, as well as other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving by air must fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.


MDTI-WA-2021-0115
Date: 11 March 2021

MALAYSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 MARCH 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.


MDTI-WA-2021-0114
Date: 11 March 2021

SINGAPORE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 MARCH 2021

Most short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who do not provide essential services, remain banned from entering Singapore. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling. Passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. Foreign nationals traveling from most locations must test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip. All passengers must undergo polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests upon arrival in Singapore. People applying to enter Singapore under the ATP and Reciprocal Green Lanes (RGL) schemes must have a minimum of SGD 30,000 (USD 22,500) travel insurance for medical treatment costs should they test positive for COVID-19 in Singapore.

Arrivals from most locations must undergo a stay-home notice (SHN) for 14 days at designated facilities. Travelers who spent the previous two weeks in mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan can serve a seven-day SHN in their residence. Arrivals from Fiji, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, and Thailand can serve a two-week SHN at their residence if they fulfill some requirements, including having spent the previous 14 days in the aforementioned locations and serving SHN at the accommodation alone or with other travelers with the same travel history. Long-term pass holders and short-term travelers who have been in South Africa and the UK within the previous 14 days cannot enter Singapore. Singaporean citizens and permanent residents (PRs) with recent travel history in the UK quarantine for two weeks at dedicated SHN facilities and subsequently self-quarantine for a week at their residence. Arrivals from Australia’s New South Wales (NSW) are exempted from SHN if their on-arrival PCR test returns negative.


MDTI-WA-2021-0113
Date: 09 March 2021

CHINA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 09 MARCH 2021

China continues to ban most foreign nationals from entry. However, foreigners from most countries with valid residence permits for work, family visits, and personal matters can enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain entry permission for emergency humanitarian purposes. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters from provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Officials have also banned flights to and from the UK until further notice. Foreigners from Canada, Belgium, France, Russia, the Philippines, India, Italy, Bangladesh, the UK, Ukraine, and Ethiopia are banned, regardless of residency status. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders, generally flight and shipping crew members, regardless of country of origin, are exempt from entry bans.

Officials permit essential business travel from Singapore and South Korea under fast-track arrangements. Travel is possible between Singapore and Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces and Chongqing, Shanghai, and Tianjin. A fast-track arrangement for business travelers from South Korea to ten Chinese locations, including Shanghai and Liaoning, Shandong, Jiangsu, and Anhui provinces, is also in place. Companies or government agencies can apply for special passes for inbound visitors, who must test negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours of their departure from Singapore or within 72 hours of their departure from South Korea and obtain a visa. Passengers will undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in China and self-isolate at designated facilities (usually hotels) until their results are available. Singapore travelers must also adhere to a preplanned itinerary, refrain from using public transport – except for private hire vehicles – for the first 14 days, and download and use a health pass while in the country. Arriving passengers testing positive for COVID-19 will undergo treatment at their own expense.

Authorities require most inbound passengers to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure. Officials require all authorized inbound passengers from specified countries to provide evidence of both nucleic acid COVID-19 and IgM antibody tests from designated facilities in the departure country within 48 hours of boarding flights. Travelers from affected locations must also undergo additional COVID-19 tests in each country they transit. As of March 8, the measure applies to travelers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Denmark, Egypt, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, the UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Authorities will likely further expand the testing requirements to other countries in the coming days and weeks, possibly at short notice. Most travelers, regardless of nationality or residency, are barred from using land border crossings. Exceptions are in place for cargo transport, though backlogs remain possible at border checkpoints.


MDTI-WA-2021-0112
Date: 09 March 2021

FINLAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 09 MARCH 2021

Travelers from Vatican City, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Iceland may enter the country without restrictions. Travel from all other locations is only permitted for limited essential reasons, such as Finnish nationals and residents and their families returning home, critical work or study, individuals in transit, and other urgent reasons to be decided on a case by case basis. This measure is in place until at least March 18.

All individuals arriving from countries with which travel is restricted will be required to take a COVID-19 test upon entry unless they have evidence of a negative test taken within the previous 72 hours or evidence that they have been infected with COVID-19 in the previous six months. Arrivals are then asked to self-isolate for 14 days or until a negative test is confirmed from a second test taken no less than 72 hours after arrival. Individuals not complying with these measures may be placed into a state quarantine facility for up to 14 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0111
Date: 09 March 2021

GREECE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 09 MARCH 2021

Greece has extended domestic and international air travel restrictions that were imposed to limit the spread of COVID-19; domestic air travel restrictions have been extended until 0600 March 16 and international air travel restrictions have been extended until 0600 March 22. Under the domestic restrictions, only essential trips are permitted, such as those for healthcare, family responsibilities, essential business, or to return to a permanent residence. Under the international air travel restrictions, entry is prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exceptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Russia, Thailand, the UAE, and the UK are also exempt from the travel ban. Rwanda and Singapore have been removed from the list of exempted countries. Flights connecting with Turkey remain suspended.

All international arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival, and self-isolate for seven days upon arrival. All incoming travelers must complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form; individuals will be subject to COVID-19 tests upon landing based on their Passenger Locator Form information. All arrivals from the UAE must submit to a rapid antigen test upon arrival. All arrivals from the UK must submit to a rapid antigen test upon arrival, self-isolate for seven days, and take a PCR test after their isolation period.


MDTI-WA-2021-0110
Date: 08 March 2021

BRUNEI – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 MARCH 2021

Most foreign nationals, including long-term pass holders, remain banned from entering or transiting Brunei. Existing travel, student, and dependent visas remain suspended, with limited exceptions. People who can enter Brunei must test for COVID-19 before departure and upon arrival. Arrivals must quarantine 2-14 days at designated premises, depending on the risk level of the country of departure. Travelers can leave the isolation sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. Authorities will consider appeals from foreigners in special situations, such as those on scholarship studies or undergoing medical treatment in Brunei, to enter the country. Foreigners permitted entry in such cases must obtain a Bruneian citizen or entity as a guarantor.

A ban on persons traveling for business and transporters of nonessential goods from traveling or transiting by land and sea remains in effect as of March 8. Exemptions are in place for transport workers of essential goods, emergency service workers and patients, and people on government affairs, among others. Transport operators who cross the borders frequently must undergo a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) weekly.

Brunei allows travel for business and official purposes with Singapore in a so-called Reciprocal Green Lane scheme. For travelers from Singapore, a Bruneian host company or government agency must apply for the employee’s travel pass and controlled itinerary for the first 14 days in Brunei. The travelers must have remained in Singapore for 14 days before travel, obtain a visa if applicable, purchase a return flight ticket, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before departure, and download the BruHealth contact tracing application. Upon arrival, the employees must test for COVID-19, remain in their pre-approved accommodation place until the test returns negative, and adhere to a controlled itinerary.


MDTI-WA-2021-0109
Date: 08 March 2021

JAPAN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 MARCH 2021

The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; however, officials permit foreigners to enter under special circumstances. Authorities will likely continue to prohibit business travel from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea through the state of emergency period.

Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days. Entrants who cannot receive testing before departure and individuals arriving from designated countries must quarantine at a government-designated facility for three days and undergo COVID-19 testing before completing the remainder of the 14-day self-quarantine period. As of March 5, the quarantine requirement applies to travelers from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the United Arab Emirates. Returning residents must complete a pledge to abide by quarantine orders, maintain location data on their mobile phones, and refrain from using public transport during the first 14 days in the country. People that refuse may have to quarantine at designated facilities. Officials could publicly name citizens and foreign residents who violate quarantine orders; foreign nationals could also lose their residence status.


MDTI-WA-2021-0108
Date: 08 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 MARCH 2021

Italy: Authorities have extended a ban on entry for persons who have visited or transited the UK within the previous 14 days until April 6. The measure, which was previously scheduled to expire March 5, does not apply to those who have been legal residents since before Dec. 23, 2020, or those traveling for an essential reason; such essential reasons must be declared in writing. Exempt travelers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19; the test must have been taken no more than 72 hours before departing for Italy. They must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival. Regardless of the test results, arrivals from the UK must report to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days. Nonresidents who have visited or transited Brazil within 14 days prior to arriving in Italy will be prohibited from entering or transiting the country.

Authorities are maintaining additional international travel restrictions. Travel from outside the EEA and Schengen-associated states – with the exception of that from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand – is currently prohibited unless conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons. All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Arrivals from the EEA and Switzerland must also have proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within the previous 48 hours; all other permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.

United Kingdom: Effective March 8, authorities will require all outbound international travelers leaving the UK from England to complete a travel declaration attesting that the trip falls under the categories of travel that are permitted in accordance with current COVID-19 restrictions. Travelers who do not possess such a document may be denied access to their flight and could be fined up to GBP 200 (USD 270). Persons traveling to Ireland are exempt from the requirement. Travel declarations are not required for international travel originating from Northern Ireland, Scotland, or Wales. Otherwise, international entry restrictions in the UK remain largely unchanged. All international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crews, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria, as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt

Spain: Authorities in Spain are tightening COVID-19-related entry restrictions for certain travelers beginning March 8. The measures, which will remain in effect until at least March 22, will require travelers from Peru, Brazil, Colombia, Botswana, Comoros, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe who have already been allowed to enter the country to self-isolate for 10 days upon entry. The quarantine can be ended with a negative COVID-19 test taken on the 7th day of self-isolation. Flight crews are exempt from the measure. Most international arrivals from outside the EEA remain prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, and Thailand. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, healthcare workers, and freight transport workers, as well as other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving by air must fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.


MDTI-WA-2021-0108
Date: 05 March 2021

INDONESIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 MARCH 2021

The entry ban for most foreigners remains in effect due to concerns over a new COVID-19 variant. Exemptions from the entry ban are in place for high-level state visits and holders of Limited Stay Permit Cards, among others; the government’s level of enforcement is unclear.

Returning Indonesian citizens and foreigners who can still enter the country must present evidence that they have tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours before departure, register on the eHAC mobile application before the trips, quarantine for five days at designated facilities upon arrival, and obtain a negative result from another COVID-19 test before leaving the isolation premises. All international travelers are also encouraged to download the PeduliLindungi contact-tracing application.


MDTI-WA-2021-0107
Date: 05 March 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 MARCH 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials permit partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomats to enter without prior government consent. Authorities also allow partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country.

The government allows entry for some critical workers on special visas provided companies demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. Authorities require people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.


MDTI-WA-2021-0106
Date: 05 March 2021

CAMBODIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 MARCH 2021

Officials are imposing strict entry and exit restrictions in Preah Sihanouk Province as of March 5 until further notice due to COVID-19 concerns. Exemptions are in place for ambulances and transport of goods, among others. Only two people can be in each vehicle transporting goods. Officials require people to implement health protocols, such as wearing facemasks when in public. Additionally, authorities continue to suspend schools in the province as of March 5; the policy’s end date is unclear. Nonessential gatherings are discouraged.


MDTI-WA-2021-0105
Date: 05 March 2021

MALDIVES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 MARCH 2021

International arrivals must submit an online health declaration via the “Imuga” portal within 24 hours before travel and produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a RT-PCR test taken within 96 hours before departure. Inbound foreign travelers must reserve accommodations at approved lodging establishments; split stays between facilities must be approved by the Ministry of Tourism at least two days before departure. Maldivian nationals and permanent residents must undergo a 10-day home quarantine. Passengers who have spent at least 12 hours in the UK in the past 14 days must also undergo quarantine. Quarantined individuals typically undergo COVID-19 tests on the fifth and tenth day. Some testing and quarantine exemptions apply for arriving international travelers whose medical histories show they have recovered from COVID-19. Any person staying for over 48 hours in the Greater Male region requires a pre-departure COVID-19 test within 72 hours before leaving the Maldives. Authorities have advised Maldivian citizens to refrain from all nonessential international travel.


MDTI-WA-2021-0104
Date: 05 March 2021

BRAZIL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 MARCH 2021

Restrictions for travelers entering Brazil remain largely unchanged as compared with those in force during the last week of February. A ban on entry for nonresident travelers who have been in South Africa or the UK within the 14 days prior to arrival remains in effect. Citizens and legal residents of Brazil who have traveled through those two countries within the past 14 days will be permitted to repatriate; however, they must complete a two-week quarantine upon arrival. Travelers entering Brazil by air from other destinations must present a negative result from a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction test (RT-PCR) taken no more than 72 hours before travel and must complete a pre-arrival health form. Foreign citizens are allowed to enter Brazil by air for visits of no longer than 90 days.

Nonresident foreign nationals remain prohibited from entering the country by land and water. Brazilian citizens, permanent residents, and their immediate family members, as well as foreign residents working for international organizations or foreign governments or traveling for trade or humanitarian purposes, are exempt from the ban. Apart from the overarching land border closures and as part of a joint agreement, the land border crossings with Paraguay – specifically those at Foz do Iguacu, Ponta Pora, and Mundo Novo – are open.


MDTI-WA-2021-0103
Date: 05 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 MARCH 2021

Netherlands: Authorities in the Netherlands have extended a ban on flights with the UK, South Africa, and many countries in Central and South America until at least April 1 due to concerns related to variant strains of COVID-19 in those countries. The targeted locations in the Americas currently include Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The ban also applies to passenger ferries from the UK; freight workers are exempt from this measure but must they must take a rapid antigen test within 24 hours prior to travel.

Travel to the Netherlands is generally only permitted for European Economic Area (EEA) residents or Schengen-associated countries and residents of Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Officials prohibit most travel from other countries except for transit and limited essential purposes, including urgent health and family reasons.

All permitted travelers must possess proof of a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival. All permitted travelers arriving via sea or air must also undergo a rapid COVID-19 test no more than four hours prior to boarding. Authorities will not accept results from self-administered tests. Transit passengers are also subject to this requirement. Aircrews must undergo a rapid antigen test upon disembarking. Other transport sector workers must undergo a rapid antigen test no more than 24 hours prior to departure. Additionally, all travelers must fill out a declaration form prior to entry and self-isolate for 10 days on arrival; this can be shortened by taking a COVID-19 test on or after day five of the self-isolation period. These measures do not apply to individuals arriving from Iceland, the Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand; additional exceptions are possible for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats.

Luxembourg: Authorities in Luxembourg are maintaining the nation’s domestic and international entry restrictions as of March 4 as part of efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19. Travelers from countries within the European Union or Schengen Area, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and Vatican City as well as residents of Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand are permitted to enter Luxembourg. Most travelers from other countries, including the UK, remain prohibited, though exceptions are in place for essential work, study, and family reasons. Individuals arriving from the UK in possession of a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within the previous 48-72 hours must take a further test on arrival and self-isolate until the result has been confirmed. Luxembourg requires all incoming international air travelers to present documentation proving that they have tested negative for COVID-19. The negative result must be from a nucleic acid or rapid antigen test taken no more than 72 hours prior to the flight’s departure and be presented at boarding. Transporters and aircraft crew members are exempt. In addition, all travelers arriving by air from a country that is not a member of the EU or the Schengen Area must undergo an additional rapid test upon arrival.

France: Travel is suspended from and to countries outside the EU. Limited exceptions are granted for essential travel. In addition, all travelers arriving from other EU countries must provide a negative result from COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure and complete a travel declaration form. Cross-border workers and freight transporters will be exempt from the testing measure. Permitted travelers arriving from outside of the EU must meet all the requirements outlined above and must also self-isolate for seven days on arrival and take a second COVID-19 test at the end of the self-isolation period.


MDTI-WA-2021-0102
Date: 04 March 2021

ISRAEL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 04 MARCH 2021

Authorities in Israel have issued orders that will ease COVID-19-related international entry restrictions slightly over the coming days. Effective March 7, up to 3,000 Israeli citizens will be allowed to enter the country daily. Israelis returning from abroad will be required to quarantine at home in accordance with instructions from the Health Ministry; people who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 or who have recovered from the disease are exempt from the quarantine requirement provided they test negative for COVID-19. Israelis who are unable to quarantine at home will be required to quarantine in government-designated facilities. Furthermore, Israeli nationals who have been vaccinated will be permitted to travel abroad on authorized flights; unvaccinated citizens will be required to apply for permission to leave the country. A ban on entry by foreign nationals remains in effect until further notice; however, in exceptional cases, foreigners may be granted a special entry permit.

All inbound and outbound international passenger flights at Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion Airport (TLV) remain suspended through March 6 in an effort to combat the spread of new COVID-19 strains. During this period, the government is only allowing travel to and from Israel in exceptional cases subject to approval by a committee of health and transportation officials. The closures apply to both foreigners and Israeli nationals.

The government has also extended through March 5 an existing directive that requires all arriving international travelers to quarantine at government-designated facilities. The quarantine period is for 14 days but may be reduced to 10 days contingent upon two negative COVID-19 tests. Only travelers with certificates demonstrating that they have been vaccinated against or recovered from COVID-19 are exempt from the quarantine requirement.


MDTI-WA-2021-0101
Date: 04 March 2021

GREECE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 MARCH 2021

The Greek government has also extended the nation’s entry restrictions until at least March 8. All international arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival, and self-isolate for seven days upon arrival. All incoming travelers must complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form; individuals will be subject to COVID-19 tests upon landing based on their Passenger Locator Form information. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a PCR test after seven days of self-isolation. Any traveler testing positive for COVID-19 must self-isolate for at least 14 days.

Entry remains prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exceptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Russia, Thailand, the UAE, and the UK are also exempt from the travel ban. Flights connecting with Turkey remain suspended. Additionally, all land border crossings – with the exception of the Promachonas crossing with Bulgaria – remain closed to nonessential traffic. All travelers entering from the Kakavia crossing with Albania, and Evzones border crossings with North Macedonia will be subjected to a rapid COVID-19 test and must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival unless they are transiting, in which case they are not required to self-isolate. Domestic flight restrictions, which prohibit nonessential travel, have been extended until March 8. Only essential trips, such as those for healthcare, family responsibilities, essential business, or to return to a permanent residence, are permitted.


MDTI-WA-2021-0100
Date: 04 March 2021

GERMANY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 MARCH 2021

Authorities in Germany have extended an existing ban on direct passenger transport with so-called “virus variant areas,” i.e., locations deemed to be at increased risk of infection from a novel variant of COVID-19. The directive will remain in effect until at least March 17. As of March 3, Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Portugal, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Tyrol in Austria, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries are designated virus variant areas. Entry from these areas is restricted to German nationals and residents, as well as certain essential workers; all permitted arrivals must provide a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within the previous 48 hours if requested by authorities. Border officials are conducting random checks on private vehicles entering the country from virus variant areas that share a border with Germany.

Other international entry restrictions also remain in force as of March 3. Most travel from outside the EEA, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, is prohibited. Exceptions are in place for EU nationals or residents and their family members, individuals carrying out essential work, or individuals traveling for urgent reasons. Permitted individuals arriving from a “risk area” must self-isolate for at least 10 days on arrival; this quarantine can be ended early following a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken on or after the fifth day. Permitted individuals who have spent any time in a “high-incidence area” in the previous 10 days must meet the same self-isolation requirements in addition to presenting proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the 48 hours prior to travel.


MDTI-WA-2021-0098
Date: 03 March 2021

ITALY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 03 MARCH 2021

Authorities are also maintaining international travel restrictions. Travel from outside the EEA and Schengen-associated states – with the exception of that from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand – is currently prohibited unless conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons. All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Arrivals from the EEA and Switzerland must also have proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within the previous 48 hours; all other permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.

In addition, until at least March 5, persons who have visited or transited the UK within 14 days prior to arriving in Italy will be barred from entering the country unless they have been legal residents since prior to Dec. 23, 2020, or are traveling for an essential reason; such essential reasons must be declared in writing. Such travelers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19; the test must have been taken no more than 72 hours before departing for Italy. They must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival. Regardless of the test results, arrivals from the UK must report to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days. Travelers who have visited or transited Brazil within 14 days prior to arriving in Italy will be prohibited from entering or transiting the country.


MDTI-WA-2021-0097
Date: 03 March 2021

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 03 MARCH 2021

Emirati authorities are maintaining several COVID-19 restrictions as of March 2. Authorities in Dubai Emirate require UAE residents, Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) citizens, and visitors traveling to Dubai to take a pre-travel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, regardless of the country from which they are arriving. The PCR test must be taken within 72 hours of arrival. Arrivals from some countries may be required to undergo an additional test on landing in Dubai.

Some arrivals in Abu Dhabi must isolate for at least 10 days. Arrivals from other countries as listed on the Abu Dhabi government website will not be required to isolate. A PCR test must be carried out 48 or 72 hours before your flight, even if transiting. Additional tests may be carried out on arrival. Testing requirements differ depending on whether a traveler has to quarantine or not. Arrivals into Abu Dhabi are required to wear a medically approved wristband for the duration of their quarantine.

Other measures in effect in the UAE include:
– All travelers to the UAE must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result before their departure. Upon arrival at all airports in the UAE, stringent entry restrictions are enforced and may include a PCR test on arrival, a health declaration form, health insurance with COVID-19 coverage, a mandatory quarantine period for at least 10 days (except Dubai), and follow-up testing before the completion of quarantine.
– Visitors can travel to Abu Dhabi by road but must have had a negative COVID-19 PCR test before travel. There is also a requirement for further testing if visitors and residents remain in Abu Dhabi for four days or longer. The rules for entering and remaining in Abu Dhabi via road change regularly. Regularly updated requirements can be found on the Abu Dhabi government website.
– Tourists traveling to Dubai are required to complete a health declaration form and quarantine form.
– Tourists must have international health insurance before traveling. Tourists who test positive for COVID-19 must register on the COVID-19 DXB app and quarantine at a facility provided by the government for at least 10 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0096
Date: 03 March 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 03 MARCH 2021

Japan: The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country due to concerns over new COVID-19 variants. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; officials do, however, permit foreigners to enter under special circumstances. Authorities will continue to prohibit business travel from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea until at least March 7.

Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within the 72 hours prior to departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days. Entrants who cannot receive testing before departure, as well as individuals arriving from certain designated countries, must quarantine at a government-designated facility for three days and undergo COVID-19 testing before completing the remainder of the 14-day self-quarantine period. Returning residents must complete a pledge to abide by quarantine orders, maintain location data on their mobile phones, and refrain from using public transport during the first 14 days in the country. Persons who do not agree may have to quarantine at designated facilities. Officials could publicly name citizens and foreign residents who violate quarantine orders; foreign nationals could also lose their residence status.

Vietnam: Most foreigners remain banned from entering Vietnam. Exceptions are in place for foreign experts, investors, managers, skilled workers, and resident diplomats, among others. All passengers must quarantine at centralized facilities for 14 days upon entry into the country. Authorities may make limited exceptions for special diplomatic cases; it is unclear whether exemptions are also in place for individuals entering Vietnam under bilateral travel arrangements. Inbound commercial flights remain suspended until further notice. Charter flights may operate on a case-by-case basis to transport Vietnamese citizens and foreign nationals who are allowed to enter the country. Authorities have banned flights from South Africa and the UK due to new COVID-19 variants in those two countries. Officials require people who can still enter Vietnam to test negative for COVID-19 within five days before the travel date.

Malaysia: Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions. Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.

Hong Kong: The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have not visited elsewhere for 21 days. Individuals arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints. Officials have barred entry for people who have stayed in designated extremely high-risk countries Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours within 21 days of departure. As of March 3, Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, the UAE, and the US as very high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from these locations and permitted travelers from extremely high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure. Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to quarantine at a hotel for 21 days; travelers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All arriving passengers must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine, provided they test negative for COVID-19.


MDTI-WA-2021-0096
Date: 02 March 2021

TURKEY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 MARCH 2021

A set of international travel restrictions also remains in force in Turkey as of March 1. All international travelers arriving by air, land, or sea must produce a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result taken no more than 72 hours prior to their flight’s or ferry’s scheduled departure. Any traveler unable to submit a negative test result at the point of departure will not be allowed to board; persons arriving in Turkey without proof of having tested negative will be required to quarantine either at their reported address in Turkey or at a government-designated facility.


MDTI-WA-2021-0095
Date: 02 March 2021

MACAU – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 MARCH 2021

Authorities continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau; exceptions are in place for some foreigners related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers. Residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan and returning Macau citizens from these locations can enter the territory if they have not been to any other places in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China only need to submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days of their arrival. However, officials require travelers from medium- and high-risk areas of mainland China to quarantine for 14 days at designated hotels. Affected travelers must also participate in “self-health management,” which entails restricting travel to work or school, wearing a facemask in public, and twice-daily temperature checks, for an additional 14 days. As of March 1, officials are not classifying any location in mainland China as medium or high risk. The government could adjust the list of affected areas at short notice.


MDTI-WA-2021-0094
Date: 01 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 MARCH 2021

Ireland: Authorities in Ireland tightened international entry restrictions introduced to combat the spread of COVID-19 Feb. 26 by adding further countries to the list of high risk or “Category 2” countries. Individuals arriving from these countries must observe a complete 14-day self-isolation period. As of Feb. 26, Category 2 countries include Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Eswatini, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tanzania, UAE, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Health officials are currently passing legislation to require arrivals from these countries to carry out their isolation in specifically designated hotels, though it is not confirmed when this measure will come into effect. All incoming travelers are required to fill out a passenger locator form prior to arrival and possess proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the 72 hours prior to travel in order to be permitted entry. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 14 days on arrival, though this can be ended early for arrivals from non-Category 2 countries if the individual takes a COVID-19 test confirming a negative result no less than five days after arrival. Essential transport workers and individuals in transit are exempt from these requirements.

Germany: Authorities are maintaining other international entry restrictions as of March 1. Most travel from outside of the EEA, with the exception of Australia New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand is prohibited. Exceptions are in place for EU nationals or residents and their family members, individuals carrying out essential work, or individuals traveling for urgent reasons. Permitted individuals arriving from a “risk area” must self-isolate for at least 10 days on arrival; this can be ended early following a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken on or after the fifth day of self-isolation. Permitted individuals who have spent any time in a “particularly high risk area” in the previous 10 days must meet the same self-isolation requirements in addition to presenting proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the 48 hours prior to travel.

Spain: Most international arrivals from outside the EEA remain prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, and Thailand. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, healthcare workers, and freight transport workers, as well as other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving by air must fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

Belgium: Authorities have banned all nonessential travel to and from Belgium; the measures apply to all road, air, sea, and rail traffic. Exceptions include travel for compelling family reasons, humanitarian reasons, study purposes, commuting by cross-border workers, professional purposes, and emergency reasons, such as animal care, emergency vehicle repairs, and moving. All permitted arrivals staying in Belgium for more than 48 hours must complete a Passenger Locator Form within the 48 hours before arrival, fill in and carry a sworn statement confirming the essential nature of their travel, and possess a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours before departing for Belgium. Based on answers given in the Passenger Locator Form, health officials may contact travelers and require them to self-isolate for at least seven days; currently, only travelers from Denmark, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Norway, and overseas territories of France and Portugal may not be required to self-isolate on arrival.


MDTI-WA-2021-0093
Date: 01 March 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 01 MARCH 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials permit partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomats to enter without prior government consent. Authorities also allow partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country.

The government allows entry for some critical workers on special visas provided companies demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. Authorities require people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.


MDTI-WA-2021-0092
Date: 01 March 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 01 MARCH 2021

Norway: Authorities in Norway are continuing to impose restrictions to combat the spread of COVID-19 as of Feb. 26. All international travelers, with the exception of Norwegian citizens and legal residents, are barred from entry. Additional exemptions are in place for close family members of Norwegian residents, transport workers, individuals in transit, journalists, and foreigners who work within critical social functions. All permitted arrivals from high-risk areas must register with authorities within 72 hours before arrival and present proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 24 hours before arrival. Norwegian citizens may instead opt to be tested on arrival. Additionally, all arrivals from high-risk areas are required to isolate for 10 days on arrival. Most travelers without a permanent residence in Norway are required to complete their isolation period in a government-designated hotel. The isolation period can be ended following a negative result for a COVID-19 test taken on or after the seventh day of isolation. As of Feb. 26, only Greenland, Iceland, and the Finnish hospital districts of Central Ostrobothnia, South Ostrobothnia, Kainuu, North-Savo, South-Savo, and North Karelia are not considered high-risk areas.

France: Travel is suspended from and to countries outside the EU. Limited exceptions will be granted for essential travel. In addition, all travelers arriving from the EU will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure and complete a travel declaration form. Cross-border workers and freight transporters will be exempt from the testing measure. Permitted travelers arriving from outside of the EU must meet all the requirements outlined above and must also self-isolate for seven days on arrival and take a second COVID-19 test at the end of the self-isolation period.

Greece: The Greek government has also extended the nation’s entry restrictions until at least March 8. All international arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival, and self-isolate for seven days upon arrival. All incoming travelers must complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form; individuals will be subject to COVID-19 tests upon landing based on their Passenger Locator Form information. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test after 7 days of self-isolation. Any traveler testing positive for COVID-19 must self-isolate for at least 14 days.

Entry remains prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exceptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Russia, Thailand, the UAE, and the UK are also exempt from the travel ban. Flights connecting with Turkey remain suspended. Additionally, all land border crossings – with the exception of the Promachonas crossing with Bulgaria – remain closed to nonessential traffic. Domestic flight restrictions, which prohibit nonessential travel, have been extended until March 1. Only essential trips, such as those for healthcare, family responsibilities, essential business, or to return to a permanent residence, are permitted.


MDTI-WA-2021-0091
Date: 01 March 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 26 FEBRUARY 2021

South Korea: Government continues to suspend visa-free and visa-waiver programs with countries that have banned entry for South Korean citizens and for travelers with short-term visas issued before April 5, 2020. South Korean residents, including long-term visa holders, can enter the country. Most foreign residents must obtain permits before departing South Korea to facilitate any planned re-entry. All permitted foreign nationals must submit a negative result from a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to departure. South Koreans traveling from African nations, the UK, South Africa, and Brazil must submit a negative COVID-19 test result to enter the country. Most flights from the UK remain banned through at least March 11 due to concerns over new variants of COVID-19. Flights from South Korea to the UK can continue to operate, though service disruptions are likely.

Japan: The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country due to a new COVID-19 variant. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; officials will permit other foreigners’ entry under special circumstances. Authorities will continue to prohibit business travel from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea until at least March 7.

Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within the 72 hours prior to departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days. Entrants that cannot receive testing before departure, as well as permitted arrivals from the UK and South Africa, must quarantine at a government-designated facility for three days and undergo COVID-19 testing before completing the remainder of the 14-day self-quarantine period. Returning residents must complete a pledge to abide by quarantine orders, maintain location data on their mobile phones, and refrain from using public transport during the first 14 days in the country. Persons who do not agree may have to quarantine at designated facilities. Officials could publicly name citizens and foreign residents who violate quarantine orders; foreign nationals could also lose their residence status.

India: Authorities are advising Indian citizens to delay all nonessential international travel. Officials allow persons of all nationalities to enter the country through open land, sea, or air routes on any visa type other than tourism. Indian consulates will issue new visas upon approval; authorities will also consider existing visas – except electronic, medical, and tourist categories – as valid. Foreign nationals already in the country can apply online to avail of a free visa extension valid for 30 days after regular international commercial flights resume. International passengers must register online through the Air Suvidha portal and upload negative results of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for COVID-19 taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure. No quarantine is mandated for asymptomatic arrivals; officials are advising self-monitoring for 14 days. Due to concerns about COVID-19 variants, those with travel history to Europe, Middle East, and the UK in the past 14 days must also undergo additional self-paid on-arrival COVID-19 testing. Travelers from these nations who test negative for COVID-19 on arrival – except for those from Brazil, South Africa, and the UK – must self-monitor their health for 14 days; however, passengers from Brazil, South Africa, and the UK who test negative must quarantine for seven days at their residence and undergo further testing. Those with a positive result at any point must undergo institutional quarantine. States may impose further restrictions on travelers from specified high-risk locations.

Myanmar: Authorities have suspended all international flights through May 31. It is unclear whether the government provides any exemptions from the policy. Prior to the suspension, officials required people who are entering Myanmar to quarantine for seven days in their country of origin and test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trips, quarantine for another seven days at a government facility, and undergo another COVID-19 test upon arrival in Myanmar, and then self-quarantine for another seven days at their residence. Visa-on-arrival and e-visa services remain suspended.

Thailand: Limited inbound tourist flights are operating. Cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft can continue operating. Thai authorities are allowing travelers from 56 locations to enter the country without visas. Passengers must still obtain a Certificate of Entry from a Thai embassy if they are foreigners, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip, provide evidence of a quarantine facility booking, and isolate for two weeks at the designated facilities upon arrival. Officials have increased the length of visas from 30 to 45 days. The 56 locations are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. People from all other locations must still obtain a special tourist visa to enter Thailand; these travelers must also quarantine at designated facilities for two weeks upon arrival.


MDTI-WA-2021-0090
Date: 26 February 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 26 FEBRUARY 2021

Netherlands: Authorities previously tightened international entry restrictions. International travelers intending to arrive via air or sea must undergo a COVID-19 rapid antigen test no more than four hours prior to boarding their flight or ferry. Authorities will not accept results from self-administered tests. Transit passengers are also subject to this requirement. Air crews must undergo a rapid antigen test upon disembarking. Other transport sector workers must undergo a rapid antigen test up to 24 hours prior to departure. Rapid antigen tests are required in addition to negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test results, which are required for most travelers arriving by air, sea, or land; the test must be taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure. All arrivals, including Dutch nationals, must also fill out a negative test declaration form prior to travel. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival; this can be shortened by taking a COVID-19 test on or after day five of the self-isolation period. These measures do not apply to individuals arriving from Iceland, China, the Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand; additional exceptions are possible for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats.

Spain:The Spanish government has extended an existing ban on travelers from the UK, Brazil, and South Africa entering the country until at least March 16 due to concerns over variant strains of COVID-19 discovered in those countries. The entry prohibition does not apply to residents and nationals of Spain and Andorra. Passengers in transit to non-Schengen countries are also exempt, provided they are scheduled to be in Spain less than 24 hours and remain in the airport transit area. Spain’s current closure of its border with Portugal to nonessential travelers remains in force until at least March 1. Most international arrivals from outside the EEA are prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, and Thailand. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, healthcare workers, and freight transport workers, as well as other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving by air must fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

Finland: Authorities are maintaining a number of international entry restrictions. Accordingly, only travelers from Vatican City, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Iceland may enter the country without restrictions. Travel remains prohibited from all other countries outside the EU and Schengen Area, as well as Andorra, San Marino, and Monaco, except for returning residents and persons arriving for critical work-related or essential family reasons, until at least March 18. Travel with the EU and Schengen Area, as well as Andorra, Monaco, and San Marino, is permitted for limited essential purposes only; individuals traveling to Finland from the EU or Schengen Area must present a form confirming an essential reason for the visit when crossing the border. Exemptions are made for Finnish nationals and their family members, students, individuals in transit, and for urgent health or family reasons. Border communities along the border with Sweden and Norway are no longer exempt from entry restrictions.

Switzerland: International entry restrictions remain in force. Under most circumstances, only citizens and residents of EEA countries, in addition to Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand, may enter Switzerland. All individuals arriving by plane are required to present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the previous 72 hours; all individuals arriving by plane, train, or boat are also required to fill out an entry form. The quarantine requirement does not apply to essential individuals traveling for business or medical purposes or to transit travelers who have spent fewer than 24 hours in a high-risk country or territory. Other permitted travelers may enter without restrictions. All international travelers arriving by air, boat, bus, or rail must complete an online form on entry.


MDTI-WA-2021-0089
Date: 26 February 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 26 FEBRUARY 2021

Taiwan: The government continues to ban entry for most nonresident foreigners. Prior to traveling to Taiwan, all incoming passengers must submit proof that they have suitable accommodations for quarantine. Travelers planning to quarantine at home must sign an affidavit confirming they meet the one-person-per-residence requirements. Inbound travel for tourism and social reasons remains banned. All arrivals must undergo a COVID-19 test at their own expense before their release from quarantine. Officials require most inbound passengers, including Taiwan citizens and residents, to present a negative RT-PCR COVID-19 test obtained within three business days before departure. Exceptions to testing requirements are possible in emergency situations, but passengers receiving them must pay for a COVID-19 test upon arrival. All travelers seeking exemptions to pre-departure testing must provide supporting documents or face penalties.

South Korea: South Korea continues to suspend visa-free and visa-waiver programs with countries that have banned entry for South Korean citizens and travelers with short-term visas issued before April 5, 2020. South Korean residents, including long-term visa holders, can enter the country. Most foreign residents must obtain permits before departing South Korea to reenter. However, diplomats, government officials, overseas Korean visa holders, and travelers that left the country before May 31, 2020, are exempt from the requirement. All permitted foreign nationals must submit a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure. South Koreans traveling from African nations, the UK, South Africa, and Brazil must also submit a negative COVID-19 test result to enter the country.

Brunei: Most foreign nationals, including long-term pass holders, remain banned from entering or transiting Brunei. Existing travel, student, and dependent visas remain suspended, with limited exceptions. People who can enter Brunei must test for COVID-19 before departure and upon arrival. Arrivals must quarantine between 2-14 days at government-designated facilities, depending on the risk level of the country of departure. Travelers can leave the isolation sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. Authorities will consider appeals from foreigners in special situations, such as those on scholarship studies or undergoing medical treatment in Brunei, to enter the country. Foreigners permitted entry in such cases must obtain a Bruneian citizen or entity as a guarantor.


MDTI-WA-2021-0088
Date: 23 February 2021

TURKEY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 23 FEBRUARY 2021

All international travelers arriving by air, land, or sea must produce proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result taken no more than 72 hours prior to their flight or ferry’s scheduled departure. Any traveler unable to submit a negative test result at the point of departure will not be allowed to board their flight; persons arriving in Turkey without proof of having tested negative will be required to quarantine either at their reported address in Turkey or at a government-designated facility. This directive will remain in force through at least March 1.

Additionally, all flights to/from the UK, Denmark, Brazil, and South Africa remain indefinitely suspended in response to discoveries of variant strains of COVID-19 in these countries. All travelers who have visited the UK, Denmark, Brazil, or South Africa within the 10 days prior to their arrival in Turkey will be quarantined for 14 days in a government-selected facility. Travelers are required to undergo a second COVID-19 test – in addition to the test taken prior to departure – after 10 days and may leave quarantine following a negative result. Humanitarian, cargo, repatriation, and emergency medical flights are exempt from the suspension; other flights may be exempted at the discretion of the Ministry of Health.


MDTI-WA-2021-0087
Date: 23 February 2021

FRANCE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 23 FEBRUARY 2021

Travel is suspended from and to countries outside the EU. Limited exceptions will be granted for essential travel. In addition, all travelers arriving from the EU will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure and complete a travel declaration form. Cross-border workers and freight transporters will be exempt from the testing measure. Permitted travelers arriving from outside of the EU must meet all the requirements outlined above and must also self-isolate for seven days on arrival and take a second COVID-19 test at the end of the self-isolation period.


MDTI-WA-2021-0086
Date: 23 February 2021

UNITED KINGDOM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 23 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities are maintaining international entry restrictions as of Feb. 22 as part of efforts to control the spread of COVID-19. All international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crews, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria, as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt.

All international arrivals from outside the British Isles and Ireland must undergo 10-days’ quarantine during which they must take two additional COVID-19 tests. Arrivals must take the tests on the second and eighth days of their mandatory 10-day quarantine. In addition, all travelers returning from COVID-19 hotspots must quarantine for 10 days in a government-designated hotel at the traveler’s own expense. This mandate applies to permitted arrivals from more than 30 countries, including the UAE, Portugal, South Africa, and all South American countries.


MDTI-WA-2021-0085
Date: 23 February 2021

CAMBODIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 23 FEBRUARY 2021

Cambodia is accepting online applications for short-term travel visas as of Feb. 22 amid ongoing COVID-19 restrictions. Only people with essential reasons, like working with a Cambodian entity, can apply for the visas; the issuance of tourist visas, visa-on-arrival services, and visa-free travel remain suspended. People who apply for short-term travel visas must provide proof of medical insurance coverage of at least USD 50,000, a medical certificate from local health authorities issued within 72 hours before travel stating the individual is free from COVID-19, and supporting documents as evidence of the essential travel reasons. The short-term visas will be valid for three months and allow 30 days of stay.

Travelers must take COVID-19 tests upon arrival and quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated facility. Inbound foreign nationals must pay a USD 2,000 deposit to cover costs, including USD 100 for COVID-19 testing and USD 30 for a certificate stating that they are free from the virus; only limited exceptions are allowed. Cambodia’s suspension of flights from Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines remains in effect.


MDTI-WA-2021-0084
Date: 23 February 2021

TAIWAN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 23 FEBRUARY 2021

The government has banned entry for most nonresident foreigners and suspended transit flights due to COVID-19 concerns. Prior to departing for Taiwan, all incoming passengers must submit proof that they have suitable accommodations for quarantine. Travelers planning to quarantine at home must sign an affidavit confirming they meet the one-person-per-residence requirements. Inbound travel for tourism and social reasons remains banned.

Officials permit foreign nationals possessing Alien Resident Certificates (ARCs), as well as Hong Kong and Macau citizens with residence permits, to enter the island without a negative COVID-19 test. Foreign nationals may be allowed to enter Taiwan if they are the spouse or underage child of a Taiwan citizen and for diplomatic, humanitarian, and contractual reasons. Foreign nationals must apply for a special entry permit with their local Taiwan representative office.

Officials require most inbound passengers, including Taiwan citizens and residents, to present a negative RT-PCR COVID-19 test obtained within three business days before departure. Individuals with ARCs who cannot obtain a test are exempt from the rule. The CECC also grants exceptions for short-term travelers departing and returning to Taiwan within three days, children under six years old, and passengers with old test results due to flight cancellations or delays. Exceptions are possible in emergency situations, but passengers receiving them must pay for a COVID-19 test upon arrival. All travelers seeking exemptions to pre-departure testing must provide supporting documents or face penalties.


MDTI-WA-2021-0083
Date: 22 February 2021

CANADA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 22 FEBRUARY 2021

A ban on entering Canada remains in force for most nonresident foreign nationals, those allowed to enter are required to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country can enter, as well as immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay.

If you are allowed to travel to Canada, starting Feb. 22 all those arriving by land or air will be required to take a COVID-19 molecular test on arrival and toward the end of their 14-day quarantine period. Land ports of entry with onsite testing will include Douglas (British Columbia), Coutts (Alberta), Queenston-Lewiston Bridge (Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario), Saint Bernard de Lacolle (Highway 15, Quebec), and Saint Stephen 3rd Bridge (New Brunswick). An additional 11 sites will be available from March 4. Additionally, travelers arriving by land or air will be required to electronically submit their travel information, including a suitable quarantine plan, prior to entry.

From Feb. 22, officials will also require all international air travelers to stay at a government-authorized hotel for up to three nights, at their own expense, while they await the results of their arrival test. Travelers must reserve their three-night stay prior to departure to Canada. Hotel bookings are available online since Feb. 18. The hotels will be located near the only four airports accepting international flights: Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, and Montreal.

All airline passengers aged five years or older who are traveling to Canada must provide the airline with proof of having tested negative for COVID-19, using either a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test or a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departing for Canada. Travelers from South America and the Caribbean are allowed to present results from tests taken within 96 hours of departure for Canada. Travelers arriving by the land border must also present a negative COVID-19 test result, taken no more than 72 hours prior to arriving at the border. Canadian citizens or permanent residents who do not produce proof of a negative COVID-19 test will be allowed to enter but will face significant monetary penalties.


MDTI-WA-2021-0082
Date: 22 February 2021

USA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 22 FEBRUARY 2021

US authorities are maintaining risk assessment levels for travelers entering the country from international destinations. Under the current guidelines, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses a four-level system to categorize the risk of COVID-19 in countries and territories worldwide based on the number of cases in the past 28 days.

Regardless of the level of the destination, authorities recommend that individuals get a COVID-19 test between 1-3 days before traveling abroad and postpone travel if they are still waiting for the test result, tested positive, or are sick.

Additionally, officials advise individuals in the US to follow these recommendations, depending on the risk levels in the country they intend to travel to:
Level 4 – Very High: avoid all travel
Level 3 – High: avoid nonessential travel
Level 2 – Moderate: those at higher risk of severe illness should avoid nonessential travel
Level 1 – Low: no limitations to travel

Recommendations for travelers entering the US also change depending on the risk level of the country they departed. Authorities advise those traveling from destinations categorized as Level 4, Level 3, and Level 2 risk of COVID-19 to get tested within 3-5 days upon arrival in the US and stay at home for seven days, or to stay at home for 10 days upon arrival if they do not get tested.

As of Feb. 20, most countries and territories around the world are at Level 4, including most of Europe, most of Latin America, and Canada, as well as the US territories of Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. 12 countries and territories are at Level 3, the Bahamas, Philippines, and Trinidad and Tobago, while 15 countries and territories are at Level 2: including Antigua and Barbuda, Hong Kong, India, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand.

For travelers entering from countries and territories categorized as Level 1 – Low risk of COVID-19, officials recommend mask-wearing and maintaining social distancing upon arrival in the US. Authorities urge travelers who have recently participated in high-risk activities such as attending a mass gathering, being in a large crowd at a restaurant or bar, or traveling on a cruise in a country at Level 1 to get tested within 3-5 days upon return and remain at home for seven days, or self-quarantine for 10 days if they do not get tested. As of Feb. 20, there are 26 countries and territories at Level 1, including Australia, China, New Zealand, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Taiwan, and Vietnam.


MDTI-WA-2021-0081
Date: 22 February 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 22 FEBRUARY 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials permit partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomats to enter without prior government consent. Authorities also allow partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country.

The government allows entry for some critical workers on special visas, provided companies demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. Authorities require people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Inbound passengers must quarantine at government-designated facilities for 14 days. Almost all arrivals must undergo a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival and on days three and 12 of quarantine and receive a negative result before departing facilities. Vessel crews arriving in New Zealand must spend 14 days in quarantine unless they had been on the vessel for 28 days before docking at the port. Officials have instituted a quarantine fee structure for inbound travelers. Most travelers allowed into the country will have to pay NZD 3,100 (USD 2,265) for the first person, NZD 950 (USD 694) for each additional adult, and NZD 475 (USD 347) per additional child. Children under three years of age are exempt if staying with another person. New Zealand citizens, residence visa holders, and Australian citizens and permanent residents who typically reside in New Zealand are exempt from costs if they departed the country before Aug. 11 and intend to return home longer than 90 days. Temporary visa holders are also exempt from fees if they were residents in New Zealand as of March 19 and were outside the country before that date. Companies can cover the quarantine costs for inbound critical workers.


MDTI-WA-2021-0080
Date: 22 February 2021

AUSTRALIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 22 FEBRUARY 2021

An entry ban remains in effect for most foreign nationals. Permanent residents, long-term pass holders, and their immediate relatives can enter Australia, however. All inbound international passengers must undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine at designated facilities at the port of entry.

Inbound travelers must obtain a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result within 72 hours before departing for Australia. People who test positive for COVID-19 and their close contacts or travel companions are not allowed to travel to the country. Exceptions to the requirement are in place for seasonal workers from locations where testing is not widely available. Officials also require passengers aged 12 and older, as well as crew members, to wear facemasks on all international and domestic flights until further notice, with limited exceptions.

Several state governments are charging international and interstate arrivals for quarantine costs. Multiple states require incoming travelers to pay quarantine fees. Costs vary by state; most governments do not require up-front payment and have programs for those with financial constraints.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is maintaining its global travel advisory for citizens at “Do Not Travel,” the highest level, and the government has banned most citizens from outbound travel. Citizens living in other countries, government officials on business, and workers at offshore facilities are exempt from the restriction. Exceptions are also in place for airline and maritime staff and crews for international cargo shipments.


MDTI-WA-2021-0079
Date: 19 February 2021

BRAZIL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 FEBRUARY 2021

As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19, officials in Brazil are maintaining a ban on entry for nonresident travelers who in the last 14 days have been in South Africa or the UK as of Feb. 18. Citizens and legal residents of Brazil who have traveled through those two countries within the past 14 days will be permitted to repatriate; however, they must complete a two-week quarantine upon arrival.

Travelers entering Brazil by air from other destinations must present a negative result from a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction test (RT-PCR) taken no more than 72 hours before travel and must complete a pre-arrival health form. Foreign citizens are allowed to enter Brazil by air for visits of no longer than 90 days.

Nonresident foreign nationals remain prohibited from entering the country by land and water. Brazilian citizens, permanent residents, and their immediate family members, as well as foreign residents working for international organizations or foreign governments, or who are traveling for trade or humanitarian purposes, are exempt from the ban. Apart from the overarching land border closures and as part of a joint agreement, the land border crossings with Paraguay – specifically at Foz do Iguacu, Ponta Pora, and Mundo Novo – are open.


MDTI-WA-2021-0078
Date: 19 February 2021

IRELAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities in Ireland are maintaining measures introduced to combat the spread of COVID-19 as of Feb. 18. All incoming travelers are required to fill out a passenger locator form prior to arrival and possess proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the 72 hours prior to travel in order to be permitted entry. Additionally, all travelers are required to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival, though this can be ended early if the individual takes a COVID-19 test confirming a negative result no less than five days after arrival. Essential transport workers and individuals in transit are exempt from these requirements.

Individuals arriving from “Category 2” countries must observe the full 14-day self-isolation period. As of Feb. 18, Category 2 countries include Angola, Austria, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Malawi, Eswatini, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Rwanda, Seychelles, Tanzania, UAE, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Health officials are currently passing legislation to require arrivals from these countries to carry out their isolation in specifically designated hotels, though it is not confirmed when this measure will come into effect.


MDTI-WA-2021-0077
Date: 19 February 2021

GERMANY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 FEBRUARY 2021

Officials have extended a ban on travel from Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Portugal, Lesotho, and several southern African countries until at least March 3 due to the presence of new COVID-19 variants; the measure had been due to expire Feb. 17. German citizens and residents, as well as freight transporters and diplomats, are exempt.

Authorities are maintaining other international entry restrictions as of Feb. 18 as part of measures to combat the spread of COVID-19. Temporary border restrictions are in effect with the Czech Republic and Tyrol, Austria. International arrivals from these locations – now designated as “high-risk” areas – must provide evidence of a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken with the previous 48 hours on arrival. Numerous other locations, including the UK, Spain, Portugal, France, Ireland, Latvia, Slovakia, and Slovenia, as well as the Greek region of Western Greece, and the Finnish regions of Central Finland and Ostrobothnia, are also classed as high risk. All permitted arrivals who have visited designated variant or high-risk areas within the previous 10 days must provide a negative COVID-19 test no older than 48 hours upon arrival, or take a test as soon as they arrive in the country. These travelers must also self-isolate for 10-days; the self-isolation can be ended on day five with a second negative test.

Most travelers from outside of the EEA, with the exception of those from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and Thailand, remain prohibited from entry. Limited exceptions are made for EEA citizens and residents, diplomats, essential workers, students, freight and transport workers, individuals in transit, and for urgent reasons decided on a case-by-case basis. All such arrivals are subject to a mandatory self-isolation period; this measure does not apply to transport and freight workers.


MDTI-WA-2021-0076
Date: 18 February 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 18 FEBRUARY 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials allow partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomatic staff to enter the country without prior government consent. Authorities also permit entry for partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country.

The government allows entry for some critical workers. Companies must apply for a visa and demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. The government requires people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and will review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis. Inbound passengers must quarantine at government-designated facilities for 14 days. Almost all arrivals must undergo a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival and on days three and 12 of quarantine and receive a negative result before departing facilities.


MDTI-WA-2021-0075
Date: 18 February 2021

INDIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 18 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities are advising Indian citizens to delay all nonessential international travel. Officials allow persons of all nationalities to enter the country through open land, sea, or air routes on any visa type other than tourism. Indian consulates will issue new visas upon approval; authorities will also consider existing visas – except electronic, medical, and tourist categories – as valid. Foreign nationals already in the country can apply online to avail of a free visa extension valid for 30 days after regular international commercial flights resume.

As of Feb. 18, “air bubbles” for commercial flights are operational or planned between India and 24 countries such as Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, UAE, UK, and the US. However, officials are only allowing reduced flights between India and the UK, as well as limiting the arrival of flights from the UK to Bengaluru, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, and Mumbai airports through Feb. 28. Modifications to such bilateral arrangements are possible at short notice.

International passengers traveling for emergency reasons need prior approval to enter without negative results of a PCR test for COVID-19; they must undergo on-arrival testing. Passengers requiring on-arrival paid testing facilities – available at the Bengaluru (BLR), Cochin (COK), Delhi (DEL), Hyderabad (HYD), and Mumbai (BOM) airports – must pre-book tests via the Air Suvidha portal and wait eight hours for negative test results before boarding a connecting flight or exiting the airport. Different states may impose variable quarantine and testing requirements; those seeking exemptions and waivers must do so from authorities in all intended destinations and transit states before arrival.


MDTI-WA-2021-0074
Date: 18 February 2021

CHINA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 18 FEBRUARY 2021

Entry into China is banned for foreign nationals traveling from specific countries, including Canada, Belgium, France, Russia, the Philippines, India, Italy, Bangladesh, the UK, Ukraine, and Ethiopia. The restrictions do not apply to Chinese nationals, foreign diplomatic passport holders, and individuals with C visas. Foreign nationals from other countries with valid residence permits for work, visiting family, and personal matters currently can re-enter China. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters issued by provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain visas to enter for emergency humanitarian purposes. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders – generally flight and shipping crew members – are exempt from entry bans. Officials have also banned flights to and from the UK until further notice.

Authorities require most arriving passengers from abroad to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure for China. Officials require all authorized inbound passengers from specified countries to provide evidence of both nucleic acid COVID-19 and IgM antibody tests from designated facilities in the departure country within 48 hours of boarding flights and undergo additional COVID-19 tests in each country they transit. As of Feb. 18, the measure applies to travelers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Denmark, Egypt, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, the UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Authorities will likely further expand the testing requirements to other countries in the coming days and weeks, possibly at short notice. Most travelers, regardless of nationality or residency, are barred from using land border crossings. Exceptions are in place for cargo transport, though backlogs remain possible at border checkpoints.

All authorized passengers must apply for a health certificate via the local Chinese diplomatic mission before travel. Chinese citizens must update their information through WeChat to obtain a health code before boarding flights. The government continues to conduct health screenings, including body temperature scans and nucleic acid testing, at ports of entry nationwide. Most international travelers must quarantine for 14 days, and officials generally allow nonresident passengers to stay in government-designated hotels at their own cost. However, some governments require inbound travelers to self-quarantine and undergo medical observation for three or four weeks. All arrivals must receive a negative COVID-19 test result in quarantine before release from designated facilities.


MDTI-WA-2021-0073
Date: 18 February 2021

MALAYSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 18 FEBRUARY 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. The affected countries include Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the US. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.


MDTI-WA-2021-0072
Date: 17 February 2021

RUSSIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 17 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities in Russia have extended the nation’s existing suspension of all commercial flights with the UK until 2359 March 16 in order to prevent the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 active in that country. Most categories of travelers from the UK may not enter Russia, except for diplomats and persons holding special visas, such as Highly Qualified Specialist visas. Those travelers arriving from the UK who are permitted to enter must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Russia; aircrews are exempt from this restriction.

Aside from the UK flight suspension, international flights are operating between Russia and more than 30 countries, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, France, Germany, Italy, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Netherlands, Serbia, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, and the UAE. However, the availability of flights is still dependent on COVID-19 restrictions in destination countries. Additionally, flights with low demand could be canceled or merged with other scheduled services. Foreign air passengers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test performed no more than 72 hours prior to their departure for Russia; Russian citizens must produce a negative COVID-19 test within three days upon arrival or self-isolate for 14 days. Foreigners are not allowed entry for tourism purposes.


MDTI-WA-2021-0071
Date: 17 February 2021

TAIWAN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 17 FEBRUARY 2021

The government has banned entry for most nonresident foreigners and suspended transit flights due to COVID-19 concerns. Prior to departing for Taiwan, all incoming passengers must submit proof that they have suitable accommodations for quarantine. Travelers planning to quarantine at home must sign an affidavit confirming they meet the one-person-per-residence requirements. Inbound travel for tourism and social reasons remains banned.

The government allows essential short-term business travel for specific activities from countries and regions on the CECC’s low- and medium-risk location lists. Travelers from designated locations must have spent 14 days in their place of origin before departing for Taiwan; they must also submit documentation from a local entity detailing the reason for the trip, a full travel itinerary, a disease prevention plan, and the results of a COVID-19 test to apply for reduced quarantine. As of Feb. 17, the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) classifies Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Fiji, Laos, Macao, Mauritius, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, and the Marshall Islands as low risk, and Australia, Singapore, and Vietnam as medium risk. Business travelers who are arriving from low-risk areas and have obtained advance permission for a shortened quarantine must quarantine for five days at government-designated facilities, while those traveling from medium-risk destinations must isolate for seven days. Business travelers who have not obtained a shortened quarantine permit in advance of their travel must quarantine for 14 days, regardless of their point of origin. All travelers must undergo a COVID-19 test at their own expense before their release from quarantine.

Officials require most inbound passengers, including Taiwan citizens and residents, to present a negative RT-PCR COVID-19 test obtained within three business days before departure. Individuals with ARCs who cannot obtain a test are exempt from the rule. The CECC also grants exceptions for short-term travelers departing and returning to Taiwan within three days, children under six years old, and passengers with old test results due to flight cancellations or delays. Exceptions are possible in emergency situations, but passengers receiving them must pay for a COVID-19 test upon arrival. All travelers seeking exemptions to pre-departure testing must provide supporting documents or face penalties.

Authorities require all arrivals with a travel history to South Africa and eSwatini in the previous 14 days to quarantine at centralized facilities for two weeks. The CECC also mandates that passengers from these locations test negative for COVID-19 and follow self-health management procedures for seven days after release from quarantine. The same requirements remain in effect for inbound passengers with a 14-day travel history to the UK. Officials will likely require airline crew and pilots traveling from South Africa and eSwatini to self-quarantine for 14 days before leaving their homes, in line with crewmembers arriving from the UK. Airlines in Taiwan continue to suspend direct passenger and cargo flights between the UK and Taiwan through at least the end of February.


MDTI-WA-2021-0070
Date: 17 February 2021

AUSTRALIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 17 FEBRUARY 2021

An entry ban remains in effect for most foreign nationals. Permanent residents, long-term pass holders, and their immediate relatives can enter Australia, however. Individuals who have been in New Zealand continuously for at least 14 days are also allowed to enter Australia. All inbound international passengers must undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine at designated facilities at the port of entry. Officials had previously exempted individuals traveling directly from New Zealand from quarantine requirements; the exemption was repealed following confirmed COVID-19 activity in New Zealand.

Inbound travelers must obtain a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result within 72 hours before departing for Australia. People who test positive for COVID-19 and their close contacts or travel companions are not allowed to travel to the country. Exceptions to the requirement are in place for seasonal workers from locations where testing is not widely available. Officials also require passengers aged 12 and older, as well as crew members, to wear facemasks on all international and domestic flights until further notice, with limited exceptions.

Several state governments are charging international and interstate arrivals for quarantine costs. Multiple states require incoming travelers to pay quarantine fees. Costs vary by state; most governments do not require up-front payment and have programs for those with financial constraints.


MDTI-WA-2021-0069
Date: 17 February 2021

FINLAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 17 FEBRUARY 2021

Finland continues to maintain measures imposed to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as of Feb. 16. As part of a regular review of global disease activity, authorities have decided to ease restrictions on travelers from Iceland, while reimposing restrictions on travelers from Rwanda. Accordingly, only travelers from Vatican City, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Iceland may enter the country without restrictions. Travel remains prohibited from all other countries outside the EU and Schengen Area, as well as Andorra, San Marino, and Monaco, except for returning residents and persons arriving for critical work-related or essential family reasons, until at least Feb. 25.

All permitted individuals traveling from the UK, Ireland, or South Africa must enter mandatory self-isolation for 14 days on arrival due to variants of COVID-19 active in those countries. These travelers are also required to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result taken within the previous 72 hours upon arrival. Authorities also recommend all individuals arriving from other restricted countries self-isolate for 10 days. All self-isolation requirements can be shortened by taking two voluntary COVID-19 tests. Travelers should take the first test up to 72 hours before arrival, or at the airport upon arrival for Finnish citizens and residents, and the second test no earlier than 72 hours after entering the country. Such individuals should remain in self-isolation until the result is known. If the test result is negative, the self-isolation period ends; if the test result is positive, the person will be placed in quarantine until they have recovered. These restrictions do not apply to travelers from Vatican City, Australia, Iceland, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, or Thailand.


MDTI-WA-2021-0063
Date: 10 February 2021

SINGAPORE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 10 FEBRUARY 2021

Most short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who do not provide essential services, remain banned from entering Singapore. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling to Singapore. Incoming passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. Foreign nationals traveling from most locations must test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip. All passengers must undergo PCR tests upon arrival in Singapore. People applying to enter Singapore under the ATP and Reciprocal Green Lanes (RGL) schemes must have a minimum SGD 30,000 (USD 22,500) travel insurance for COVID-19 medical treatment costs should they test positive for COVID-19 upon arrival in Singapore.

Arrivals from most locations must undergo SHN for 14 days at designated facilities. Travelers who spent the previous two weeks in mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan can serve a seven-day SHN in their residence. Arrivals from Fiji, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, and Thailand can serve a two-week SHN at their residence if they fulfill some requirements, including having spent the previous 14 days in the aforementioned locations and serving SHN at the accommodation alone or with other travelers with the same travel history. Long-term pass holders and short-term travelers who have been in South Africa and the UK within the previous 14 days cannot enter Singapore. Singaporean citizens and PRs with recent travel history in the UK are subject to a two-week quarantine at dedicated SHN facilities and subsequently a one-week self-quarantine at their residence.


MDTI-WA-2021-0062
Date: 10 February 2021

CANADA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 10 FEBRUARY 2021

Starting Feb. 15, authorities in Canada will require travelers who are allowed to enter through the country’s land borders to show proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 as part of the government’s efforts to curb infections. The test must have been taken no more than 72 hours prior to arriving at the border. Canadian citizens or permanent residents who do not produce proof of a negative COVID-19 test will be allowed to enter but will face significant monetary penalties.

The nation’s land borders with the US remain closed for all nonessential travel through at least Feb. 21. The measure has been in place since March 2020 as part of an agreement between the US and Canada and does not affect trade or essential business travel.Other travel restrictions remain unchanged. A ban on entering Canada remains in force for most nonresident foreign nationals, with those allowed to enter still being required to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country can enter, as can immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay.

Other nonresident foreign nationals allowed to enter must be traveling for essential reasons and must travel either from the US or be exempt from the entry restrictions by virtue of being temporary workers, international students, diplomats, aircrew members, or French citizens who live in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. People working in commerce, those who cross the border regularly, government officials, and persons employed in critical manufacturing may be exempted from the 14-day self-quarantine requirement, provided they do not display any COVID-19 symptoms. All airline passengers aged five years or older who are traveling to Canada must provide the airline with proof of having tested negative for COVID-19, using either a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test or a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departing for Canada. Travelers from South America and the Caribbean are allowed to present results from tests taken within 96 hours of departure for Canada.


MDTI-WA-2021-0061
Date: 10 February 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 10 FEBRUARY 2021

United Kingdom: Health officials in the UK plan to introduce the requirement that all travelers arriving in the country must undergo two additional coronavirus disease (COVID-19) tests while in quarantine, effective Feb. 15. The measure is being introduced to limit the spread of variant strains of COVID-19. Travelers will be required to take the tests whether they have traveled from a high-risk destination and have been placed in a government-designated hotel or are self-isolating at their own accommodation. Arrivals will be required to take the tests on the second and eighth days of their mandatory 10-day quarantine. These measures will apply in addition to the existing requirement that all international arrivals present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Health officials previously announced plans to mandate a 10-day quarantine for all passengers returning from COVID-19 hotspots, starting Feb. 15. The quarantine must be completed in a government-designated hotel at the traveler’s own expense. This mandate will apply to permitted arrivals from more than 30 countries, including the UAE, Portugal, South Africa, and all South American countries.

As previously stated, all international arrivals are already required to present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crews, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria, as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt.

Spain: The Spanish government has extended its existing ban on travelers from UK, Brazil, and South Africa entering the country by air until March 2 due to concerns regarding variant strains of COVID-19 discovered in those countries. This measure had originally been slated to expire on Feb. 17. The entry prohibition does not apply to residents and nationals of Spain and Andorra. Passengers in transit to non-Schengen countries are also exempt, provided they are scheduled to be in Spain less than 24 hours and remain in the airport transit area. With regard to other international travel, most arrivals from outside the EEA are prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Uruguay. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, health care workers, and freight transport workers, as well as other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving by air must fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

Greece: Domestic flight restrictions have been extended until Feb. 15, while international flight restrictions have been extended until Feb. 22. The domestic flight restrictions prohibit nonessential travel. Only essential trips, such as those necessary for healthcare, family responsibilities, essential business, or to return to a permanent residence, are permitted. Under the international flight restrictions, all international arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for seven days. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a rapid antigen test upon entry; airport authorities are also performing random checks of arrivals from other locations. A second test, taken up to seven days after arrival, may be applicable. Any traveler testing positive for COVID-19 must self-isolate for at least 14 days. All international travelers must also complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form.

Entry remains prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exceptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the UAE, and the UK are also exempt from the travel ban. Flights connecting with Turkey remain suspended. Additionally, all land border crossings – with the exception of the Promachonas crossing with Bulgaria – remain closed to nonessential traffic.


MDTI-WA-2021-0057
Date: 05 February 2021

IRELAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities in Ireland have introduced a requirement for all incoming travelers to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival starting Feb. 4 in order to stem the spread of COVID-19. Authorities will also maintain the requirement for all travelers arriving in Ireland to produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to travel in order to be permitted entry. Passengers who do not possess such a test upon entry face a fine of up to 2,500 EUR (3000 USD) or imprisonment for up to six months; essential transport workers are exempt from the test requirement. Travelers from South Africa and Brazil need to self-isolate in government allocated facilities. All arrivals must fill out a passenger locator form indicating the address where they will be staying.


MDTI-WA-2021-0056
Date: 05 February 2021

GREECE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities are maintaining international entry restrictions as of Feb. 4 to minimize the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). All international arrivals must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for seven days. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a rapid antigen test upon entry; random checks of arrivals from other locations will also take place. A second test, taken up to seven days after arrival, may be applicable. Should a traveler receive a positive COVID-19 test result, they must self-isolate for at least 14 days. All international travelers must also complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form.

Entry is currently prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exemptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the UAE, and the UK are also exempt from the travel ban. Flights connecting with Turkey and the Catalonia Region of Spain are currently suspended. All land border crossings – with the exception of the Promachonas crossing with Bulgaria – are currently closed to nonessential traffic.


MDTI-WA-2021-0055
Date: 05 February 2021

UNITED KINGDOM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 05 FEBRUARY 2021

Health officials in the UK plan to mandate a 10-day quarantine for all passengers returning from COVID-19 hotspots starting Feb. 15. The quarantine must be completed in a government-designated hotel at the traveler’s own expense. This mandate will apply to permitted arrivals from more than 30 countries, including the UAE, Portugal, South Africa, and all South American countries. Authorities will announce additional details in the coming days.

As of Feb. 4, authorities are maintaining previously imposed COVID-19-related entry restrictions. All international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crew, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt.

In addition, international arrivals to the UK must currently self-isolate for up to 10 days upon entry. Except as otherwise specified, travelers can reduce the required self-isolation period by taking a COVID-19 test five days after arrival at their own expense. Such individuals may be released from self-isolation upon receipt of a negative result. Health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodation must stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. All arrivals must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0054
Date: 04 February 2021

QATAR – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 04 FEBRUARY 2021

Only nationals, permanent residents, and those with pre-approved entry permits can enter Qatar. Authorities have extended the mandatory quarantine requirements of one week for all arrivals into the country through Feb. 15. Individuals arriving from “high-risk” countries must quarantine at hotels, whereas individuals from “low-risk” countries can quarantine at home. The measures do not apply to those who use shared quarantine facilities; they must continue to quarantine for two weeks. Individuals who have not obtained a COVID-19 test 48 hours before arrival have to take the test upon arriving at Doha International Airport (DOH). Authorities will conduct a second COVID-19 test six days after arrival.

Additionally, following the discovery of a new strain of COVID-19, individuals arriving from Denmark, the Netherlands, South Africa, and the UK must enter a seven-night quarantine at a government-designated hotel. Individuals are required to provide proof of hotel reservation before boarding their flights to Qatar.


MDTI-WA-2021-0053
Date: 04 February 2021

TURKEY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 04 FEBRUARY 2021

Turkey is maintaining measures imposed to curb the rate of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections, as of Feb. 2.

All international travelers arriving by air, land, or sea must produce proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result taken no more than 72 hours prior to their flight or ferry’s scheduled departure. Any traveler unable to submit a negative test result at the point of departure will not be allowed to board their flight; persons arriving in Turkey without proof of having tested negative will be required to quarantine either at their reported address in Turkey or at a government-designated facility. This directive will remain in force through at least March 1.

Additionally, all flights to/from the UK, Denmark, Brazil, and South Africa remain indefinitely suspended in response to discoveries of variant strains of COVID-19 in these countries. All travelers who have visited the UK, Denmark, Brazil, or South Africa within the 10 days prior to their arrival in Turkey will be quarantined for 14 days in a government-selected facility. Travelers are required to undergo a second COVID-19 test – in addition to the test taken prior to departure – after 10 days and may leave quarantine following a negative result. Humanitarian, cargo, repatriation, and emergency medical flights are exempt from the suspension; other flights may be exempted at the discretion of the Ministry of Health.


MDTI-WA-2021-0052
Date: 04 February 2021

EUROPE- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 04 FEBRUARY 2021

Netherlands: The Netherlands has tightened international entry restrictions, as of Feb. 2, in order to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). International travelers arriving via air or sea must undergo a COVID-19 rapid antigen test no more than four hours prior to boarding their flight or ferry. Transit passengers are also subject to this requirement. Air crews must undergo a rapid antigen test upon disembarking. Ship crews may undergo a rapid antigen test up to 24 hours prior to departure. Rapid antigen tests are required in addition to negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test results, which are required for most travelers arriving by air, sea, or land; the test must be taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure. All arrivals, including Dutch nationals, must also fill out a negative test declaration form prior to travel. Additionally, all travelers must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. These measures do not apply to individuals arriving from China, the Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand; additional exceptions are possible for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats.

Spain: With regard to other international travel, most arrivals from outside the EEA are prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Uruguay. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, health care workers, goods and transport workers, other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving via air are required to fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a QR Code that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates the country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

Sweden: Authorities in Sweden will require all non-Swedish travelers above the age of 18 to present a negative COVID-19 test no older than 48 hours starting Feb. 6 in an attempt to stem the spread of the new variant strains of the disease. Cross-border commuters will reportedly face more eased regulations; however, the specifics of cross-border commuting measures remain unclear. Authorities are also yet to specify the exact type of test required and will likely do so in the coming days.

Officials have also banned all nonessential travel from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland through at least March 31. In line with EU recommendations, authorities permit travelers from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay to enter. Exceptions to the ban include students, healthcare workers, cross-border workers, diplomats, freight workers, passengers in transit, and persons traveling on urgent family business. The Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs continues to advise against all nonessential travel to countries outside the EEA and Switzerland.


MDTI-WA-2021-0051
Date: 04 February 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 04 FEBRUARY 2021

Japan: The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country due to a new COVID-19 variant. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; officials will permit other foreigners’ entry under special circumstances. Authorities will continue to prohibit business travel from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea until at least March 7. The government is no longer honoring visas issued since Oct. 1. Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days. Entrants that cannot receive testing before departure, as well as permitted arrivals from the UK and South Africa, must quarantine at a government-designated facility for three days and undergo COVID-19 testing before completing the remainder of the 14-day self-quarantine period. Returning residents must complete a pledge to abide by quarantine orders, maintain location data on their mobile phones, and refrain from using public transport during the first 14 days in the country.

Malaysia: Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact-tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. The affected countries include Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the US. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.

Hong Kong: The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have no recent travel history elsewhere. Travelers arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints. Officials have barred entry for individuals who have stayed in Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours within 21 days of departure.

Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, the UAE, and the US as very high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from these locations must provide evidence of a negative test COVID-19 result taken within 72 hours before departure.


MDTI-WA-2021-0050
Date: 02 February 2021

MACAU – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 FEBRUARY 2021

Macau continues to implement border restrictions to China to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Feb. 2. Officials continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau, though exceptions are in place for some foreigners related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers.

Residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan and Macau citizens can enter the territory if they have not been to any other locations in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China only need to submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days of their arrival. However, officials require travelers from medium- and high-risk areas of mainland China to quarantine for 14 days at designated hotels. Affected travelers must also participate in “self-health management,” which entails restricting travel to work or school, wearing a facemask in public, and twice-daily temperature checks, for an additional 14 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0049
Date: 02 February 2021

CHINA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 FEBRUARY 2021

Authorities are banning foreign nationals traveling from specific countries, including Canada, Belgium, France, Russia, the Philippines, India, Italy, Bangladesh, the UK, Ukraine, and Ethiopia. The restrictions do not apply to Chinese nationals, foreign diplomatic passport holders, and individuals with C visas. Foreign nationals from other countries with valid residence permits for work, visiting family, and personal matters currently can re-enter China. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters issued by provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain visas to enter for emergency humanitarian purposes. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders – generally flight and shipping crew members – are exempt from entry bans. Officials have also banned flights to and from the UK until further notice.

Authorities require most arriving passengers from abroad to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure for China. Officials require all authorized inbound passengers from specified countries to provide evidence of both nucleic acid COVID-19 and IgM antibody tests from designated facilities in the departure country within 48 hours of boarding flights and undergo additional COVID-19 tests in each country they transit. As of Dec. 4, the measure applies to travelers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Denmark, Egypt, eSwatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, the UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Authorities will likely further expand the testing requirements to other countries in the coming days and weeks, possibly at short notice. Most travelers, regardless of nationality or residency, are barred from using land border crossings. Exceptions are in place for cargo transport, though backlogs remain possible at border checkpoints.


MDTI-WA-2021-0048
Date: 02 February 2021

VIETNAM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 FEBRUARY 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Vietnam. Exceptions are in place for foreign experts, investors, managers, skilled workers, and resident diplomats, among others. All passengers must quarantine at centralized facilities for 14 days upon entry into Vietnam. Officials said authorities would make limited exceptions for special diplomatic cases; it is unclear whether exemptions are also in place for individuals entering Vietnam under bilateral travel arrangements.

Inbound commercial flights remain suspended until further notice. Chartered flights may operate on a case-by-case basis to transport Vietnamese citizens and foreign nationals who are allowed to enter the country. Authorities have banned flights from South Africa and the UK due to new COVID-19 variants from the two countries. Additionally, the government is limiting inbound repatriation flights through at least mid-February ahead of the Lunar New Year holidays. Officials require people who can still enter Vietnam to test negative for COVID-19 within five days before the travel date.


MDTI-WA-2021-0047
Date: 02 February 2021

SOUTH KOREA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 02 FEBRUARY 2021

Officials are suspending direct flights from the UK through at least Feb. 11. South Korea flights to the UK continue to operate, though disruptions are likely. Passengers from South Africa and the UK can still enter South Korea; however, officials have suspended visa issuance for these countries, except for diplomatic, official, and humanitarian purposes. Arrivals from South Africa and the UK must undergo a 14-day quarantine, usually in hotels or residences. Passengers traveling from or transiting South Africa or the UK must also present confirmation of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result, regardless of nationality.

Visa-free and visa-waiver programs remain suspended with countries that have banned entry for South Korean citizens. Long-term visa holders in South Korea must obtain permits before departing the country and present medical screenings with proof of a negative COVID-19 test result before re-entry. Authorities have suspended visa-free entry for foreign sailors, who must obtain visas and provide a negative PCR COVID-19 test result issued within 48 hours before departure to enter the country. The government is limiting visas and flight capacity for passengers from Bangladesh, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Uzbekistan. Officials also require a medical certificate confirming that inbound travelers received a negative PCR COVID-19 test result within 48 hours of departure. Diplomats and people on urgent business travel from these high-risk countries are exempt from the restriction.

Authorities require all inbound foreigners to present a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result taken within 72 hours of departure. Officials also require all foreign crew boarding vessels bound for South Korea to submit a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure. Mandatory screenings are ongoing for international arrivals at all ports of entry nationwide. Authorities in Seoul require all inbound passengers remaining in the city to undergo COVID-19 tests upon arrival. Officials will screen travelers with COVID-19 symptoms immediately and transport other passengers from Incheon International Airport (ICN) to Seoul’s designated testing facilities. A 14-day self-quarantine requirement remains in place for all international travelers, regardless of testing outcomes. Officials will quarantine foreigners who do not have a residence in South Korea at government facilities at the traveler’s expense.


MDTI-WA-2021-0046
Date: 01 February 2021

CANADA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 01 FEBRUARY 2021

As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), health officials in Canada announced additional restrictions and quarantine requirements for travelers entering the country, starting Jan. 31. The Air Canada, WestJet, Sunwing, and Air Transat airlines will cancel services to Mexico, Costa Rica, and Caribbean islands between Jan. 31-April 30. Starting in early February, all international passenger flights -including those from the US- will enter Canada through one of the following four airports: Pearson International Airport (YYZ) in Toronto, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Montreal Trudeau Airport (YUL), and Calgary International Airport (YYC).

Officials also announced that starting in February, travelers entering Canada will need to take a COVID-19 test in the airport upon arrival; they will proceed to quarantine at an approved hotel, while waiting for the test results, at the travelers’ expense. If the test result is negative, travelers will be allowed to finish the 14-day quarantine at their homes; if the test result is positive, travelers will continue the quarantine in government-designated facilities.

The nation’s land border closure with the US for all nonessential travel remains in place through at least Feb. 21. The measure, which has been in place since March 21, 2020, is part of an agreement between the US and Canada and does not affect trade or essential business travel. Authorities announced that in the coming weeks, those allowed to enter Canada through the land border will also be required to present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19.

Other restrictions remain unchanged. All airline passengers aged 5 years or over who are traveling to Canada must provide the airline with proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using either a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test or a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departing for Canada. Travelers from South America and the Caribbean are allowed to present results from tests taken within 96 hours of departure for Canada.

A ban on entering Canada remains in force for most nonresident foreign nationals, with those allowed to enter still being required to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country can enter, as well as immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents, provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay.


MDTI-WA-2021-0045
Date: 01 February 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 01 FEBRUARY 2021

Poland: As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), health officials in Poland are maintaining international entry restrictions and domestic measures as of Jan. 29. Citizens and residents of EEA member states, as well as those from Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Tunisia, are permitted to enter Poland without restriction. Individuals entering the country from elsewhere by any form of public air, sea, or vehicular transport, as well as anyone who has been in close contact with an individual infected with COVID-19 must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. Additionally, anyone cohabitating with a person who is in quarantine must also self-isolate. Individuals who can present a negative COVID-19 test no older than 48 hours upon arrival, as well travelers who have been vaccinated against COVID-19, will be exempt from self-isolation.

France: As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), health officials in France are tightening international entry restrictions and domestic measures as of Jan. 29. France will suspend travel from and to countries outside the EU from 001 Jan. 31. Limited exceptions will be granted for essential travel. In addition all travelers arriving from the EU will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure. Cross-border workers and freight transporters will be exempt from the testing measure.

Germany: In an effort to limit the spread of a new strain of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), health officials in Germany are suspending travel from Brazil, South Africa, the UK, Ireland, and Portugal from Jan. 30. Travel from Lesotho and eSwatini will be suspended starting Jan. 31. German citizens, residents, as well as freight transporters and diplomats, are exempt from this measure. These restrictions will be in place until at least Feb. 17. Additionally, Germany has designated numerous locations, including the UK, Spain, Portugal, France, Ireland, Latvia, and Slovenia as high-risk areas. All permitted travelers arriving in the country who have visited designated variant, or high-risk areas within the previous 10 days must provide a negative COVID-19 test no older than 48 hours upon arrival, or take a test as soon as they arrive in the country. These travelers must also self-isolate for 10-days; the self-isolation can be ended on day five with a second negative test.

Italy: Persons who have visited or transited the UK within 14 days prior to arriving in Italy will be barred from entering the country unless they have been legal residents since prior to Dec. 23, 2020, or are traveling for an essential reason; such essential reasons must be declared in writing. Travelers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19; the test must have been taken no more than 72 hours before departing for Italy. Travelers must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival. Regardless of the test results, travelers from the UK must report to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days.

Aside from the UK-specific measures, other international entry restrictions remain in force. Travel from outside the EEA, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea is currently prohibited except when conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons. All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Arrivals from the EEA and Switzerland must have proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within the previous 48 hours; all other permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.


MDTI-WA-2021-0044
Date: 01 February 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 01 FEBRUARY 2021

Russia: Authorities in Russia are maintaining international travel restrictions as of Jan. 29. Authorities previously extended the existing suspension of all commercial flights with the UK until 2359 Feb. 1 in order to prevent the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 active in the country. Most categories of travelers from the UK may not enter the country, except for diplomats and special visa holders, including Highly Qualified Specialist visas. However, persons arriving from the UK must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Russia; aircrews are exempt from this restriction.

Saudi Arabia: Due to the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, authorities in Saudi Arabia have postponed the end of a ban on international travel for its citizens and the reopening of its land, sea, and air borders from March 31 to May 17. In accordance with restrictions in force as of Jan. 29, only non-Saudis who hold valid exit and entry, work, or residency visas are currently permitted to enter Saudi Arabia; travelers with tourist visas are barred from entry. Authorities are requiring all non-Saudis, except for children aged eight and under, to present a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test to travel to Saudi Arabia. The COVID-19 test must have been administered within no more than 72 hours prior to departing for the kingdom; travelers who do not provide the requisite negative test result will be barred from boarding their flight. Travelers are required to complete a health disclaimer form and download and register on the Tatamman and Tawakkalna applications prior to arrival in Saudi Arabia. All arrivals are subject to a maximum of seven days’ home quarantine; however, the quarantine period may be reduced to three days upon the completion of an additional COVID-19 test.

Timor Leste: The border closure and suspension of entry for all local citizens and foreigners are in effect through at least Feb. 1. Exceptions are in place for diplomatic personnel, members of international organizations and bilateral cooperation agencies, petroleum sector workers, and medical emergencies. Permitted travelers arriving in Timor-Leste are required to quarantine for 14 days in government facilities or in their private residences, subject to prior approval from the Ministry of Health. Travelers must provide a negative COVID-19 test before they are allowed to leave the quarantine sites. The transportation of goods can continue operating.

Singapore: Most short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who do not provide essential services, remain banned from entering Singapore. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling to Singapore. Incoming passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. Foreign nationals traveling from most locations must test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip. All passengers must undergo polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests upon arrival in Singapore. Additionally, starting at 2359 Jan. 31, people who are applying to enter Singapore under the Air Travel Pass (ATP) and RGL schemes must have a minimum SGD 30,000 (USD 22,500) travel insurance for COVID-19 medical treatment costs should they test positive for COVID-19 upon arrival in Singapore.

Thailand: Limited inbound tourist flights are operating. Cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft can continue operating. Thai authorities are allowing travelers from 56 locations to enter the country without visas. Passengers must still obtain a Certificate of Entry from a Thai embassy if they are foreigners, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip, provide evidence of a quarantine facility booking, and isolate for two weeks at the designated facilities upon arrival. Officials have increased the length of visas from 30 to 45 days. The 56 locations are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. People from all other locations must still obtain a special tourist visa to enter Thailand; these travelers must also quarantine at designated facilities for two weeks upon arrival.

Myanmar: International commercial passenger flights remain suspended, though relief and cargo flights can continue operating. Additionally, authorities may also allow special flights to transport citizens to and from Myanmar on a case-by-case basis. Visa-on-arrival and e-visa services remain suspended. Exemptions to entry bans include resident diplomats and UN officials. People who can enter Myanmar must self-quarantine for seven days in their country of origin and test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trips. Upon arrival, the passengers must isolate for another seven days at a government facility and undergo another COVID-19 test. If the travelers obtain a negative test result, they will then quarantine for another seven days at their residence. Authorities may allow resident diplomats and UN officials to undergo quarantine at their residence. The government has suspended entry for travelers coming from the UK due to concerns over a new COVID-19 strain. Additionally, authorities also permit business trips for those working in important sectors, such as oil, gas, and power from mainland China and Japan in a so-called “fast-lane” arrangement, with protocols in place. Safeguards for the fast-lane agreements include requiring travelers to present a medical document attesting that they are COVID-19-negative within 36 hours before boarding flights, taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Myanmar, and isolating at designated facilities. The land border remains closed to passenger transit, though goods transport can continue.

Cambodia: The issuance of tourist visas and e-visas, visa-on-arrival services, and visa-free travel remain suspended. Foreign nationals intending to visit Cambodia must obtain a visa from a diplomatic mission, proof of medical insurance coverage of at least USD 50,000, and a medical certificate from local health authorities issued no more than 72 hours before travel stating the individual is free from COVID-19. Travelers must take COVID-19 tests upon arrival and quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated facility. Inbound foreign nationals must pay a USD 2,000 deposit to cover costs, including USD 100 for COVID-19 testing and USD 30 for a certificate stating that they are free from the virus; only limited exceptions are allowed. Cambodia’s suspension of flights from Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines remains in effect.


MDTI-WA-2021-0039
Date: 28 January 2021

INDIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 28 JANUARY 2021

Flights are operational between the UK and India since early January after a brief ban citing concerns over a new COVID-19 variant. However, entrants from the UK through at least 2359 Feb. 14 must produce negative results of an RT-PCR COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure and submit an online health form through the Air Suvidha portal before entry. They must also undergo additional self-paid on-arrival COVID-19 testing. Travelers from the UK who test negative for COVID-19 on arrival will typically quarantine for 14 days at their residence, while those with a positive result must undergo institutional quarantine. However, UK arrivals to Delhi must quarantine for seven days in a designated facility before undergoing home quarantine for a week. Officials are only allowing 30 out of the usual 67 flights between the two nations, as well as limiting the arrival of flights from the UK to Bengaluru, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, and Mumbai airports. Authorities are advising Indian citizens to delay all nonessential international travel. Officials allow persons of all nationalities to enter the country through air or seaports on any visa type other than tourism. Indian consulates will issue new visas upon approval; authorities will also consider existing visas – except electronic, medical, and tourist categories – as valid. Foreign nationals already in the country can apply online to avail of a free visa extension valid for 30 days after regular international commercial flights resume.


MDTI-WA-2021-0038
Date: 28 January 2021

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 28 JANUARY 2021

As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), authorities in Dubai Emirate will update international entry requirements effective Jan. 31. UAE residents, Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) citizens, and visitors traveling to Dubai are required to take a pre-travel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, regardless of the country from which they are arriving. The PCR test must be taken within 72 hours of arrival. Arrivals from some countries may be required to undergo an additional test on landing in Dubai.

Aside from the new regulations for Dubai, Emirati citizens and residents can enter Abu Dhabi Emirate within 48 hours of receiving a negative PCR or diffractive phase interferometry (DPI) test result. There is a mandatory PCR test on the fourth day of entry for those who stay for four days or more, and on the eighth day for those staying eight days or more.

International tourists can also enter Abu Dhabi Emirate. Those arriving from so-called “green listed” (lower risk) countries must present a negative PCR test result obtained no more than 96 hours prior to their departure for the UAE. Upon entering the emirate, travelers will undergo an additional PCR test. Arrivals whose second test result is negative do not have to quarantine for 10 days. After arrival, travelers from green-listed countries must take a third PCR test on day six for those staying for six days or more, and a fourth test on day 12 for those staying for 12 days or more. Country classifications are subject to review every two weeks.


MDTI-WA-2021-0037
Date: 28 January 2021

INDONESIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 28 JANUARY 2021

Indonesia continues to adjust restrictions to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Jan. 26. Authorities have extended the entry ban for most foreigners through Feb. 8 due to concerns over a new COVID-19 variant. Exemptions from the ongoing entry ban for foreigners are in place for high-level state visits and holders of Limited Stay Permit Cards, among others; the government’s level of enforcement is unclear. A nationwide public health emergency remains in effect until further notice.

Returning Indonesian citizens and foreigners who can still enter the country must present evidence that they have tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours before departure, register on the eHAC mobile application before the trips, quarantine for five days at designated facilities upon arrival, and obtain a negative result from another COVID-19 test before leaving the isolation premises. All international travelers are also encouraged to download the PeduliLindungi contact-tracing application.


MDTI-WA-2021-0036
Date: 28 January 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 28 JANUARY 2021

Ireland: Authorities are maintaining certain international entry restrictions. All travelers arriving in Ireland are required to produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to travel in order to be permitted entry. Passengers who do not possess such a test upon entry face a fine of up to 2,500 EUR (3000 USD) or imprisonment for up to six months and will need to self-isolate for 14 days upon entry.

Travelers from EU-designated areas of low COVID-19 activity (so-called “green” and “orange” regions) are not required to self-isolate upon entry. Travelers from areas of medium or high COVID-19 activity (grey and red regions, respectively) must self-isolate for 14 days. Travelers from South Africa and Brazil need to self-isolate in government allocated hotels. All international travelers arriving from Northern Ireland are subject to the same restrictions. Freight transport workers, maritime employees, and aircraft pilots are exempt from these measures. All arrivals must fill out a passenger locator form indicating the address where they will be staying.

Spain: Most arrivals from outside the EEA are prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Uruguay. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, health care workers, goods and transport workers, other essential workers, students, and those traveling for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving via air are required to fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a Quick Response Code (QR) that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates its country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

United Kingdom: All international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside of the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crew, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt.

In addition, international arrivals to the UK must currently self-isolate for up to 10 days upon entry; travelers can reduce the required self-isolation period by taking a COVID-19 test five days after arrival at their own expense. Such individuals may be released from self-isolation upon receipt of a negative result. Health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodation must stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. All arrivals must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days.

Luxembourg: Effective Jan. 29, authorities in Luxembourg plan to require all incoming international air travelers to present documentation proving that they have tested negative for coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The negative result must be from a nucleic acid or rapid antigen test taken no more than 72 hours prior the flight departure and be presented at boarding. Travelers from countries within the European Union or Schengen Area, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and Vatican City as well as residents of Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand are permitted to enter Luxembourg. Most travelers from other countries, including the UK, remain prohibited, although exceptions are in place for essential work, study, and family reasons. Individuals arriving from the UK in possession of a negative test result taken within the previous 48-72 hours must take a further test on arrival and self-isolate until the result has been confirmed.

Norway: Authorities in Norway plan to tighten the country’s international entry restrictions in an effort to limit the spread of the new variant of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was initially discovered in the southeast of England. Effective Jan. 29, all international travelers, with the exception of Norwegian citizens and legal residents, will be barred from entry. Nevertheless, certain exemptions will be in place for health workers arriving from Sweden and Finland, freight transporters, and aircraft crews, as well as for close family members of Norway residents. Journalists and other personnel on assignment for foreign media institutions, and foreigners who work within critical social functions will also still be allowed entry.

The new directive is in addition to all existing international entry restrictions. Travelers allowed entry must present a negative COVID-19 test taken no later than 24 hours prior to arrival. If arriving via plane, the test must have been taken no more than 24 hours prior to the plane’s scheduled departure time. Norwegian citizens and residents are exempt from this requirement. Travelers from high-risk areas must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. Travelers who do not have permanent residence in the country or a suitable place of residence upon arrival can stay in a hotel of their choice, provided they can document their self-isolation in accordance with official regulations; otherwise, they must stay in government-designated quarantine hotel. All arrivals in Norway must also register with authorities during the 72 hours prior to entry.

Portugal: Authorities permit entry for travelers from the EU and Schengen Area countries, Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay; these individuals do not require a COVID-19 test unless their final destination is the Azores or Madeira. Travel from other countries remains prohibited, except for limited essential reasons, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting for essential work or study. All such arrivals are required to submit a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours before boarding; however, Portuguese nationals and residents may arrange to take the test on arrival at their own expense.


MDTI-WA-2021-0035
Date: 26 January 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 26 JANUARY 2021

Hong Kong: The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Officials are also barring entry for individuals who have stayed in Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours on the day of departure or visited the countries within the previous 21 days. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have no recent travel history elsewhere. Travelers arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints.

Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, the UK, Ukraine, and the US as high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 result from a test taken within 72 hours before departure. Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to self-quarantine at a hotel for 21 days; travelers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All arriving travelers must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine provided they test negative for COVID-19.

Macau: Officials continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau. Exceptions are in place for some foreign nationals related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers. Arrivals from all areas, except Taiwan and mainland China, must quarantine for 21 days. Authorities allow residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau to enter the territory if they have not been to any other locations in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China must submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days of their arrival. Travelers from Hong Kong must submit a negative COVID-19 test issued within 24 hours of arrival and undergo 21 days of quarantine under medical observation. Visitors from Taiwan need to submit a negative COVID-19 test administered within seven days of arrival and quarantine for 14 days. Travelers must pay quarantine fees of USD 700; locals are exempt from the quarantine fee for their first entry but must pay for subsequent quarantine periods unless traveling for select purposes. Officials require people released from quarantine to participate in “self-health management,” including restricting travel to work or school, wearing a facemask in public, and twice-daily temperature checks. Travelers in quarantine for 14 days must follow the instructions additional 14 days, while individuals in quarantine for 21 days must carry out self-health management for the next seven days. Affected people must receive a negative COVID-19 test result the day before the management period ends.

Brunei: Most foreign nationals, including long-term pass holders, remain banned from entering or transiting Brunei. Existing travel, student, and dependent visas remain suspended, with limited exceptions. People who can enter Brunei must test for COVID-19 before departure and upon arrival. Arrivals must quarantine between 2-14 days at government-designated facilities, depending on the risk level of the country of departure. Travelers can leave the isolation sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. Authorities will consider appeals from foreigners in special situations, such as those on scholarship studies or undergoing medical treatment in Brunei, to enter the country. Foreigners permitted entry in such cases must obtain a Bruneian citizen or entity as a guarantor.


MDTI-WA-2021-0034
Date: 26 January 2021

BRAZIL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 26 JANUARY 2021

All flights originating in or transiting through the UK remain banned until further notice. Officials stated that the measure is due to the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 detected in the UK. In addition, travelers who have transited the UK in the previous 14 days will be denied entry into Brazil.

All travelers entering Brazil by air must present a negative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction test (RT-PCR) taken 72 hours before travel and must complete a pre-arrival health form.

Nonresident foreign nationals remain prohibited from entering the country by land and water, except as specified otherwise. Brazilian citizens, permanent residents, and their immediate family members, as well as foreign residents working for international organizations or foreign governments, or who are traveling for trade or humanitarian purposes, are exempt from the ban.


MDTI-WA-2021-0033
Date: 26 January 2021

USA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 26 JANUARY 2021

US authorities have issued orders to ban entry for most nonresident foreign nationals who have been in South Africa in the 14 days prior to their arrival effective Jan. 30 as part of the government’s efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). An order prohibiting entry for most nonresident foreign nationals who, in the previous 14 days, have been in any of the following countries also remains in place: Brazil, the UK, Ireland, any of the 26 European Schengen Area countries, Iran, and China (excluding Hong Kong and Macau).

US citizens, permanent residents, spouses of US citizens or permanent residents, parents, legal guardians or siblings of US citizens or permanent residents who are under 21 years old, as well as diplomats and airline employees, are exempt from the ban. Business travelers, students, investors, academics, and journalists, and others traveling from the Schengen Area, the UK, or Ireland may qualify for a national interest exception but must contact US diplomatic offices to apply.

Other nationwide travel guidelines remain unchanged. Effective Jan. 26, all persons aged two years or older traveling by air to the US – including US citizens and permanent residents – must present negative results from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antigen test taken no more than 72 hours before departure for the US; alternatively, they can present proof of having recovered from COVID-19 within the previous 90 days. Airlines must deny travel to those who do not present either of these documentations.

State and local authorities have taken measures stricter than those at the federal level. Several states have imposed additional travel restrictions, including for travelers entering from other US states or international destinations; the measures in many cases involve a 14-day self-quarantine or proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours of arrival into a new state. Most states have some limitations on business activities, and many of them have further tightened the restrictions since mid-November due to increases in COVID-19 activity.


MDTI-WA-2021-0032
Date: 25 January 2021

HONG KONG – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 25 JANUARY 2021

The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Officials are also barring entry for individuals who have stayed in Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, or the UK for more than two hours on the day of departure or visited the countries within the previous 21 days. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have no recent travel history elsewhere. Travelers arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints.

Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, the UK, Ukraine, and the US as high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 result from a test taken within 72 hours before departure. Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to self-quarantine at a hotel for 21 days; travelers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All arriving travelers must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine provided they test negative for COVID-19.


MDTI-WA-2021-0031
Date: 25 January 2021

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 25 JANUARY 2021

International tourists can enter the Abu Dhabi Emirate. Under the measures, international travelers from “green” countries must present a negative (PCR) test result received within 96 hours of their departure for the UAE. The list of “green” countries is on the UAE Government website. Upon entering the emirate, travelers will undergo a PCR test. With two negative results, international travelers will not have to quarantine for 10 days. After arrival, travelers from green countries will need to take a third PCR test on day six for those staying for six days or more, and a fourth test on day 12 for those staying for 12 days or more. Country classifications are subject to review every two weeks.

For visitors entering the emirate from all other countries, procedures include the following: depending on where a person is traveling from, a PCR test must be carried out between 48, 72, or 96 hours ahead of departure. Travelers will undergo a PCR test on arrival at the emirate. An additional PCR test will be required six days after arrival; another PCR test will be required 12 days after arrival for travelers staying for 12 days or more. Travelers will have to wear an electronic wristband throughout their 10-day quarantine. If a traveler receives a negative result 10 days after arrival in Abu Dhabi, authorities will remove the electronic wristband.

Upon arrival at all airports in the UAE, stringent entry restrictions are enforced and may include a PCR test on arrival, a health declaration form, obtaining health insurance with COVID-19 coverage, a mandatory quarantine period for at least 14 days, and follow-up testing before the completion of quarantine.

Dubai Emirate reduced the quarantine period for some coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients and individuals who came into contact with confirmed patients from 14 days to 10 days, Jan. 5. The shortened quarantine period applies to COVID-19 patients who are asymptomatic after testing positive and patients with mild cases who fully recover from their symptoms without the help of fever-reducing medications. Individuals who come into close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient but did not develop any symptoms also qualify for the shortened quarantine period. Patients with moderate, severe, or critical cases may only be discharged after testing negative for COVID-19 two consecutive times at least 24 hours apart; these individuals must have been fever-free for more than three days and are required to self-isolate for a period of seven days after discharge.

All travelers to the UAE must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result within 96 hours before their departure. Residents returning to Dubai still require approval before traveling. Those returning to other parts of the UAE no longer need approval.

If departing from Abu Dhabi to the EU or UK, travelers will need to have a negative PCR test result taken within 96 hours prior to their departure.

Arrivals in Abu Dhabi from countries that authorities consider high risk are likely to be required to quarantine for at least 14 days. These include but are not limited to Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Chile. Additional high-risk countries can be found on the UAE Government website.


MDTI-WA-2021-0030
Date: 25 January 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 25 JANUARY 2021

Portugal: Government indefinitely prohibits most flights with the UK from Jan. 23 in an effort to stem the spread of a variant strain of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) first discovered in that country and now spreading throughout Portugal. Humanitarian flights and repatriation flights will be permitted. Separately, authorities have ordered the immediate closure of all educational facilities, including daycare centers, for at least 15 days starting Jan. 22. Authorities in Portugal permit entry for travelers from the EU and Schengen Area countries, Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay; these arrivals do not require a COVID-19 test unless their final destination is the Azores or Madeira. Travel from other countries remains prohibited, except for limited essential reasons, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting to essential work or study. All such arrivals are required to submit a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours before boarding; however, Portuguese nationals and residents may arrange to take the test on arrival at their own expense.

United Kingdom As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), from Jan. 22 health officials in the UK have barred entry for arrivals who have visited the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) or Tanzania in the previous 10 days due to the rapid spread of the new strain of COVID-19 in the region. Officials previously banned entry for travelers from several southern African nations with strong travel links with South Africa, namely Angola, Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Nonresident foreign nationals will not be permitted entry into the UK if they arrive from, have been in, or have transited South Africa or one of the aforementioned countries within the past 10 days. All international arrivals must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding. Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. Arrivals from outside of the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crew, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the British Overseas Territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt. Senior executives, or individuals with senior managerial responsibility in a business organization, are exempt from quarantine requirements. The executives, whether visiting or returning, must be engaged in specific business activities that deliver a significant benefit to the UK economy, including those that create or preserve 50 or more jobs in the UK or purchase goods or services for at least GBP 100 million (USD 134 million) from a UK-based business with at least 50 employees. Additionally, aerospace engineers, data infrastructure maintenance personnel, elite athletes, journalists, IT workers, and seasonal agricultural workers do not need to self-isolate upon entering the country.

France: Authorities in France will require travelers arriving from the EU via air or sea to provide proof of a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure from Jan. 24. Cross-border workers, essential workers, and freight transporters will be exempt. Travelers arriving via road or rail will not be subject to this requirement. There is currently no requirement for travelers from the EU to also self-isolate. France already requires travelers from outside the EU to produce proof of a negative PCR COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure. However, travelers from outside the EU must also self-isolate for seven days on arrival, with a second test being required at the end of the isolation period. Travelers unable to take a test in the country of departure may do so on arrival but must submit to seven days isolation at a government-designated facility.

Under most circumstances, travelers from EU and Schengen Area states, as well as those from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and Thailand, can enter France. Most travelers from other locations remain barred from entry; however, exceptions are made for French nationals and residents, as well as for persons traveling for what authorities deem to be essential reasons, such as certain necessary workers, diplomats, students, and those visiting for urgent family business. All such arrivals must complete a form declaring themselves to be COVID-19-free and present a certificate declaring their reason for travel, in addition to complying with the new testing requirement.

Netherlands: Travel to the Netherlands is generally only permitted for European Economic Area (EEA) residents or Schengen-associated countries and residents of Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Officials prohibit most travel from other countries except for transit and limited essential purposes, including urgent health and family reasons.

Authorities require all permitted travelers arriving by air, sea, train, or coach traveling more than 30 km (18 miles) from the border to present a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result before traveling to the Netherlands; the test must be within 72 hours before departure. Arrivals from outside of the EEA or Schengen Area must also fill out a negative test declaration form prior to travel. Additionally, all arrivals must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. These measures do not apply to individuals arriving from China, the Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand; additional exceptions are possible for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats.

Belgium: Effective Jan. 27-March 1, authorities will ban all nonessential travel to and from Belgium; the measures will apply to all road, air, sea, and rail traffic. Exceptions to the new travel ban will include travel for compelling family reasons, humanitarian reasons, study purposes, travel related to the daily life of cross-border workers, professional reasons, and other emergency reasons such as animal care, emergency vehicle repairs, and moving. As before, all arrivals staying in Belgium for more than 48 hours are required to fill in a Passenger Locator Form within 48 hours before arrival. Ahead of Jan. 27, travel is permitted with EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, and Thailand, though in many cases travel is strongly discouraged. Nonessential travel from all other locations is already prohibited. Additionally, travel with designated red zone countries based on COVID-19 activity is either strongly discouraged or prohibited; however, in some instances, including Australia and New Zealand, nations have been designated red zones because they do not allow travelers from Belgium. As of Jan. 23, most countries and territories worldwide are currently designated red zones except for France, Greece, Iceland, Norway, Rwanda, South Korea, Spain, and Thailand. Effective Jan. 25, Belgian officials will also enforce additional quarantine protocols for arrivals from the UK, South Africa, and South America. Travelers from these regions will be required to complete a 10-day quarantine and carry out a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on the first and seventh day of the quarantine. Other entry requirements remain, though nonresidents will be required to also be tested for COVID-19 on arrival. All individuals arriving in Belgium having spent 48 hours or more in a red zone must self-isolate on arrival and may only leave self-isolation following a negative result for a COVID-19 test taken no less than seven days after arrival. The quarantine period for those who test positive for COVID-19 has been increased from seven to 10 days. Additionally, nonresidents having spent 48 hours in a red zone must present proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival before entering the country, and will be tested again on arrival, while residents may instead take a test on arrival; exceptions apply to cross-border commuters.

Spain: Most arrivals from outside the EEA are prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Uruguay. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, health care workers, goods and transport workers, other essential work, students, and for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving via air are required to fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a Quick Response Code (QR) that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates its country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

Sweden: Authorities have prohibited travel from the UK and Denmark through at least Jan. 31 due to a new COVID-19 variant active in these countries. Exceptions to this travel ban include Swedish nationals, transport workers, travel for urgent family reasons, and individuals who live or work in Sweden. Exempted travelers arriving from the UK must possess a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before arrival in Sweden.

Officials have also banned all nonessential travel from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland through at least March 31. In line with EU recommendations, authorities permit travelers from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay, to enter. Exceptions to the ban include students, healthcare workers, cross-border workers, diplomats, freight workers, passengers in transit, and persons traveling on urgent family business. The Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs continues to advise against all nonessential travel to countries outside the EEA and Switzerland.

Norway: Beginning Jan. 25, authorities in Norway will require most travelers to present a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test taken no later than 24 hours prior to arrival. If arriving via plane, the test must have been taken no more than 24 hours prior to the plane’s scheduled departure time; previously, travelers to Norway were required to present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of arrival. Norwegian citizens and residents, as well as persons who come from Finland and Sweden regularly for work, are exempt from this requirement. All international arrivals must take a COVID-19 test either directly upon arrival or up to 24 hours after entering the country. A second test must be taken no sooner than seven days after arrival. All arrivals into Norway must also register with authorities during the 72 hours prior to entry. All EU and Schengen Area countries remain designated as high risk (red level), with the exception of Greenland and parts of Finland, which are designated as moderate-risk (yellow level) locations.


MDTI-WA-2021-0029
Date: 22 January 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 22 JANUARY 2021

Switzerland: Authorities have updated international entry restrictions imposed to combat the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) from Jan. 21. Under most circumstances, only citizens and residents of EEA countries, as well as those of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay, may enter Switzerland. However, as of Jan. 21, passengers entering from Andorra, Brazil, Czech Republic, Ireland, Lithuania, Montenegro, Netherlands, Panama, San Marino, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, UK, US, as well as the state of Saxony in Germany and the Veneto region in Italy, must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. The quarantine requirement does not apply to essential individuals traveling for business or medical purposes, or to transit travelers who have spent fewer than 24 hours in a high-risk country or territory. Travelers will not be allowed to shorten their self-quarantine if they receive a negative COVID-19 test result during the 10-day period. Other permitted travelers may enter without restrictions. More stringent entry restrictions remain in effect for travelers from the UK and South Africa as of Jan. 21 as part of Switzerland’s response to a new strain of COVID-19 active in those countries. Travelers from both countries who are not Swiss citizens or permanent residents have been barred from entry into Switzerland indefinitely since Dec. 20. Permitted travelers arriving from the UK and South Africa must self-isolate upon arrival for 10 days.

Greece: International entry restrictions are in place. All passengers arriving in Greece must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for seven days. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a rapid antigen test upon entry; random checks of arrivals from other locations will also take place. A second test, taken up to seven days after arrival, may be applicable. Should a traveler receive a positive COVID-19 test result, they must self-isolate for at least 14 days. All international travelers must also complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form. Entry is currently prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exemptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the UAE, and Uruguay are also exempt from the travel ban.


MDTI-WA-2021-0028
Date: 22 January 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 22 JANUARY 2021

Philippines: Most foreign nationals remain banned from entering the country. Exemptions are in place for several groups of foreigners, including those with investor visas, visas issued by the state agencies Aurora Pacific Economic Zone and Freeport Authority and Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority, as well as foreign nationals with long-term visas, among others. Inbound foreign nationals must secure a quarantine facility and a COVID-19 testing provider before the trip and quarantine for 14 days upon their arrival. Other visas, applications, and visa-free privileges remain suspended.

Indonesia: Foreigners remain banned from entering Indonesia through at least Jan. 25, but will likely be extended, due to concerns over a new COVID-19 variant. Exemptions from the policy are in place for high-level state visits and holders of Limited Stay Permit Cards, among others; the government’s level of enforcement is unclear. Returning Indonesian citizens and foreigners who can still enter the country must present evidence that they have tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours before departure, register on the eHAC mobile application before the trips, quarantine for five days at designated facilities upon arrival, and obtain a negative result from another COVID-19 test before leaving the isolation premises. All international travelers are also encouraged to download the PeduliLindungi contact-tracing application.

Russia: Authorities in Russia are maintaining international travel restrictions as of Jan. 21. Authorities previously extended the existing suspension of all commercial flights with the UK until 2359 Feb. 1 in order to prevent the spread of a variant strain of COVID-19 that was initially discovered primarily in the southeast of England. Most categories of travelers from the UK may not enter the country, except for diplomats and special visa holders, including Highly Qualified Specialist visas. However, persons arriving from the UK must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Russia; aircrews are exempt from this restriction.

Aside from the UK flight suspension, international flights are operating between Russia and more than 30 countries, including Armenia, Belarus, Cuba, France, Greece, Germany, the Czech Republic, Italy, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Netherlands, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Turkey, and the US. However, the availability of flights is still dependent on COVID-19 restrictions in destination countries. Additionally, flights with low demand could be canceled or merged with other scheduled departures. Foreign air passengers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test performed no more than 72 hours prior to their departure for Russia; Russian citizens must produce a negative COVID-19 test within three days upon arrival or self-isolate for 14 days. Foreigners are not allowed entry for tourism purposes.

Malaysia: Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. The affected countries include Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the US. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.

Macau: Officials continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau. Exceptions are in place for some foreign nationals related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers. Arrivals from all areas, except Taiwan and mainland China, must quarantine for 21 days. Authorities allow residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau to enter the territory if they have not been to any other locations in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China must submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days of their arrival. Travelers from Hong Kong must submit a negative COVID-19 test issued within 24 hours of arrival and undergo 21 days of quarantine under medical observation. Visitors from Taiwan need to submit a negative COVID-19 test administered within seven days of arrival and quarantine for 14 days. Travelers must pay quarantine fees of USD 700; locals are exempt from the quarantine fee for their first entry but must pay for subsequent quarantine periods unless traveling for select purposes. Officials require people released from quarantine to participate in “self-health management,” including restricting travel to work or school, wearing a facemask in public, and twice-daily temperature checks. Travelers in quarantine for 14 days must follow the instructions additional 14 days, while individuals in quarantine for 21 days must carry out self-health management for the next seven days. Affected people must receive a negative COVID-19 test result the day before the management period ends.


MDTI-WA-2021-0027
Date: 21 January 2021

GERMANY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 21 JANUARY 2021

Germany continues to maintain international entry restrictions. Commercial travel from the UK and South Africa is currently banned; German residents can apply for an exception via their transport provider.

Additionally, Germany has designated numerous locations, including the UK, Spain, Portugal, France, Ireland, the Faroe Islands, the provinces of Rogaland and Trondelag in Norway, and Madeira, Portugal, as risk areas. All travelers arriving in the country who have visited designated risk areas within the previous 10 days must provide a negative COVID-19 test no older than 48 hours upon arrival, or take a test as soon as they arrive in the country. These travelers must also self-isolate for 10-days; the self-isolation can be ended on day five with a second negative test.

Most travelers from outside of the EEA, with the exception of those from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and Thailand, remain prohibited from entry. Limited exceptions are made for EEA citizens and residents, diplomats, essential workers, students, freight and transport workers, individuals in transit, and for urgent reasons decided on a case-by-case basis. All such arrivals are subject to a mandatory self-isolation period as detailed above; this measure does not apply to transport and freight workers.


MDTI-WA-2021-0026
Date: 21 January 2021

NETHERLANDS – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 21 JANUARY 2021

Prime Minister Mark Rutte announced plans Jan. 20 to further tighten coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-related restrictions. From Jan 23, flights from non-EU and Schengen-associated states where rapidly spreading variants of COVID-19 have been identified will be suspended. These locations currently include Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guinea, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, the UK, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The flight ban will be in effect until at least Feb. 19. In addition, all international travelers will need to take a rapid antigen test before departure for the Netherlands; as of Jan. 20, only arrivals from Ireland, the UK, and South Africa must take such a test.

Travel to the Netherlands is generally only permitted for residents of European Economic Area (EEA) or Schengen-associated countries, in addition to residents of Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Most travel is prohibited from other countries except for transit and limited essential purposes, including urgent health and family reasons.

Authorities require all permitted travelers arriving by air, sea, train, or coach traveling more than 30 km (18 miles) from the border to present a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result prior to travel to the Netherlands. The test must have been taken within 72 hours prior to departure. Arrivals from outside of the EEA or Schengen Area must also fill out a negative test declaration form prior to travel. Additionally, all arrivals must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. These measures do not apply to individuals arriving from China, the Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand; additional exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats.


MDTI-WA-2021-0025
Date: 21 January 2021

VIETNAM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 21 JANUARY 2021

Foreigners remain banned from entering Vietnam, except foreign experts, investors, managers, skilled workers, and resident diplomats, among others. While short-term trips to Vietnam for leisure purposes remain banned, officials have started to reissue electronic visas to foreign nationals from 80 locations, including Australia, mainland China, India, Japan, New Zealand, the Philippines, South Korea, the UK, and the US.

Inbound commercial flights remain suspended until further notice. Chartered flights may operate on a case-by-case basis to transport Vietnamese citizens and foreign nationals who are allowed to enter the country. However, authorities have banned flights from South Africa and the UK, due to new COVID-19 variants from the two countries. Additionally, the government is limiting inbound repatriation flights through mid-February ahead of the Lunar New Year holidays. Officials require people who can still enter Vietnam to test negative for COVID-19 within five days before the travel date.

Authorities have bilateral arrangements with some countries to allow reciprocal travel for business purposes. Business travelers from Japan and South Korea can enter Vietnam with protocols, such as testing negative for COVID-19 before the trips and adhering to a pre-agreed itinerary while in Vietnam.


MDTI-WA-2021-0024
Date: 20 January 2021

MALAYSIA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 20 JANUARY 2021

Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from several countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. The affected countries include Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the US. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.

Malaysia continues to allow limited cross-border travel with Singapore for business and official purposes. Under the Reciprocal Green Lane (RGL) scheme, people can travel short-term from Singapore to Malaysia with an exemption from standard quarantine requirements for arrivals. The travelers must present approval letters from immigration authorities and a company or government agency in Malaysia, obtain visas if required, and test for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and upon arrival. Such travelers must comply with a controlled itinerary for the first 14 days and adhere to contact tracing measures. Additionally, in the Periodic Commuting Arrangement (PCA) scheme for long-term work visa holders, only people traveling to Johor State can quarantine at their residence or accommodations for seven days upon arrival, while those going to other Malaysian states must isolate at government-designated facilities for a week. Travelers can leave the quarantine sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. The PCA program allows the travelers to undertake multiple-entry visits through land border crossings at Woodlands or Tuas for 90-day stays once their applications are approved. Travelers are eligible for a home leave of two to four weeks after every minimum stay of 90 days in the country where they work.


MDTI-WA-2021-0023
Date: 20 January 2021

HONG KONG- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 20 JANUARY 2021

The government continues to ban all nonresident foreign nationals from entering the territory. Officials are also barring entry for individuals who have stayed in South Africa or the UK for more than two hours on the day of departure or visited the countries within the previous 21 days. These restrictions will be extended to Ireland and Brazil from Jan. 23. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter Hong Kong, provided they have no recent travel history elsewhere. Travelers arriving from Macau and Guangdong Province seeking to avoid quarantine must make a reservation online and only enter via open border checkpoints.

Hong Kong designates Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, the UK, Ukraine, and the US as high-risk areas. Returning residents arriving from high-risk locations must provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 result from a test taken within 72 hours before departure. Officials require all arriving travelers, except those from mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan, to self-quarantine at a hotel for 21 days; travelers must present a hotel reservation for the entire period before boarding flights. All arriving travelers must undergo COVID-19 testing upon arrival in Hong Kong and at the end of the quarantine period, if applicable. Officials will isolate and treat symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers, students, and business travelers whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory from the mandatory quarantine provided they test negative for COVID-19.

Officials are maintaining quarantine measures for crews of aircraft and maritime vessels indefinitely. Under the requirements, ships without cargo cannot exchange crews. On other ships, workers are no longer allowed to enter the territory and must travel directly to the airport after disembarking if completing their service on board. Inbound ship crews and flight crew members must obtain a negative COVID-19 test result within 48 hours of departure for Hong Kong. Both airlines and shipping companies must arrange point-to-point transport for employees to limit interaction with the public.


MDTI-WA-2021-0022
Date: 20 January 2021

MEXICO- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 20 JANUARY 2021

As of Jan. 19, Mexican authorities have tightened restrictions in several states under the existing color-coded system to track coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity at the state level and implement localized restrictions accordingly.

Officials extended their country’s pandemic-related land border closure with the US for all nonessential travel until at least Feb. 21. The ban on recreational boat travel will also remain in effect. These measures have been in place since March 2020 under a mutual agreement between the two countries. Cargo transport between Mexico and the US is exempt. Officials in Mexico continue to advise residents to avoid all international travel.


MDTI-WA-2021-0021
Date: 19 January 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 JANUARY 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials allow partners and dependents of citizens with a visa based on the relationship or that usually reside in New Zealand and diplomatic staff to enter the country without prior government consent. Authorities also permit entry for partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas. Australian citizens and permanent residents in New Zealand, Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments, and travelers for humanitarian reasons can also enter the country. Individuals from the Cook Islands can enter New Zealand without quarantine from Jan. 21.

The government allows some critical workers to travel to New Zealand. Companies must apply for a visa and demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. The government requires people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and will review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Travelers from the US and the UK must obtain a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of departure. The measure will not apply to children under two years old, people with medical conditions preventing testing, travelers that transit either country for less than 96 hours, or passengers transiting through New Zealand that do not leave the airport.

Authorities continue to quarantine inbound passengers at government-designated facilities for 14 days. Almost all arrivals must undergo a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival and on day three and 12 of quarantine and receive a negative result before departing facilities. Vessel crews arriving in New Zealand must spend 14 days in quarantine unless they had been on the vessel for 28 days before docking at the port. Officials have instituted a quarantine fee structure for inbound travelers. Most travelers allowed into the country will have to pay NZD 3,100 (USD 2,211) for the first person, NZD 950 (USD 677) for each additional adult, and NZD 475 (USD 338) per additional child. Children under three years of age are exempt if staying with another person. New Zealand citizens, residence visa holders, and Australian citizens and permanent residents who typically reside in New Zealand are exempt from costs if they departed the country before Aug. 11 and intend to return home longer than 90 days. Temporary visa holders are also exempt from fees if they were residents in New Zealand as of March 19 and were outside the country before that date.


MDTI-WA-2021-0020
Date: 19 January 2021

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 JANUARY 2021

International tourists are permitted entry into Abu Dhabi Emirate. Under the measures, international travelers from “green” countries must present a negative (PCR) test result received within 96 hours of their departure for the UAE. The list of “green” countries can be found on the UAE Government website. Upon entering the emirate, travelers will undergo a PCR test. With two negative results, international travelers will not have to quarantine for 10 days. After arrival, travelers from green countries will need to take a third PCR test on day six for those staying for six days or more, and a fourth test on day 12 for those staying for 12 days or more. Country classifications will be subject to review every two weeks.

For visitors entering the emirate from all other countries, procedures include the following: depending on where a person is traveling from, a PCR test must be carried out between 48, 72, or 96 hours ahead of departure. Travelers will undergo a PCR test on arrival to the emirate. An additional PCR test will be required six days after arrival. Another PCR test will be required 12 days after arrival for travelers who are staying for 12 days or more. Travelers will have to wear an electronic wristband throughout their 10-day quarantine. If a traveler receives a negative result, 10 days after arrival in Abu Dhabi, the electronic wristband will be removed by authorities.

Dubai Emirate reduced the quarantine period for some coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients and individuals who came into contact with confirmed patients from 14 days to 10 days, Jan. 5. The shortened quarantine period applies to COVID-19 patients who are asymptomatic after testing positive and patients with mild cases who fully recover from their symptoms without the help of fever-reducing medications. Individuals who come into close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient but did not develop any symptoms also qualify for the shortened quarantine period. Patients with moderate, severe, or critical cases may only be discharged after testing negative for COVID-19 two consecutive times at least 24 hours apart; these individuals must have been fever-free for more than three days and are required to self-isolate for a period of seven days after discharge.

All travelers to the UAE must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result within 96 hours before their departure. Residents returning to Dubai still require approval before traveling. Those returning to other parts of the UAE no longer need approval.

If departing from Abu Dhabi to the EU or UK, travelers will need to have a negative PCR test result taken within 96 hours prior to their departure.

Arrivals in Abu Dhabi from countries that authorities consider high risk are likely to be required to quarantine for at least 14 days. These include but are not limited to Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Chile. Additional high-risk countries can be found on the UAE Government website.


MDTI-WA-2021-0019
Date: 19 January 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 JANUARY 2021

Poland: Citizens and residents of EEA member states, as well as those of Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Tunisia, are permitted to enter without restriction. Persons entering Poland from elsewhere by public transport, which includes by air, as well as individuals who have been close to people infected with COVID-19 or who live with a person who is self-isolating, must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Entry restrictions for most foreign nationals remain in place, except for the following:
– Spouses, children, or dependents of Polish or EEA citizens.
– Foreigners who hold a Polish identity card (Karta Polaka).
– Foreigners who are permanent or temporary residents of Poland.
– Students enrolled in Polish educational institutions.
– Scientists who are conducting research or developmental work in Poland.
– Foreigners with valid work visas.

United Kingdom: As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), health officials in the UK will tighten international entry restrictions from 0400 Jan. 18 due to increasing rates of the newly discovered variant strain. Travel corridors will be suspended and all arrivals will have to self-isolate for up to 10 days upon entry; travelers can reduce the required self-isolation period by taking a COVID-19 test five days after arrival at their own expense. Such individuals may be released from self-isolation upon receipt of a negative result. Health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodations are required to stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. All international travelers entering the UK must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days. This measure will be in addition to the previously implemented orders requiring all international travelers to England, Scotland, and Wales to present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 before boarding starting 0400 Jan. 18.

Any persons arriving without such proof may be fined or denied entry. All international arrivals from outside of the UK, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands must be tested no more than 72 hours before departing their country of origin. Exemptions are in place for children under the age of 11, international rail and maritime crew, and certain other categories of travelers. Persons arriving from the overseas territories of Saint Helena, Ascension Island, and the Falkland Islands are exempt; the requirement will not enter into force until 0400 Jan. 21 for those traveling from Antigua and Barbuda, St Lucia, and Barbados. The government has issued online guidance on test criteria as well as details of certain traveler categories that are exempt. Northern Ireland will likely announce similar restrictions in due course.

Greece: International entry restrictions are in place at least until Jan. 21. All passengers arriving in Greece must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for seven days. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a rapid antigen test upon entry and comply with the self-isolation requirement, even if the test is negative; random checks of arrivals from other locations will also take place. A second test, taken up to seven days after arrival, may be applicable. Should a traveler receive a positive COVID-19 test result, they must self-isolate for at least 14 days. All international travelers must also complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form.

Entry is currently prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exemptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the UK, the UAE, and Uruguay are also exempt from the travel ban.

Netherlands: Authorities in the Netherlands have tightened entry requirements for travelers arriving from Ireland, the UK, and South Africa effective Jan. 15 due to new variants of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) active in those countries. Permitted travelers arriving from these countries via air must take a rapid COVID-19 antigen test returning a negative result at the point of departure directly prior to travel. The same measure will apply to arrivals by ferry from Jan. 19 and was previously implemented for individuals traveling from the UK via Eurostar or Eurotunnel services. This requirement also applies to individuals working in the transport sector.

Travel to the Netherlands is generally only permitted for residents of EU, European Economic Area (EEA), and Schengen Area countries, in addition to residents of Dutch Caribbean Territories, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Most travel is prohibited from other countries except for transit and limited essential purposes, including urgent health and family reasons.

Authorities require all permitted travelers arriving by air, sea, train, or coach traveling more than 30 km (18 miles) from the border to present a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result prior to travel to the Netherlands. The test must have been taken within 72 hours prior to departure. Arrivals from outside of the EU or Schengen Area must also fill out a negative test declaration form prior to travel.

Italy: Travelers from the UK are barred from entry unless they are legal residents of Italy or are traveling for an essential reason; such essental reasons must be declared in writing. Travelers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19; the test must have been taken no more than 72 hours before departing for Italy. Travelers must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival. Regardless of the test results, travelers from the UK must report to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days.

Aside from the UK-specific measures, other international entry restrictions remain in force. Travel from outside the EEA, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea is currently prohibited except when conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent health or family reasons. All permitted arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival. Arrivals from the EEA and Switzerland must have proof of a negative COVID-19 test carried out in the previous 48 hours; all other permitted arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are exempt.

Norway: All international arrivals must take a COVID-19 test either directly upon arrival or up to 24 hours after entering the country. A second test must be taken no sooner than seven days after arrival. All arrivals into Norway must also register with authorities during the 72 hours prior to entry. All EU and Schengen Area countries remain designated as high risk (red level), with the exception of Greenland and parts of Finland, which are designated as moderate-risk (yellow level) locations. Those arriving from red locations must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test taken no more than 72 hours before entry; persons without such tests may be refused entry. Norwegian citizens and residents, as well as persons who come from Finland and Sweden regularly for work, are exempt from this requirement, though some exemptions do not apply to travelers arriving from the UK.

Travelers from high-risk areas must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. Travelers who do not have permanent residence in the country or a suitable place of residence upon arrival can stay in a hotel of their choice, providing they can document their self-isolation in accordance with official regulations; otherwise, they must stay in government-designated quarantine hotels. Travelers from most non-EU and Schengen Area countries are currently prohibited from entering Norway. Individuals with close family in Norway or who have been granted permits to work or study in the country are exempt from the travel ban but must meet the same entry requirements as those traveling from a high-risk location. Authorities continue to advise against nonessential travel abroad.

Finland: Entry restrictions not directly related to the new variants of COVID-19 are to remain in place until at least Feb. 9. There are no restrictions on travel from Vatican City, Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, and Thailand. Travelers arriving from all EU and Schengen Area states, plus Andorra, Monaco, and San Marino are only permitted to enter Finland if they are returning residents, traveling for essential purposes, or arriving for work-related or family reasons. Travel is prohibited from all other countries except for returning residents and persons arriving for critical work-related or essential family reasons.

Authorities recommend all individuals arriving from restricted countries self-isolate for 10 days, though this can be shortened by taking two voluntary COVID-19 tests. Travelers should take the first test up to 72 hours before arrival, or at the airport upon arrival for Finnish citizens and residents, and the second test no earlier than 72 hours after entry into the country. Such individuals should remain in self-isolation until the result is known. If the test result is negative, the self-isolation period ends; if the test result is positive, the person will be placed in quarantine until they have recovered.


MDTI-WA-2021-0018
Date: 19 January 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 19 JANUARY 2021

South Korea: Officials are suspending direct flights from the UK through at least Jan. 21. South Korea flights to the UK continue to operate, though disruptions are likely. Passengers from South Africa and the UK can still enter South Korea; however, officials have suspended visa issuance for these countries, except for diplomatic, official, and humanitarian purposes. Authorities have extended bans on the issuance of exceptions to quarantine for travelers from higher risk areas, such as the UK and US, through at least late January; the government had previously banned quarantine exceptions through Jan. 17, authorities may extend the suspensions for other countries in the coming days. Arrivals from South Africa and the UK must undergo a 14-day quarantine, usually in hotels or residences. Passengers traveling from or transiting South Africa or the UK, regardless of nationality, must also present confirmation of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result.

Visa-free and visa-waiver programs remain suspended with countries that have banned entry for South Korean citizens. Long-term visa holders in South Korea must obtain permits before departing the country and present medical screenings with proof of a negative COVID-19 test result before re-entry. Authorities have suspended visa-free entry for foreign sailors, who must obtain visas and provide a negative PCR COVID-19 test result issued within 48 hours before departure to enter the country. The government is limiting visas and flight capacity for passengers from Bangladesh, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Uzbekistan. Officials also require a medical certificate confirming that inbound travelers received a negative PCR COVID-19 test result within 48 hours of departure. Diplomats and people on urgent business travel from these high-risk countries are exempt from the restriction.

Authorities require all inbound foreigners to present a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result taken within 72 hours of departure. Officials also require all foreign crew boarding vessels bound for South Korea to submit a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure. Mandatory screenings are ongoing for international arrivals at all ports of entry nationwide. Authorities in Seoul require all inbound passengers remaining in the city to undergo COVID-19 tests upon arrival. Officials will screen travelers with COVID-19 symptoms immediately and transport other passengers from Incheon International Airport (ICN) to Seoul’s designated testing facilities. A 14-day self-quarantine requirement remains in place for all international travelers, regardless of testing outcomes. Officials will quarantine foreigners who do not have a residence in South Korea at government facilities at the travelers expense.

Singapore: Most short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who do not provide essential services, remain banned from entering Singapore. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling to Singapore. Incoming passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. Foreign nationals traveling from most locations must test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip.

Arrivals from most locations must serve their SHN for 14 days at designated sites. Travelers who spent the previous two weeks in mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan can serve a seven-day SHN in their residence. Arrivals from Fiji, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, and Thailand can serve SHN at their residence for two weeks if they fulfill specific requirements. The travelers must have spent the previous 14 days in the aforementioned locations and must serve their SHN at the accommodation alone or with other travelers with the same travel history.

Long-term pass holders and short-term travelers who have been in South Africa and the UK within the previous 14 days cannot enter Singapore. Singaporean citizens and PRs with recent travel history in the UK are subject to a two-week quarantine at dedicated SHN facilities and subsequently a one-week self-quarantine at their place of residence. Additionally, short-term travelers who have been in Australia’s New South Wales (NSW) within the previous two weeks cannot enter Singapore. Singaporean citizens, PRs, and long-term pass holders with recent travel history in NSW must isolate at their own residence for a week.

Macau: Officials continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau. Exceptions are in place for some foreign nationals related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers. Arrivals from all areas, except Taiwan and mainland China, must quarantine for 21 days. Authorities allow residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau to enter the territory if they have not been to any other locations in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China must submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days upon their arrival. Travelers from Hong Kong must submit a negative COVID-19 test issued within 24 hours of arrival and undergo 21 days of quarantine under medical observation. Visitors from Taiwan need to submit a negative COVID-19 test administered within seven days of arrival and quarantine for 14 days. Travelers must pay quarantine fees of USD 700; locals are exempt from the quarantine fee for their first entry but must pay for subsequent quarantine periods unless traveling for select purposes.


MDTI-WA-2021-0017
Date: 14 January 2021

PORTUGAL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 14 JANUARY 2021

Authorities in Portugal have announced a nationwide lockdown and state of emergency 0001 Jan. 15 – 2359 Jan. 30 due to rising coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity.

Authorities in Portugal permit entry for travelers from the EU and Schengen Area countries, Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay; these arrivals do not require a COVID-19 test unless their final destination is the Azores or Madeira. Travel from other countries remains prohibited, except for limited essential reasons, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting to essential work or study. All such arrivals are required to submit a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours before boarding; however, Portuguese nationals and residents may arrange to take the test on arrival at their own expense.


MDTI-WA-2021-0016
Date: 14 January 2021

BELGIUM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 14 JANUARY 2021

Travel is permitted with EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, and Thailand, though in many cases travel is strongly discouraged. Nonessential travel from all other locations is prohibited. All arrivals staying in Belgium for more than 48 hours are required to fill in a Passenger Locator Form within 48 hours before arrival.

In addition, the government has designated certain locations with high COVID-19 activity as “red zones.” As of Jan. 13, all countries are designated red zones except for Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, and South Korea, Thailand, and limited areas within Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, and Spain. Travel with red zone countries is either strongly discouraged or prohibited. All individuals arriving in Belgium having spent 48 hours or more in a red zone must self-isolate on arrival and may only leave self-isolation following a negative result for a COVID-19 test taken no less than seven days after arrival. Additionally, non-residents having spent 48 hours in a red zone must present proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival before entering the country, while residents may instead take a test on arrival; exceptions apply to crossborder commuters.


MDTI-WA-2021-0015
Date: 14 January 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 14 JANUARY 2021

Brunei: Most foreign nationals, including long-term pass holders, remain banned from entering or transiting Brunei. Existing travel, student, and dependent visas remain suspended, with limited exceptions. People who can enter Brunei must test for COVID-19 before departure and upon arrival. Arrivals must quarantine between 2-14 days at government-designated facilities, depending on the risk level of the country of departure. Travelers can leave the isolation sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. Authorities will consider appeals from foreigners in special situations, such as those on scholarship studies or undergoing medical treatment in Brunei, to enter the country. Foreigners permitted entry in such cases must obtain a Bruneian citizen or entity as a guarantor.

Brunei allows travel for business and official purposes with Singapore in a so-called Reciprocal Green Lane scheme. For travelers from Singapore, a Bruneian host company or government agency must apply for the employee’s travel pass and controlled itinerary for the first 14 days in Brunei. The travelers must have remained in Singapore for 14 days before travel, obtain a visa if applicable, purchase a return flight ticket, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before departure, and download the BruHealth contact tracing application. Upon arrival, the employees must test for COVID-19, remain in their pre-approved accommodation place until the test returns negative, and adhere to a controlled itinerary.

Local nationals, permanent residents, and foreigners holding Bruneian identification cards remain barred from leaving the country. Only people departing to seek medical treatment or resume studies overseas can leave Brunei after obtaining approval from the Prime Minister’s Office. Outbound local citizens and permanent residents who require COVID-19 tests have to pay BND 100 (USD 76), while outbound foreign nationals will have to pay BND 200 (USD 151); authorities have exempted students, government employees on official duty, and people with permission from the Ministry of Health.

Japan: The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country due to a new COVID-19 variant. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country; officials will permit entry for other foreigners under special circumstances. Authorities will also prohibit business travel from 11 locations, including Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Taiwan, mainland China, Singapore, Brunei, and South Korea, from Jan. 14. The government is no longer honoring visas issued since Oct. 1. Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days, while passengers without test documentation must quarantine at designated locations.

Taiwan: Government requires all arrivals with a travel history to South Africa and eSwatini in the previous 14 days to quarantine at centralized facilities for two weeks, as of Jan. 14, after confirming the presence of a new strain of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) also mandates passengers from these locations to test negative for COVID-19 and follow self-health management procedures for seven days after release from quarantine. The same requirements remain in effect for inbound passengers with a 14-day travel history to the UK. Officials will likely require airline crew and pilots traveling from South Africa and eSwatini to self-quarantine for 14 days before leaving their homes, in line with crewmembers arriving from the UK. Airlines in Taiwan continue to suspend direct passenger and cargo flights between the UK and Taiwan through at least the end of February. The government has banned entry for most nonresident foreigners and suspended transit flights due to COVID-19 concerns. Authorities will tighten quarantine measures for all arrivals; from Jan. 15, entrants must submit proof of a quarantine location before departure. Travelers attempting to quarantine at home must sign an affidavit confirming they meet the one person per residence requirements.

Officials require most inbound passengers, including Taiwan citizens and residents, to present a negative RT-PCR COVID-19 test obtained within three business days before departure. Individuals with ARCs who cannot obtain a test are exempt from the rule. The CECC also grants exceptions for short-term travelers departing and returning to Taiwan within three days, children under six years old, and passengers with old test results due to flight cancellations or delays. Exceptions are possible in emergency situations, but passengers receiving them must pay for a COVID-19 test upon arrival. All travelers seeking exemptions to pre-departure testing must provide supporting documents or face penalties. Most arrivals, except those from low- and medium-risk countries, must self-quarantine for 14 days. Authorities require some inbound travelers from Southeast Asian countries to undergo a 14-day quarantine at government-designated hotels; officials will direct arriving passengers living with people with chronic illnesses, children below six years old, or adults above 65 years old to the facilities. All travelers must pay for a COVID-19 test before their release from quarantine.

Macau: Officials continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau. Exceptions are in place for some foreign nationals related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers. Arrivals from all areas, except Taiwan and mainland China, must quarantine for 21 days. Authorities allow residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau to enter the territory if they have not been to any other locations in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China must submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days upon their arrival. Travelers from Hong Kong must submit a negative COVID-19 test issued within 24 hours of arrival and undergo 21 days of quarantine under medical observation. Visitors from Taiwan need to submit a negative COVID-19 test administered within seven days of arrival and quarantine for 14 days. Travelers must pay quarantine fees of USD 700; locals are exempt from the quarantine fee for their first entry but must pay for subsequent quarantine periods unless traveling for select purposes.


MDTI-WA-2021-0014
Date: 13 January 2021

USA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 JANUARY 2021

US authorities have announced that effective Jan. 26, all persons traveling by air to the US must present a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antigen test taken no more than 72 hours before departure from their destination. The new order expands a previously implemented restriction applying to travelers from the UK to all international air passengers.

The measure is in addition to the existing pandemic-related entry ban for most nonresident foreign nationals who have been in the UK and Ireland, as well as Brazil, China (excluding Hong Kong and Macau), Iran, Ireland, and the European Schengen Area within the previous 14 days. US citizens and legal residents who have traveled to a country on the restricted list within 14 days before their return can enter the country; authorities urge such individuals to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for the affected country. Officials have added exceptions for nonresident foreign nationals arriving from the Schengen Area, the UK, or Ireland. Business travelers, students, investors, academics, and journalists, among others, may qualify for a national interest exception but must contact US diplomatic offices to apply.

US authorities are maintaining risk assessment levels for travelers entering the country from international destinations. Under the current guidelines, the CDC uses a four-level system to categorize the risk of COVID-19 in countries and territories worldwide based on the number of cases in the past 28 days.

Regardless of the level of the destination, authorities recommend the following steps for individuals in the US who plan to travel abroad:
– Get a COVID-19 test between 1-3 days before traveling abroad, and do not travel if they are still waiting for the test result, tested positive, or are sick.
– Get a COVID-19 test between 1-3 days before returning to the US.

Additionally, officials advise individuals in the US to follow these recommendations, depending on the risk levels in the country they intend to travel to:
Level 4 – Very High: avoid all travel
Level 3 – High: avoid nonessential travel; those at higher risk of severe illness, avoid all travel
Level 2 – Moderate: those at higher risk of severe illness should avoid nonessential travel
Level 1 – Low: no limitations to travel

Recommendations for travelers entering the US also change depending on the risk level of the country they departed. Authorities advise those traveling from destinations categorized as Level 4, Level 3, and Level 2 risk of COVID-19 to get tested within 3-5 days upon arrival in the US and stay at home for seven days, or to stay at home for 10 days upon arrival if they do not get tested.

As of Jan. 12, most countries and territories around the world are at Level 4, including most of Europe, most of Latin America, and Canada, as well as the US territories of Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. Only Grenada, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Lucia, and Turks and Caicos Island are at Level 3. There are 11 countries and territories at Level 2: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Equatorial Guinea, Faroe Islands, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Mauritius, Mongolia, Rwanda, Seychelles, and South Korea.

For travelers entering from countries and territories categorized as Level 1 – Low risk of COVID-19, officials recommend mask-wearing and maintaining social distancing from others upon arrival in the US. If travelers recently participated in high-risk activities – such as attending a mass gathering, being in a large crowd at a restaurant or bar, or traveling on a cruise – at a country at Level 1, authorities urge them to get tested 3-5 days upon return and remain at home for seven days, or 10 days if they do not get tested. As of Jan. 12, there are 45 countries and territories at Level 1, including Australia, China, Cote d’Ivoire, New Zealand, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.


MDTI-WA-2021-0013
Date: 13 January 2021

IRELAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 JANUARY 2021

Effective Jan. 16, all travelers arriving in Ireland will be required to produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to travel in order to be permitted entry.

Other international travel restrictions remain largely unchanged, however. Travelers from EU-designated areas of low COVID-19 activity (so-called “green” and “orange” regions) are not required to self-isolate upon entry. Travelers from areas of medium or high COVID-19 activity (grey and red regions, respectively) must self-isolate for 14 days; such persons, except for travelers from the UK and South Africa, may shorten their quarantine periods if they test negative after five days. Freight transport workers, maritime employees, and aircraft pilots are exempt from these measures. All arrivals must fill out a passenger locator form indicating the address where they will be staying.


MDTI-WA-2021-0012
Date: 13 January 2021

SPAIN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 JANUARY 2021

Spanish authorities have extended their existing ban on air and sea passenger travel with the UK until at least 1800 Feb. 2 as part of efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19); the measure had originally been due to expire Jan. 19. Spanish nationals and residents are exempt from the ban, which was imposed Dec. 22 in reaction to the discovery of a new variant of COVID-19 in the UK.

With regard to other international travel, most arrivals from outside the EEA are prohibited, except for those from Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Uruguay. Exceptions are in place for EEA nationals or residents, health care workers, goods and transport workers, other essential work, students, and for urgent family reasons. All permitted travelers arriving via air are required to fill out the government’s Health Control Form within 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a Quick Response Code (QR) that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this documentation may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without the negative test result or while displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates its country risk assessments on a weekly basis.


MDTI-WA-2021-0011
Date: 13 January 2021

CANADA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 JANUARY 2021

Authorities in Canada continue to enforce testing requirements for international air arrivals. All airline passengers aged 5 years or over who are traveling to Canada must provide the airline with proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using either a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test or a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departing for Canada. Travelers from Saint Pierre and Miquelon are exempt from this requirement until Jan. 14; travelers from Haiti are exempt until Jan. 21. Travelers from South America and the Caribbean are allowed to present results from tests taken within 96 hours of departure for Canada.

Additionally, a ban on entering Canada remains in force for most nonresident foreign nationals with those allowed to enter still being required to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country can enter, as well as immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents, provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay.

Other nonresident foreign nationals allowed to enter must be traveling for essential reasons and must travel either from the US or be exempt from the entry restrictions by virtue of being temporary workers, international students, diplomats, aircrew members, or French citizens who live in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. People working in trade, those who cross the border regularly, government officials, and others working in critical manufacturing may be exempted from the 14-day self-quarantine requirement, provided they do not display any COVID-19 symptoms.


MDTI-WA-2021-0010
Date: 13 January 2021

SWITZERLAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 JANUARY 2021

Tighter restrictions on international travel, as well as domestic business and other activities, will likely remain in force in Switzerland through at least late January as part of the nation’s efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

Under most circumstances, only citizens and residents of EEA countries, as well as those of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay, may enter Switzerland. However, as of Jan. 12 passengers entering from Andorra, Croatia, Denmark, Georgia, Ireland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Montenegro, Netherlands Panama, San Marino, Serbia, Slovenia, Sweden, South Africa, UK, US, Czech Republic, as well as the state of Saxony in Germany and the Veneto region in Italy, must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. The quarantine requirement does not apply to essential individuals traveling for business, medical purposes, or to transit travelers who have spent fewer than 24 hours in a high-risk country or territory. Travelers will not be allowed to shorten their self-quarantine if they receive a negative COVID-19 test result during the 10-day period. Other permitted travelers may enter without restrictions.

More stringent entry restrictions remain in effect for travelers from the UK and South Africa as of Jan. 12 as part of Switzerland’s response to a new strain of COVID-19 that was initially discovered in the southeast of England, UK. Travelers from both countries who are not Swiss citizens or permanent residents have been barred from entry into Switzerland indefinitely since Dec. 20. All travelers arriving from UK and South Africa must self-isolate upon arrival for 10 days.


MDTI-WA-2021-0009
Date: 13 January 2021

NEW ZEALAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 13 JANUARY 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials allow partners and dependents of citizens to return to the country, provided they have a visa based on the relationship or usually reside in New Zealand. Such travelers and diplomats posted in New Zealand can enter the country without obtaining prior government consent. Authorities permit partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas to enter the country. Entry is also possible for humanitarian reasons, Australian citizens and permanent residents who live in New Zealand, and Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments.

The government is also permitting some critical workers to travel to New Zealand. Companies must apply for a visa and demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. The government requires people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and will review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities continue to quarantine inbound passengers at government-designated facilities for 14 days. All arrivals must undergo two COVID-19 tests on days three and 12 of quarantine and receive a negative result before departing facilities. Officials have also extended the ban on cruise ships entering New Zealand ports; cargo and fishing vessels will be allowed to load and unload and undertake repairs. Vessel crews arriving in New Zealand must spend 14 days in quarantine unless they had been on the vessel for 28 days before docking at the port. Officials have instituted a quarantine fee structure for inbound travelers. Most travelers allowed into the country will have to pay NZD 3,100 (USD 2,225) for the first person and NZD 950 (USD 682) for each additional adult and NZD 475 (USD 341) per additional child. Officials do not charge for children under three years of age if they are staying with another person. New Zealand citizens, residence visa holders, and Australian citizens and permanent residents who typically reside in New Zealand are exempt from costs if they departed before Aug. 11 and intend to stay in the country longer than 90 days upon their return. Temporary visa holders are also exempt from fees if they were residents in New Zealand as of March 19 and were outside the country before that date. Companies can cover the quarantine costs for inbound critical workers.


MDTI-WA-2021-0008
Date: 12 January 2021

NEW ZEALAND- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 12 JANUARY 2021

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Officials allow partners and dependents of citizens to return to the country, provided they have a visa based on the relationship or usually reside in New Zealand. Such travelers and diplomats posted in New Zealand can enter the country without obtaining prior government consent. Authorities permit partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas to enter the country. Entry is also possible for humanitarian reasons, Australian citizens and permanent residents who live in New Zealand, and Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments.

The government is also permitting some critical workers to travel to New Zealand. Companies must apply for a visa and demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term essential workers to enter, provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. The government requires people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and will review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities continue to quarantine inbound passengers at government-designated facilities for 14 days. All arrivals must undergo two COVID-19 tests on days three and 12 of quarantine and receive a negative result before departing facilities. Officials have also extended the ban on cruise ships entering New Zealand ports; cargo and fishing vessels will be allowed to load and unload and undertake repairs. Vessel crews arriving in New Zealand must spend 14 days in quarantine unless they had been on the vessel for 28 days before docking at the port. Officials have instituted a quarantine fee structure for inbound travelers. Most travelers allowed into the country will have to pay NZD 3,100 (USD 2,225) for the first person and NZD 950 (USD 682) for each additional adult and NZD 475 (USD 341) per additional child. Officials do not charge for children under three years of age if they are staying with another person. New Zealand citizens, residence visa holders, and Australian citizens and permanent residents who typically reside in New Zealand are exempt from costs if they departed before Aug. 11 and intend to stay in the country longer than 90 days upon their return. Temporary visa holders are also exempt from fees if they were residents in New Zealand as of March 19 and were outside the country before that date. Companies can cover the quarantine costs for inbound critical workers.


MDTI-WA-2021-0007
Date: 12 January 2021

ASIA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 12 JANUARY 2021

Indonesia: Government has extended the entry ban for most foreigners and the rules for domestic travel through Jan. 25 to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). All international or non-rail domestic travelers must register on the Health Alert Card (eHAC) mobile application before travel and are advised to download the PeduliLindungi contact-tracing application. Exemptions from the foreigners’ entry ban are in place for high-level state visits and holders of Limited Stay Permit Cards, among others; the government’s level of enforcement is unclear. Returning Indonesian citizens and foreigners who can still enter the country must present evidence that they have tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours before departure, quarantine for five days at designated facilities upon arrival, and obtain a negative result from another COVID-19 test before leaving the isolation premises.

Vietnam: Foreigners remain banned from entering Vietnam, except foreign experts, investors, managers, skilled workers, and resident diplomats, among others. While short-term trips to Vietnam for leisure purposes remain banned, officials have started to reissue electronic visas to foreign nationals from 80 locations, including Australia, mainland China, India, Japan, New Zealand, the Philippines, South Korea, the UK, and the US.

Inbound commercial flights remain suspended until further notice. Chartered flights may operate on a case-by-case basis to transport Vietnamese citizens and foreign nationals who are allowed to enter the country. However, authorities have banned flights from South Africa and the UK, due to new COVID-19 variants from the two countries. Additionally, the government is limiting inbound repatriation flights through mid-February ahead of the Lunar New Year (known locally as Tet) holidays. Officials require people who can still enter Vietnam to test negative for COVID-19 within five days before the travel date, isolate at designated facilities for at least five days, and test for COVID-19 twice at the quarantine sites, with limited exemptions.

Cambodia: Health officials in Cambodia are maintaining international travel controls aimed at preventing the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity, while easing domestic businesses restrictions. Most schools have reopened from Jan. 11. Authorities have also lifted previous requirements closing several categories of nonessential businesses and venues, including cinemas and museums. With regard to international travel, Cambodia’s temporary cessation of issuing tourist visas and e-visas, visa-on-arrival services, and visa-free travel remains in effect. Foreign nationals intending to visit Cambodia must obtain a visa from a diplomatic mission; officials require proof of medical insurance coverage of at least USD 50,000 and a medical certificate from local health authorities issued no more than 72 hours before travel stating the individual is free from COVID-19. Travelers must take a COVID-19 test upon arrival and quarantine for 14 days at a government-designated facility. Inbound foreign nationals must pay a USD 2,000 deposit to cover costs, including USD 100 for COVID-19 testing and USD 30 for a certificate stating that they are free from the virus; only limited exceptions are allowed. Cambodia’s suspension of flights from Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines remains in effect.

Malaysia: Most foreigners remain banned from entering Malaysia; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions.

Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from 23 countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. The affected countries include Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the US. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.


MDTI-WA-2021-0006
Date: 11 January 2021

INDONESIA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 JANUARY 2021

Indonesia has extended the entry ban for most foreigners and the rules for domestic travel through Jan. 25 to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). All international or non-rail domestic travelers must register on the Health Alert Card (eHAC) mobile application before travel and are advised to download the PeduliLindungi contact-tracing application

Exemptions from the foreigners’ entry ban are in place for high-level state visits and holders of Limited Stay Permit Cards, among others; the government’s level of enforcement is unclear. Returning Indonesian citizens and foreigners who can still enter the country must present evidence that they have tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours before departure, quarantine for five days at designated facilities upon arrival, and obtain a negative result from another COVID-19 test before leaving the isolation premises.


MDTI-WA-2021-0005
Date: 11 January 2021

FRANCE- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 JANUARY 2021

Authorities are maintaining tighter entry restrictions for travelers from the UK until further notice in efforts to control the spread of a new strain of COVID-19 active in England. Most travelers from the UK remain barred from entry. Officials are allowing entry for French citizens and citizens of the European Economic Area (EEA), as well as permanent residents of the EU and individuals who are engaging in essential travel. Such individuals must produce proof of a negative COVID-19 test result no older than 72 hours before departure.

Under most circumstances, travelers from EU and Schengen Area states, as well as those from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and Thailand, can enter France. Most travelers from other locations remain barred from entry; however, exceptions are made for French nationals and residents, as well as for persons traveling for what authorities deem to be essential reasons, such as certain necessary workers, diplomats, students, and those visiting for urgent family business. All such arrivals must complete a form declaring themselves to be COVID-19-free and present a certificate declaring their reason for travel.

Permitted travelers arriving from Algeria, Bahrain, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ecuador, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, Morocco, Panama, South Africa, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, the US, and Zimbabwe must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before boarding their flights. Permitted arrivals from other countries must meet the same condition, take a test on arrival, and self-isolate until the result is known or for 14 days.



MDTI-WA-2021-0004
Date: 11 January 2021

GREECE- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 JANUARY 2021

International entry restrictions are also in place at least until Jan. 21. All passengers arriving in Greece must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for 7 days. Additionally, all arrivals from the UK must take a rapid antigen test upon entry and comply with the self-isolation requirement, even if the test is negative; random checks of arrivals from other locations will also take place. A second test, taken up to seven days after arrival, may be applicable. In the event a traveler receives a positive COVID-19 test result, they must self-isolate for at least 14 days. All international travelers must also complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form.

Entry is currently prohibited for all non-EEA nationals with certain exemptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, Rwanda, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the UK, the UAE, and Uruguay are also exempt from the travel ban.


MDTI-WA-2021-0003
Date: 11 January 2021

FINLAND- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 JANUARY 2021

Authorities in Finland plan to suspend commercial flights with Ireland and South Africa Jan. 11-18 as part of the nation’s response to the emergency of new strains of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Moreover, Finland’s existing suspension of flights with the UK, which entered into force Dec. 21 amid concerns over mutations in the virus, has been extended until at least Jan. 18. Authorities have also barred all travelers from the UK who are not Finnish citizens or residents from entry due to the same concerns.

Current COVID-19 international entry restrictions not directly related to the new disease strains will remain in place until at least Feb. 9. Travelers arriving from all Schengen Area countries, plus Andorra, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Monaco, Romania, San Marino, are only permitted to enter Finland if they are returning legal residents, traveling for essential purposes, or arriving for work-related or family reasons.

Authorities also advise that arrivals from the above locations self-isolate for 10 days upon entering the country. Travel remains permitted for local border communities along the borders with Sweden and Norway; people are able to travel for work to Finland from Sweden and Estonia without a 10-day self-isolation period. Leisure travel, with the exception of leisure boating, from all the aforementioned countries, is not allowed.

Authorities previously relaxed entry restrictions for travelers arriving from Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Thailand, and Vatican City; legal residents of these countries may enter Finland without restrictions. Travel is prohibited from all other countries except for returning residents and persons arriving for critical work-related or essential family reasons; authorities recommend that these arrivals also self-isolate for 10 days. Authorities are reviewing all entry restrictions on a weekly basis.

Authorities advise that travelers can shorten the necessary self-isolation period by taking two voluntary COVID-19 tests. Travelers should take the first test up to 72 hours before arrival, or at the airport upon arrival for Finnish citizens and residents, and the second test no earlier than 72 hours after entry into the country. Such individuals should remain in self-isolation until the result is known. If the test result is negative, the self-isolation period ends; if the test result is positive, the person will be placed in quarantine until they have recovered.


MDTI-WA-2021-0002
Date: 11 January 2021

DENMARK- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 JANUARY 2021

Authorities in Denmark are tightening international entry restrictions as part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of a new strain of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). From 1700 Jan. 9 through at least Jan.17, all arriving international air passengers above the age of 12 must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test taken no more than 24 hours before boarding their flights. In addition, all passengers must have a justifiable purpose for their travel, such as work, study, or family reasons. Flights from Greenland and the Faroe Islands are exempt from the requirement. Furthermore, authorities are recommending against all travel abroad Jan. 8-17.

Tighter entry restrictions remain in effect for travelers from the UK and South Africa as of Jan. 8. Authorities have barred travelers from the UK, and South Africa who are not Danish citizens or permanent residents from entering Denmark until Jan. 17, except for urgent family purposes. The move is directly related to concerns over the new COVID-19 virus mutation.


MDTI-WA-2021-0001
Date: 11 January 2021

UNITED KINGDOM- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 11 JANUARY 2021

Effective Jan. 8, all international travelers to England and Scotland must present proof of a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test result before departing their host nation; tests must be taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure. UK nationals returning from overseas are also subject to this restriction. Furthermore, travelers arriving from countries not on the government’s travel corridor list will still be required to self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival in the UK, regardless of the test result. Authorities in Wales and Northern Ireland will likely implement similar restrictions in due course.

International passengers of any nationality arriving from or who, within the previous 10 days, have been in locations not on the travel corridor list must self-isolate for up to 10 days upon entry into the UK. The exact duration of self-isolation depends upon when the traveler last departed a nonexempted destination. Health officials could perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodations are required to stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. Freight drivers and healthcare workers are typically exempt from the requirement. All international travelers entering the UK must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days.

Travelers arriving from or who have been in countries with elevated disease activity can reduce the required self-isolation period by taking a COVID-19 test at their own expense. Such individuals may be released from self-isolation upon receipt of a negative result. Nevertheless, travelers are not allowed to take the test until five full days have elapsed since the time they left a location not on the Travel Corridor List; test results may take up to 48 hours to return.


MDTI-WA-2020-1139
Date: 08 January 2021

EUROPEAN UNION – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 JANUARY 2021

The European Council is maintaining its advice for European Union (EU) member states to restrict nonessential travel from outside the bloc as part of measures to combat the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, the European Council also maintains a list of countries with which it recommends member states relax entry restrictions due to positive data regarding the COVID-19 situation in those countries. As of Jan, 7, the following countries are on this list: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China (provided they implement a reciprocal travel arrangement).

Countries participating in the measure comprise the so-called “EU+ Area,” which includes all EU Schengen Area member states; non-Schengen EU members Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania; and the four non-EU Schengen-associated states of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland. The European Council’s recommendation is advisory only; individual member states retain the authority to unilaterally deny travel from countries on the approved list or to permit travel with countries not on the approved list.

Additionally, the European Council issued advice Dec. 22 for member states to discourage all nonessential travel with the UK following the outbreak of a new variant of COVID-19 in that country. As a result, many countries have implemented tougher restrictions on travel with the UK including flight bans or testing and quarantine requirements for individuals arriving from the UK.

Moreover, following the end of the Brexit transition period Dec. 31 citizens of the UK are no longer being treated as EU citizens and are therefore subject to measures restricting travel to the EU from outside the bloc as per European Council recommendations. Persons exempted from the recommendations include family members of EU nationals, diplomats, foreigners with legal residency permits, cross-border and healthcare workers, and truck drivers transporting freight.


MDTI-WA-2020-1138
Date: 08 January 2021

JAPAN – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 JANUARY 2021

The government continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the country through Jan. 31 due to a new COVID-19 variant. Only Japanese citizens and resident foreign nationals can enter the country. The government is no longer honoring visas issued since Oct. 1. Officials require returning citizens and residents to present a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure. Inbound passengers with a negative test result can self-quarantine for 14 days, while passengers without test documentation must quarantine at designated locations.


MDTI-WA-2020-1137
Date: 08 January 2021

THAILAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 08 JANUARY 2021

Limited inbound tourist flights are operating. Cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft can continue operating. Thai authorities are allowing travelers from 56 locations to enter the country without visas. Passengers must still obtain a Certificate of Entry from a Thai embassy if they are foreigners, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip, provide evidence of a quarantine facility booking, and isolate for two weeks at the designated facilities upon arrival. Officials have increased the length of visas from 30 to 45 days. The 56 locations are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. People from all other locations must still obtain a special tourist visa to enter Thailand; these travelers must also quarantine at designated facilities for two weeks upon arrival.


MDTI-WA-2020-1137
Date: 07 January 2021

CANADA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 07 JANUARY 2021

The land border between the US and Canada will remain closed through at least Jan. 21. The measure, which has been in place since March 21, does not affect trade or essential business travel. An earlier ban on entry for most nonresident foreign nationals to Canada also continues to be in place until at least Jan. 21. Under these measures, Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country can enter but must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents can also enter, provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay.

Other nonresident foreign nationals allowed to enter must be traveling for essential reasons and must travel either from the US or be exempt from the restrictions by virtue of being temporary workers, international students, diplomats, aircrew members, or French citizens who live in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. People working in trade, those who cross the border regularly, government officials, and others working in critical manufacturing may be exempted from the 14-day self-quarantine requirement, as long as they do not display any COVID-19 symptoms.

All international flights to Canada – except for trade and business flights or flights from the US, Mexico, the Caribbean, and St. Pierre and Miquelon – are landing only at Pearson International Airport (YYZ) in Toronto, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Montreal Trudeau Airport (YUL), and Calgary International Airport (YYC). All air passengers must wear protective face coverings, and all maritime and land passengers are encouraged to do the same.

Starting Jan. 7, authorities in Canada will enforce new testing requirements for international air arrivals. All airline passengers from abroad aged 5 years and over must present a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure to Canada. Persons with a negative PCR test result and who are authorized to enter Canada must still complete the mandatory 14-day self-quarantine.

Persons exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to board planes to Canada, including Canadian citizens. Canadian authorities have also banned individuals displaying symptoms associated with COVID-19 from domestic air and train travel until further notice. Travelers who are denied boarding are also barred from air or train travel for at least 14 days unless they can produce a medical certificate confirming that any symptoms are unrelated to COVID-19.


MDTI-WA-2020-1136
Date: 07 January 2021

CHINA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 07 JANUARY 2021

Authorities are maintaining a ban on foreign nationals traveling from specific countries, including Belgium, France, Russia, the Philippines, India, Italy, Bangladesh, the UK, Ukraine, and Ethiopia. The restrictions do not apply to Chinese nationals, foreign diplomatic passport holders, and individuals with C visas. Foreign nationals from other countries with valid residence permits for work, visiting family, and personal matters currently can re-enter China. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters issued by provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain visas to enter for emergency humanitarian purposes. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders – generally flight and shipping crew members – are exempt from entry bans. Officials have also banned flights to and from the UK until further notice.

Authorities require most arriving passengers from abroad to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure for China. Officials require all authorized inbound passengers from specified countries to provide evidence of both nucleic acid COVID-19 and IgM antibody tests from designated facilities in the departure country within 48 hours of boarding flights and undergo additional COVID-19 tests in each country they transit. As of Dec. 4, the measure applies to travelers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Denmark, Egypt, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, the UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam. Authorities will likely further expand the testing requirements to other countries in the coming days and weeks, possibly at short notice. Most travelers, regardless of nationality or residency, are barred from using land border crossings. Exceptions are in place for cargo transport, though backlogs remain possible at border checkpoints.

All authorized passengers must apply for a health certificate via the local Chinese diplomatic mission before travel. Chinese citizens must update their information through WeChat to obtain a health code before boarding flights. The government continues to conduct health screenings, including body temperature scans and nucleic acid testing, at ports of entry nationwide. Most international travelers must quarantine for 14 days, and officials generally allow nonresident passengers to stay in government-designated hotels at their own cost. However, some governments require inbound travelers to self-quarantine and undergo medical observation for three or four weeks. All arrivals must receive a negative COVID-19 test result in quarantine before release from designated facilities.


MDTI-WA-2020-1135
Date: 07 January 2021

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 07 JANUARY 2021

As of Dec. 24, international tourists are permitted entry into Abu Dhabi Emirate as part of ongoing COVID-19 controls. Under the new measures, international travelers from “green” countries must present a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result received within 96 hours of their departure for the UAE. The list of “green” countries can be found on the UAE Government website. Upon entering the emirate, travelers will undergo a PCR test. With two negative results, international travelers will not have to quarantine for 10 days. After arrival, travelers from green countries will need to take a third PCR test on day six for those staying for six days or more, and a fourth test on day 12 for those staying for 12 days or more. Country classifications will be subject to review every two weeks.

For visitors entering the emirate from all other countries, procedures include the following: depending on where a person is traveling from, a PCR test must be carried out between 48, 72, or 96 hours ahead of departure. Travelers will undergo a PCR test on arrival to the emirate. An additional PCR test will be required six days after arrival. Another PCR test will be required 12 days after arrival for travelers who are staying for 12 days or more. Travelers will have to wear an electronic wristband throughout their 10-day quarantine. If a traveler receives a negative result, 10 days after arrival in Abu Dhabi, the electronic wristband will be removed by authorities.

Other measures in effect in the UAE include:
– Upon arrival at all airports in the UAE, stringent entry restrictions are enforced and may include a PCR test on arrival, a health declaration form, obtaining health insurance with COVID-19 coverage, a mandatory quarantine period for at least 14 days, and follow-up testing before the completion of quarantine.
– All travelers to the UAE must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result within 96 hours before their departure. Residents returning to Dubai still require approval before traveling. Those returning to other parts of the UAE no longer need approval.
– All travelers entering Abu Dhabi by road must have a negative PCR test result issued within 48 hours. Travelers may have to quarantine depending on how long they have been in the UAE. If a traveler has just arrived in another emirate and travels straight to Abu Dhabi, they must have a negative COVID 19 PCR test result issued within 48 hours and take a diffractive phase interferometry (DPI) test at the border. Additional PCR tests will be required depending on the length of an individual’s stay in Abu Dhabi.
– If departing from Abu Dhabi to the EU or UK, travelers will need to have a negative PCR test result taken within 96 hours prior to their departure.
– Stringent precautionary measures will continue to be enforced in public areas and facilities across the UAE based on guidelines issued by local and federal authorities.
– Arrivals in Abu Dhabi from countries that authorities consider high risk are likely to be required to quarantine for at least 14 days. These include but are not limited to Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Chile. Additional high-risk countries can be found on the UAE Government website.

MDTI-WA-2020-1134
Date: 07 January 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 07 JANUARY 2021

Spain: Most arrivals from outside of the EEA, Switzerland, Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay are prohibited. Exceptions are in place for EU nationals or residents, health care workers, goods and transport workers, other essential work, students, and for urgent family reasons. Authorities have suspended air and sea transport with the UK except for Spanish nationals and residents until at least Jan. 19 following the outbreak of a new strain of COVID-19 in the country. All permitted travelers arriving via air are required to fill out the Health Control Form within the 48 hours prior to arrival. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a Quick Response Code (QR) that they must show at the port of entry. Travelers from countries designated as high risk by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must possess a negative COVID-19 test taken within the 72 hours prior to arrival. The document must be in Spanish or English and can be submitted in either electronic or paper format. Passengers who attempt to travel without this requirement may be prohibited from boarding by the travel provider. Individuals who arrive in Spain without this requirement or displaying COVID-19 symptoms will be required to take a test on arrival. The ECDC updates its country risk assessments on a weekly basis.

Luxembourg: There are currently no entry restrictions on travelers from countries within the European Union or Schengen Area, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and Vatican City. Moreover, residents of Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay are also permitted to enter the country. Most travelers from other countries, including the UK, remain prohibited from entry. Exceptions are in place for essential work, study, and family reasons; all such individuals arriving via air require evidence of a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result taken within 48 hours prior to departing for Luxembourg; those in possession of a negative test result taken within the previous 48-72 hours must take a further test on arrival and self-isolate until the result has been confirmed.

Italy: Authorities maintain extensive international travel restrictions. As of Dec. 23, travelers from the UK will be barred from entry unless they are official residents of Italy or are traveling for an essential reason, which must be declared in writing. Travelers must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 72 hours before departure. Travelers must also take a COVID-19 test on arrival in Italy. Regardless of the test results, travelers from the UK are also required to present themselves to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days.

Aside from the UK-specific measures, other international entry restrictions remain in force. All arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival; this requirement also applies to travelers from EU countries who had previously been exempt. All international arrivals, except those from San Marino and Vatican City, must also fill out a self-declaration form prior to arrival, which must be presented to authorities upon request. Travel from outside the EEA, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, Switzerland, or Uruguay is currently prohibited except when conducted for study, proven work needs, or urgent reasons such as health; all such travelers must register and self-isolate for 14 days on arrival. Transport and health workers, individuals in transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours (five days) for work reasons are not required to self-isolate.

Portugal: Authorities in Portugal permit entry for travelers from the EU and Schengen Area countries, Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay; these arrivals do not require a COVID-19 test unless their final destination is the Azores or Madeira. Travel from other countries remains prohibited, except for limited essential reasons, including EU citizens and residents returning home, reuniting with family, and commuting to essential work or study. All such arrivals are required to submit a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours before boarding; however, Portuguese nationals and residents may arrange to take the test on arrival at their own expense.


MDTI-WA-2020-1133
Date: 06 January 2021

GERMANY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 06 JANUARY 2021

Authorities will amending certain international entry restrictions from Jan. 10. From this date travelers arriving in the country who have visited risk areas within the previous 10 days will have provide a negative COVID-19 test no older than 48 hours upon arrival, or take a test as soon as they arrive in the country. In addition, these travelers will need to self-isolate for 10-days; the self-isolation can be ended on day five with a second negative test. As of Jan. 5, Germany’s federal disease control and prevention agency, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), has designated numerous locations, including the UK, Spain, and Portugal as risk areas.

Most travelers from outside of the EEA, with the exception of those from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Thailand, the UK, and Uruguay, remain prohibited from entry. Limited exceptions are made for EEA citizens and residents, diplomats, essential workers, students, freight and transport workers, individuals in transit, and for urgent reasons decided on a case-by-case basis. All such arrivals are subject to a mandatory self-isolation period as detailed above; this measure does not apply to transport and freight workers.


MDTI-WA-2020-1132
Date: 06 January 2021

DENMARK – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 06 JANUARY 2021

As part of ongoing efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), authorities in Denmark are tightening domestic restrictions beginning Jan. 6. Public gatherings will be limited to five people, a decrease from the previously allotted 10 people. In addition, authorities strongly advise against all private gatherings of more than five people.

International travel restrictions on most foreign nationals remain in effect. Authorities categorize countries as “open,” “quarantine,” or “high-risk” based on infection rates and other health indicators in those countries. Travelers from open countries are permitted entry to Denmark for any reason and are not required to present a negative COVID-19 test result. Travelers from quarantine countries or regions may travel into Denmark if they have a recognizable purpose for the trip. Travelers from banned countries and regions are only permitted entry for specifically defined purposes, such as work, study, or family reasons, and must present a negative COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.


MDTI-WA-2020-1131
Date: 06 January 2021

CANADA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 06 JANUARY 2021

The land border between the US and Canada will remain closed through at least Jan. 21. The measure, which has been in place since March 21, does not affect trade or essential business travel. An earlier ban on entry for most nonresident foreign nationals to Canada also continues to be in place until at least Jan. 21. Under these measures, Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country can enter but must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents can also enter, provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay.

Other nonresident foreign nationals allowed to enter must be traveling for essential reasons and must travel either from the US or be exempt from the restrictions by virtue of being temporary workers, international students, diplomats, aircrew members, or French citizens who live in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. People working in trade, those who cross the border regularly, government officials, and others working in critical manufacturing may be exempted from the 14-day self-quarantine requirement, as long as they do not display any COVID-19 symptoms.

All international flights to Canada – except for trade and business flights or flights from the US, Mexico, the Caribbean, and St. Pierre and Miquelon – are landing only at Pearson International Airport (YYZ) in Toronto, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Montreal Trudeau Airport (YUL), and Calgary International Airport (YYC). All air passengers are required to wear protective face coverings, and all maritime and land passengers are encouraged to do the same. Officials in Canada have extended a ban on all commercial and private passenger flights from the UK until at least Jan. 6, due to the detection of a variant strain of COVID-19 found in that country.

Persons exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to board planes to Canada, including Canadian citizens. Canadian authorities have also banned individuals displaying symptoms associated with COVID-19 from domestic air and train travel until further notice. Travelers who are denied boarding are also barred from air or train travel for at least 14 days unless they can produce a medical certificate confirming that any symptoms are unrelated to COVID-19.

Canada maintains tightened border restrictions for persons transiting the country on essential travel to reach Alaska from the 48 contiguous US states (“Lower 48”). Foreign nationals traveling by land to Alaska from the US Lower 48 may only enter Canada through one of five border crossings: Abbotsford-Huntington, Kingsgate, or Osoyoos in British Columbia; North Portal, Saskatchewan; or Coutts, Alberta. Travelers who attempt to enter Canada through any other border crossing will be denied entry and rerouted to an approved crossing. Persons entering Canada from Alaska may use any border crossing. The regulations specify that travelers must take the most direct route through Canada and avoid stopping at leisure sites or national parks. Violators could face fines.


MDTI-WA-2020-1130
Date: 06 January 2021

BELGIUM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF 06 JANUARY 2021

Authorities in Belgium are maintaining measures introduced to combat the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Jan. 5. Travel is permitted with EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, and Thailand, though in many cases travel is strongly discouraged. Nonessential travel from all other locations is prohibited. All arrivals staying in Belgium for more than 48 hours are required to fill in a Passenger Locator Form within 48 hours before arrival.

In addition, the government has designated certain locations with high COVID-19 activity as “red zones.” As of Jan. 2, all countries are designated red zones except for Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, and South Korea, and limited areas within Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, and Spain. Travel with red zone countries is either strongly discouraged or prohibited. All individuals arriving in Belgium having spent 48 hours or more in a red zone must self-isolate on arrival and may only leave self-isolation following a negative result for a COVID-19 test taken no less than seven days after arrival. Additionally, non-residents having spent 48 hours in a red zone must present proof of a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival before entering the country, while residents may instead take a test on arrival; exceptions apply to crossborder commuters.


MDTI-WA-2020-1122
Date: 04 January 2021

EUROPE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF JANUARY 4, 2021

France: Under most circumstances, travelers from EU and Schengen Area states, as well as those from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Switzerland, South Korea, and Thailand, can enter France. Most travelers from other locations remain barred from entry, though exceptions are made for French nationals and residents, as well as for persons traveling for what authorities deem to be essential reasons, such as certain necessary workers, diplomats, students, and those visiting for urgent family business. All such arrivals must complete a form declaring themselves to be COVID-19 free and present a certificate declaring their reason for travel. Permitted travelers arriving from Algeria, Bahrain, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ecuador, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, Morocco, Panama, South Africa, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, the US, and Zimbabwe must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours prior to boarding their flights. Permitted arrivals from other countries must meet the same condition, take a test on arrival, and self-isolate until the result is known or for 14 days.

Tighter entry restrictions remain in effect for travelers from the UK through at least Jan. 6, as part of France’s response to a new strain of COVID-19 discovered primarily in the southeast of England, including London. Most travelers from the UK remain barred from entry. Entry will be permitted for French citizens and citizens of the European Economic Area (EEA), as well as permanent residents of the EU and individuals who are engaging in essential travel. Such individuals must produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test taken no more than 72 hours before departure.

Norway: As part of ongoing efforts to reopen the economy amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, health officials in Norway will lift the country’s travel ban on flights with the UK beginning 1600 Jan. 2. The government, however, continues to advise against all international travel that is not essential. Norway was among several European nations, which suspended travel with the UK after a more contagious variant of COVID-19 was discovered in England. In addition to lifting the travel ban with the UK, health officials are mandating COVID-19 tests for all people arriving in Norway, regardless of a traveler’s point of origin, either directly upon arrival or up to 24 hours after entering the country.

Previously imposed health measures and regulations will remain in effect until at least Jan. 10:
– Travelers from the UK must self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival.
– Travelers must take a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for COVID-19 within 24 hours of arrival in Norway. A second test must be taken no sooner than day seven after arrival.
– All travelers who arrived in Norway in the 14 days prior to Dec. 21 must take a PCR test for COVID-19 as soon as possible.
– Quarantine exemptions in place for incoming travelers of certain nationalities will not apply when those travelers are arriving from the UK.

Travelers from most other countries are currently prohibited from entering Norway. Individuals with close family in Norway or who have been granted permits to work or study in the country are exempt from the travel ban but must meet the same entry requirements as those traveling from a high-risk location. Authorities continue to advise against nonessential travel abroad.

Greece: Government has temporarily reduced its mandatory quarantine period for arriving travelers from 10 days to three days; the reduced requirement will be in effect through Jan. 7. All passengers arriving in Greece must present a negative result from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival. Additionally, travelers must also take a rapid antigen test upon entry and comply with the self-isolation requirement, even if the test is negative. In the event a traveler receives a positive COVID-19 test result, the individual will need to self-isolate until authorities advise otherwise. All international travelers must also complete Greece’s Passenger Locator Form. Authorities prohibit entry for all non-EEA nationals with certain exemptions, such as healthcare workers, permanent residents of an EU or Schengen Area country, diplomats, student visa holders, seasonal workers, passengers in transit, and transport workers. Citizens of Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, Rwanda, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, the UK, the UAE, and Uruguay are also exempt from the travel ban.


MDTI-WA-2020-1121
Date: 04 January 2021

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF JANUARY 4, 2021

Brunei: Most foreign nationals, including long-term pass holders, remain banned from entering or transiting Brunei. Exemptions include foreigners whose work relates to matters of national interest, such as the oil and gas sector and the transport of essential goods. Existing travel, student, and dependent visas remain suspended, with limited exceptions. People who can enter Brunei must test for COVID-19 before departure and upon arrival. Arrivals must quarantine between 2-14 days at government-designated facilities, depending on the risk level of the country of departure. Travelers can leave the isolation sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. Authorities will consider appeals from foreigners in special situations, such as those on scholarship studies or undergoing medical treatment in Brunei, to enter the country. Foreigners permitted entry in such cases must obtain a Bruneian citizen or entity as a guarantor.

Foreigners with essential or business needs can transit through Brunei by land, with protocols in place. Measures include limiting the travel duration, such as one hour for those going from Labu to Ujong Jalan in eastern Brunei or three hours for travelers from Kuala Lurah to Sungai Tujoh in western Brunei. Foreigners, including transit passengers and commercial vehicle operators, must provide results of a negative COVID-19 swab test taken within seven days before arrival in Brunei. Registered persons must pay entry/exit fees of BND 3 (USD 2.3) for each one-way trip across land borders; exempted travelers include children below the age of two years, diplomats and families, and those with emergency passes or on official duty. Regular travelers – with proof of at least 15 monthly round trips to Brunei – may apply online for the Frequent Commuters Pass. Foreign-registered vehicles must also register with the Land Department and obtain a paid vehicle pass sticker.

Singapore: Most short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who do not provide essential services, remain banned from entering Singapore. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling to Singapore. Incoming passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. Foreign nationals traveling from most locations must test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip. While foreigners traveling from locations that officials consider to be lower-risk do not need to take pre-trip tests, these passengers must undergo tests upon arrival.

Arrivals from most locations must serve their SHN for 14 days at designated sites. Travelers who spent the previous two weeks in mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan can serve a seven-day SHN in their residence. Arrivals from Fiji, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, and Thailand can serve SHN at their residence for two weeks if they fulfill specific requirements. The travelers must have spent the previous 14 days in the aforementioned locations and must serve their SHN at the accommodation alone or with other travelers with the same travel history.

Long-term pass holders and short-term travelers who have been in the UK within the previous 14 days cannot enter Singapore. Singaporean citizens and PRs with recent travel history in the UK are subject to a two-week quarantine at dedicated SHN facilities. Additionally, short-term travelers who have been in Australia’s New South Wales (NSW) within the previous two weeks cannot enter Singapore. Singaporean citizens, PRs, and long-term pass holders with recent travel history in NSW must isolate at their own residence for a week. Authorities are allowing entry for all travelers from Taiwan, Brunei, mainland China, New Zealand, Vietnam, and areas in Australia outside of NSW. The passengers must have remained in the mentioned locations for the last 14 days before entry, register online within one week before entry, and self-isolate until on-arrival test results are ready. Travelers who test negative are exempt from the typical compulsory SHN requirement for arrivals.

Malaysia: Most foreigners remain banned from entering the country; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Travelers must seek advance approval from authorities, undergo tests for COVID-19 upon arrival, and download the MySejahtera contact tracing application. Arrivals must quarantine at designated sites for 10 days. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through immigration points. Malaysian nationals remain banned from traveling abroad, with limited exceptions. Sabah State bans entry for travelers, including long-term pass holders, from 23 countries. Exceptions are in place for diplomats and their dependents, workers in the oil and gas industry, and vessel crew. The affected countries include Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the US. Sabah allows entry for visitors from Brunei for any purposes, provided these travelers test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before travel and arrive by air or land.

Macau: Officials continue to ban most foreign nationals from entering Macau. Exceptions are in place for some foreign nationals related to Macau residents, students, and essential workers. Authorities require a 21-day quarantine for all arrivals outside of Taiwan and mainland China. Authorities allow residents of mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau to enter the territory if they have not been to any other locations in the previous 21 days. Individuals from low-risk areas of mainland China must submit a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test taken within seven days upon arrival. Travelers from Hong Kong must submit a negative COVID-19 test issued within 24 hours of arrival and undergo 21 days of quarantine under medical observation. Visitors from Taiwan need to submit a negative COVID-19 test administered within seven days of arrival and quarantine for 14 days. Travelers must pay quarantine fees of USD 700; locals are exempt from the quarantine fee for their first entry but must pay for subsequent quarantine periods unless traveling for select purposes.

Indonesia: Indonesia continues to adjust restrictions to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Jan. 4. Authorities have suspended the entry of foreign citizens through Jan. 14 due to concerns over a new COVID-19 strain. Exemptions are in place for high-level state visits and holders of Limited Stay Permit Cards, among others; the government’s level of enforcement is unclear. Returning Indonesian citizens and foreigners who can still enter the country must present evidence that they have tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours before departure, quarantine for five days at designated facilities upon arrival, and obtain a negative result from another COVID-19 test before leaving the isolation premises. A nationwide public health emergency remains in effect until further notice. Enhanced testing requirements for domestic travel remain in effect through Jan. 8. All air, rail, and sea passengers aged above 12 years must produce negative results of a rapid antigen or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for COVID-19 within a specified duration when undertaking select domestic trips. Other passengers may continue traveling with a rapid antigen test result taken no longer than 14 days before travel. All international or non-rail domestic travelers must register on the Health Alert Card (eHAC) mobile application before travel and are advised to download the PeduliLindungi contact-tracing application.

Saudi Arabia: The Saudi government has lifted a ban on all international flights and the closure of its land and sea borders to travelers effective 1100 Jan. 3. Some restrictions remain in place over concerns of a new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) variant. Non-Saudis arriving from the United Kingdom, South Africa, and other countries where a new variant of the virus has been detected must remain outside of these countries for 14 days before entering the Kingdom. Saudi nationals are permitted entry into the Kingdom from countries where the new variant has been found but will have to quarantine for 14 days and be subject to two PCR exams. The move follows a number of more targeted travel bans by several other countries in reaction to the new disease variant, which was initially discovered in the southeast of England. Arrivals from non-restricted areas will be subject to a maximum of seven days quarantine; however, the quarantine period will be reduced to three days upon the completion of a PCR test.


MDTI-WA-2020-1120
Date: 29 December 2020

INDIA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 29, 2020

Officials have banned flights to and from the UK through 2359 Dec. 31 due to concerns over a new COVID-19 strain. Those who have entered India with a travel history to the UK are likely to be contacted by local health officials for mandatory testing and enhanced quarantine. Authorities are advising Indian citizens to delay all nonessential international travel. Officials allow persons of all nationalities to enter the country through air or seaports on any visa type other than tourism. Indian consulates will issue new visas upon approval; authorities will also consider existing visas – except electronic, medical, and tourist categories – as valid. Foreign nationals already in the country can apply online to avail of a free visa extension valid for 30 days after regular international commercial flights resume.

Inbound international passenger flights remain limited to charter, repatriation, and approved flights under bilateral “air bubble” agreements. Air bubbles are operational or planned between India and countries including Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Canada, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Iraq, Japan, Kenya, Maldives, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Oman, Qatar, Rwanda, Tanzania, UAE, Ukraine, and the US. Similar arrangements with other countries, as well as modifications at short notice, are possible. International passengers must register via the Air Suvidha online portal within 72 hours before departure; arrivals must undergo a paid institutional quarantine of seven days, followed by a week-long home quarantine. Exemptions from institutional quarantine are possible for some categories of asymptomatic passengers, including those with a negative swab test for COVID-19 obtained within 72 hours before entry or upon arrival at an airport with testing facilities, requiring special care such as elderly or pregnant women and parents accompanied by children aged below 10 years. Passengers availing on-arrival paid testing facilities – currently available at the Cochin, Delhi, Hyderabad, and Mumbai airports – must pre-book tests via the Air Suvidha portal and wait eight hours for negative test results before boarding a connecting flight or exiting the airport. Different states may impose variable quarantine and testing requirements; those seeking exemptions and waivers must do so from authorities in all intended destinations and transit states before arrival.

Officials allow some foreign citizens, residents, and long-term visa holders stranded in India to buy seats on flights leaving India. The flights operate primarily to repatriate stranded Indian nationals. These flights serve airports in several countries, including the US, Bangladesh, Malaysia, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and multiple Central Asian nations.


MDTI-WA-2020-1119
Date: 29 December 2020

SOUTH AFRICA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 29, 2020

As of Dec. 28, South African authorities are maintaining various international travel restrictions to curb COVID-19 transmission.

Three international airports are open for the entry and departure of foreign travelers, namely O.R. Tambo (JNB), Cape Town International (CPT), and King Shaka International Airport (DUR).

Currently, 18 land ports of entry are fully operational; however, 35 border posts remain closed due to insufficient screening, testing, and quarantine capacity. Small passenger craft maritime travel is allowed to resume; however, the government continues to ban all cruise ships from docking.

Those entering South Africa will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival in the country.

All travelers will undergo screening upon arrival. Those showing symptoms of COVID-19 will be required to take a test. Travelers who test positive will be subject to mandatory quarantine for up to 10 days at a designated facility. Authorities also require travelers to show proof of accommodation should they need to self-quarantine when they arrive in the country.

Travelers departing South Africa will be subject to screening. Those found to have had COVID-19 may be subject to further testing. The outcome of the test will determine whether or not the person may depart the country, as determined by the Director-General of Health or a delegated person. Travelers testing positive will need to self-isolate; this may take place at one’s private residence.


MDTI-WA-2020-1118
Date: 29 December 2020

RUSSIA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 29, 2020

Authorities in Russia have extended the existing suspension of all commercial flights with the UK which they implemented in response to a new strain of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that had been discovered primarily in the southeast of England, including London. The measure was initially slated to expire on Dec. 29 but will no remain in effect until at least 2359 Jan. 12. Moreover, all persons arriving from UK must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in Russia.

Aside from the UK flight suspension, international flights are operating between Russia and more than 30 countries, including Armenia, Belarus, Cuba, France, Greece, Germany, the Czech Republic, Italy, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Netherlands, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Turkey, and the US. However, the availability of flights is still dependent on COVID-19 restrictions in destination countries. Additionally, flights with low demand could be canceled or merged with other scheduled departures. Foreign air passengers must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test performed no more than 72 hours prior to their departure for Russia; Russian citizens must produce a negative COVID-19 test within three days upon arrival or self-isolate for 14 days. Foreigners are not allowed entry for tourism purposes.


MDTI-WA-2020-1117
Date: 29 December 2020

KUWAIT- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 29, 2020

Authorities in Kuwait plan to resume international commercial flights beginning Jan. 1 and reopen the nation’s land and sea borders between the hours of 0900-1500 beginning Jan. 2. Kuwait had previously suspended all commercial flights and closed the country’s land and sea borders from Dec. 21 amid concerns regarding the spread of a newly discovered coronavirus disease (COVID-19) strain. The closure does not apply to cargo operations.

Prior to the flight suspension, authorities were permitting Kuwaiti nationals and residents to fly into and out of the country. Special entry directives implemented to control the spread of COVID-19 require arrivals to produce proof of having tested negative for the virus using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test performed no more than 96 hours before their departure for Kuwait. Travelers will not be permitted entry to Kuwait if, in the preceding 14 days, they have been in a country Kuwait considers high risk for COVID-19. Upon arrival, all travelers are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine and must provide proof of insurance with COVID-19 coverage. Travelers must also download and register with the “Shlonik” application before traveling.

MDTI-WA-2020-1116
Date: 29 December 2020

MYANMAR- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 29, 2020

International commercial passenger flights remain suspended through at least Dec. 31, though relief and cargo flights can continue operating. Additionally, authorities may also allow special flights to transport citizens to and from Myanmar on a case-by-case basis. Visa-on-arrival and e-visa services remain suspended. Exemptions to entry bans include resident diplomats and UN officials. Returning Myanmar nationals must undergo a 21-day quarantine at government-designated sites, followed by one week of self-isolation. Resident diplomats and UN officials may undergo quarantine at their residence for two weeks. Additionally, authorities also permit business trips for those working in important sectors, such as oil, gas, and power, from mainland China and Japan in a so-called “fast-lane” arrangement, with protocols in place. Safeguards for the fast-lane arrangements include requiring travelers to present a medical document attesting that they are COVID-19-negative no more than 36 hours prior to boarding flights, taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Myanmar, and isolating at designated facilities. The land border remains closed to passenger transit, though goods transport can continue.


MDTI-WA-2020-1115
Date: 28 December 2020

USA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 28, 2020

US authorities have announced that effective Dec. 28, all persons traveling by air from the UK to the US will be required to present a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antigen test taken no more than 72 hours before departing the UK. The new order is in response to a new strain of COVID-19 in the UK. Some international commercial airlines may require proof of a negative COVID-19 test for travel from the UK to the US ahead of Dec. 28.

The measure is in addition to the existing pandemic-related entry ban for most nonresident foreign nationals who have been in the UK and Ireland, as well as Brazil, China (excluding Hong Kong and Macau), Iran, Ireland, and the European Schengen Area within the previous 14 days. US citizens and legal residents who have traveled to a country on the restricted list within 14 days prior to their return are allowed to enter the country but are urged to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines in place specific to the destination they are traveling from. Officials have added exceptions for nonresident foreign nationals entering from the Schengen Area, UK, or Ireland to enter the US. Business travelers, students, investors, academics, and journalists, among others, may qualify for a national interest exception but must contact US diplomatic offices in order to apply.
Officials will also continue to enforce the closure of the nation’s land borders with Canada and Mexico to all nonessential travel through at least Jan. 21, 2021 due to COVID-19. The closures, initially implemented March 21, do not affect trade, movement of essential goods and workers, transport of food or medicine, or transit by cargo trucks. US citizens and legal residents returning to the country, as well as individuals traveling to attend educational institutions, are also exempt.


MDTI-WA-2020-1114
Date: 28 December 2020

ASIA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 28, 2020

Indonesia: Most foreign nationals remain banned from entering and transiting the country. Exemptions are in place for permanent residents, diplomats, and transport workers, among others. Arrivals must produce documents stating they are free from COVID-19; travelers without the certificates will undergo tests upon arrival and isolate at government-designated sites until test results are released. Authorities advise arrivals to self-quarantine for up to 14 days.

Cross-border travel arrangements for business and official purposes are in place with mainland China, Singapore, South Korea, and the United Arab Emirates. People entering Indonesia under the scheme must have a sponsoring Indonesian entity, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before departure, and receive another test upon arrival. Indonesia has set up a similar scheme with Japan, though the start date is unclear. Officials also require people leaving Indonesia to produce certificates stating they do not carry COVID-19.

Japan: Government of Japan will ban the entry of foreign nationals into the country Dec. 28-Jan 31, 2021 due to a new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) variant. Only Japanese nationals and resident foreign nationals will be permitted to return during this period. Furthermore, visas issued since Oct. 1 will not be honored. Officials will require returning citizens and residents to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the country. In addition, since Dec. 27, they must present a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure to be permitted to self-quarantine; those without documentation may have to stay at designated quarantine facilities.

China: Authorities in mainland China have banned all flights to and from the UK as of Dec. 24. Officials stated that the measure is due to the spread of a variant strain of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) detected in the UK. It is unclear how long the ban will be in place. Separately, authorities are maintaining border restrictions, including testing requirements, and domestic restrictions in specific areas amid ongoing efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19. Officials have lifted most internal commercial and transport restrictions nationwide, though controls are highly likely in areas where COVID-19 outbreaks occur.

Authorities are maintaining a ban on foreign nationals traveling from specific countries, including Belgium, France, Russia, the Philippines, India, Italy, Bangladesh, the UK, Ukraine, and Ethiopia. The restrictions do not apply to Chinese nationals, foreign diplomatic passport holders, and individuals with C visas. Foreign nationals from other countries with valid residence permits for work, visiting family, and personal matters currently can re-enter China. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters issued by provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain visas to enter for emergency humanitarian purposes. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders – generally flight and shipping crew members – are exempt from entry bans. Authorities require most arriving passengers from abroad to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure for China. Officials require all authorized inbound passengers from specified countries to provide evidence of both nucleic acid COVID-19 and IgM antibody tests from designated facilities in the departure country within 48 hours of boarding flights and undergo additional COVID-19 tests in each country they transit. As of Dec. 4, the measure applies to travelers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Denmark, Egypt, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, the UAE, the UK, the US, and Vietnam.

Saudi Arabia: The Saudi government has extended its ban on all international flights and the closure of its land and sea borders to travelers through at least Jan. 3, 2021, due to concerns over the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) variant. Non-Saudi citizens currently in the country, however, will be allowed to leave. The closure also does not apply to freight and goods shipments from countries where the virus mutation has not manifested. The move follows a number of more targeted travel bans by several other countries in reaction to the new disease variant, which was initially discovered in the southeast of England. Saudi authorities could extend the closure depending on disease activity in the coming weeks.

Qatar: Qatari authorities have extended the mandatory quarantine requirements for all arrivals into the country through Feb. 15, 2021, to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The quarantine period of one week remains in place for arrivals, regardless of the destination. Individuals, including nationals, residents, and visa holders, arriving from “high-risk” countries must quarantine at hotels, whereas individuals from “low-risk” countries can quarantine at home. The measures do not apply to those who use shared quarantine facilities; they must continue to quarantine for two weeks. Individuals who have not obtained a COVID-19 test 48 hours before arrival have to take the test upon arriving at Doha International Airport (DOH). Authorities will conduct a second COVID-19 test six days after arrival. Additionally, following the discovery of a new strain of COVID-19, individuals arriving from Denmark, the Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, and the UK must enter a seven-night quarantine at a government-designated hotel. Individuals are required to provide proof of hotel reservation before boarding their flights to Qatar


MDTI-WA-2020-1110
Date: 18 December 2020

MALDIVES – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 18, 2020

Maldives could exempt asymptomatic entrants with proof of recovery from COVID-19 within the previous 90 days before entry from testing and quarantine upon prior application and review. All other tourists and short-term visitors arriving in the country must present a negative COVID-19 test result upon arrival; the test must be no more than 96 hours before arrival. Inbound foreign travelers must reserve accommodations at approved accommodations; split stay between facilities must be approved by the Ministry of Tourism at least two days before departure. Transit passengers are free to move in public. While there is no mandatory quarantine for asymptomatic travelers, all persons entering the country must submit an online health declaration via the “Imuga” portal within 24 hours before travel. Authorities require non-tourist international arrivals and some domestic travelers to undergo a 10-day home quarantine. Officials may modify regulations based on a passenger’s nationality and travel history, and authorities could suspend international travel at short notice. Resorts and approved guesthouses are open; however, officials may enforce temporary movement restrictions at such sites in the event of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases. Authorities have advised Maldivian citizens to refrain from all nonessential international travel.

All entrants must register online before arrival and produce negative RT-PCR test results for COVID-19 taken within 96 hours prior to departure. Tourists are exempt from quarantine. Asymptomatic entrants with history of recovery from COVID-19 infection may avail testing and quarantine exemptions. Effective Dec. 20, returning Maldivians and work visa holders arriving at Male city are also not required to quarantine if holding negative COVID-19 test results; however, they will be advised to self-isolate at home for 10 days after arrival. Other categories, such as non-tourist foreign arrivals and those arriving at areas outside Male, must undergo a 10-day home quarantine. Any person staying for over 48 hours in the Greater Male region requires a pre-departure COVID-19 test within 72 hours before leaving the Maldives.


MDTI-WA-2020-1110
Date: 18 December 2020

UNITED KINGDOM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 18, 2020

Authorities in the UK are maintaining international entry restrictions as of Dec. 17 as part of efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Effective 0400 Dec. 19, travelers from Namibia, Uruguay, and the US Virgin Islands will need to self-isolate for 10 days after their arrival in the UK.

More than 70 countries and overseas territories – including Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Norway, and South Korea – are currently on the UK’s Travel Corridor List. Travelers arriving from listed locations are exempt from the self-isolation requirement upon arrival provided they have not traveled to an unlisted country within the previous 10 days.

International passengers of any nationality arriving from or who, within the previous 10 days, have been in locations not on the Travel Corridor List must self-isolate for up to 10 days upon entry into the UK. The exact duration of self-isolation depends upon when the traveler last departed a non-exempted destination. Health officials could perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodations are required to stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. Freight drivers and healthcare workers are typically exempt from the requirement. All international travelers entering the UK must also fill out a passenger locator form providing contact details and their travel history over the previous 10 days.

Travelers arriving from or who have been in countries with elevated disease activity can, however, reduce the required self-isolation period by taking a COVID-19 test at their own expense. Such individuals may be released from self-isolation upon receipt of a negative result. Nevertheless, travelers are not allowed to take the test until five full days have elapsed since the time they last left a location not on the Travel Corridor List; test results may take up to 48 hours to return.

Senior executives, or individuals with senior managerial responsibility in a business organization, are exempt from quarantine requirements. The executives, whether visiting or returning, must be engaged in specific business activities that deliver a significant benefit to the UK economy, including those that create or preserve 50 or more jobs in the UK, or purchase goods or services for at least 100 million GBP (134 million USD) from a UK-based business with at least 50 employees. Senior executives, as well as aerospace engineers, data infrastructure maintenance personnel, elite athletes, journalists, IT workers, and seasonal agricultural workers, will no longer need to self-isolate upon entering the country.


MDTI-WA-2020-1109
Date: 18 December 2020

POLAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 18, 2020

Authorities are maintaining international entry restrictions as of Dec. 17. Citizens and residents of EEA member states, as well as those of Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and Tunisia, are permitted to enter without restriction. Persons entering Poland from elsewhere, as well as individuals who have been close to people infected with COVID-19 or who live with a person who is self-isolating, must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Entry restrictions for most foreign nationals remain in place, except for the following:
– Spouses, children, or dependents of Polish or EEA citizens
– Foreigners who hold a Polish identity card (Karta Polaka)
– Foreigners who are permanent or temporary residents of Poland
– Students enrolled in Polish educational institutions
– Scientists who are conducting research or developmental work in Poland
– Foreigners with valid work visas

Poland has banned international flights connecting with several countries experiencing high COVID-19 activity. The list of such locations includes Armenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Georgia, Jordan, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia, and the US (other than connections to airports in the states of Illinois and New York). Entry restrictions remain in force on the land borders with Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine; however, some border crossings remain open.


MDTI-WA-2020-1108
Date: 18 December 2020

IRELAND – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 18, 2020

Authorities are maintaining international entry restrictions. Travelers from EU-designated areas of low COVID-19 activity (Green regions) will not need to self isolate; travelers from areas of medium COVID-19 activity (Amber regions) or areas of high COVID-19 activity (Red regions) will need to self-isolate for 14 days, which can be curtailed if they can produce a negative COVID-19 test result after five days. This requirement to self-isolate can be avoided for travelers from Amber regions if they are able to produce a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within the three days prior to travel. Freight transport workers, maritime employees, aircraft pilots, and individuals traveling for an imperative business or family reason are exempt from these measures. All arrivals must fill out a passenger locator form indicating the address where they will be staying.


MDTI-WA-2020-1107
Date: 18 December 2020

BELGIUM – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 18, 2020

Authorities in Belgium previously updated the country’s international entry restrictions related to COVID-19. The government has designated certain locations with high COVID-19 activity as “red zones.” Travel with red zone countries is either strongly discouraged or prohibited. Most travelers entering from red zones must take a COVID-19 test on arrival and self-quarantine for up to seven days after which a second test may be taken. If this test returns positive, the self-quarantine period is extended by another seven days. Individuals who stay in a red zone location for less than 48 hours are exempt from this measure. As of Dec. 16, the red zone includes most nations worldwide except Ireland, Iceland, areas of Norway outside Oslo and Innlandet County, Rwanda, and South Korea.

Authorities have permitted travel to resume with EU and Schengen Area countries, as well as the UK, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand Tunisia, and Uruguay, though in many cases travel is strongly discouraged. Most nonessential travel from other countries remains prohibited, with some exceptions such as diplomats, health workers, and cargo transport staff; all such arrivals will require testing and seven days of self-isolation. National authorities require all international arrivals to fill out a Passenger Locator Form 48 hours before arrival. Individuals staying in Belgium for less than 48 hours and Belgian residents traveling abroad for less than 48 hours are not required to fill out the form.


MDTI-WA-2020-1106
Date: 17 December 2020

CHILE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 17, 2020

As of Dec. 16, officials in Chile have amended national and local restrictions put in place to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Specific measures vary by location and intensity based on local disease activity. A multiphase quarantine system remains in effect. In areas under Phase-1 quarantines, all individuals must remain in their homes every day unless they possess a safe-conduct pass. For those under Phase-2 quarantines, individuals must stay in their homes during weekends and holidays unless they have a safe-conduct pass. Some locations have advanced to Phase 3 or 4 with no quarantine mandates; in these areas, authorities continue to enforce nationwide restrictions and nonquarantine orders, such as capacity limits in businesses and school closures. Persons in areas under Phase-1 and Phase-2 quarantine orders cannot travel to other regions in the country. Those in areas not under quarantine orders may not enter areas that are subject to quarantines.

Those traveling to the country must fill out a health questionnaire before departure. Nonresident foreigners must present negative results from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure and purchase a health insurance policy that will cover at least USD 30,000 of COVID-19-related medical costs in Chile.

Chilean citizens and residents may enter without taking a PCR test but must quarantine for 14 days if they do so. All persons must fill out a form reporting on their health daily for their first 14 days in Chile. Until further notice, Arturo Merino Benitez International Airport (SCL) in Santiago will be the only airport accepting foreign nationals arriving from abroad.


MDTI-WA-2020-1105
Date: 17 December 2020

COSTA RICA – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 17, 2020

Foreign travelers are no longer required to provide a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test prior to entering the country. All travelers must still complete the required health affidavit and have sufficient insurance to cover lodging and health expenses. All nonresident foreign nationals, regardless of their origin country, are allowed to enter Costa Rica.

Facemasks are required at all times while traveling. Ground and maritime borders remain closed for nonresident foreign nationals until further notice. This measure does not affect cargo transport. Nationwide, all persons must wear protective facemasks that cover the nose and mouth while in indoor public areas or using public transportation.


MDTI-WA-2020-1104
Date: 17 December 2020

NORWAY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 17, 2020

All EU and Schengen Area countries, along with the UK, remain designated as high-risk (red level), excluding Greenland, the Faroe Islands, and Ostrobothnia region and Ita-Savo Hospital District in Finland, which are designated as moderate-risk (yellow level) locations. Those arriving from red locations must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a test taken no more than 72 hours before entry; persons without such tests may be refused entry. Norwegian citizens and residents, as well as persons who come from Finland and Sweden regularly for work, are exempt from this requirement. Travelers from high-risk areas must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. Travelers who do not have permanent residence in the country or a suitable place of residence upon arrival can stay in a hotel of their choice, providing they can document their self-isolation in accordance with official regulations; otherwise, they must stay in government-designated quarantine hotels. This also applies to persons traveling to visit relatives in Norway. Travelers arriving from moderate-risk locations are not required to self-isolate.

Travelers from most other countries are currently prohibited from entering Norway. Individuals with close family in Norway or who have been granted permits to work or study in the country are exempt from the travel ban but must meet the same entry requirements as those traveling from a high-risk location. Authorities continue to advise against nonessential travel abroad.


MDTI-WA-2020-1103
Date: 17 December 2020

USA – UPDATED COVID 19 RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 17, 2020

New York: Authorities in New York State have tightened certain restrictions in New York City effective Dec. 14, while updating the state’s micro-cluster zone metrics as part of their efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Under the current measures, incoming travelers who have spent over 24 hours in another state or in a country categorized at Level 2, 3, or 4 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. However, travelers who have tested negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours prior to their arrival in New York may enter three days of quarantine and take a second test on day four. If the second test is negative, the individual may exit quarantine.

Travelers who were out of New York State for less than 24 hours are exempt from the quarantine requirement; however, such individuals must take a test 96 hours after returning to the state. All arriving travelers are required to fill out a Traveler Health Form. Persons who do not fill out the form are subject to a fine and possible quarantine. All travelers, except those traveling by air, fill out an online form. Air passengers fill out a form at the airport. Travelers from the neighboring states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont, as well as essential workers, are exempt from all these requirements.

Travelers from countries categorized at Level 1 by the CDC are not subject to the quarantine or testing requirements. As of Dec. 14, there are 49 countries and territories at Level 1, including Australia, China, Ivory Coast, New Zealand, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Nevada: Authorities in Nevada have extended their current statewide restrictions on gatherings and certain business operations through at least Jan. 15 to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Under the new directives, private gatherings are limited to 10 people from a maximum of two households, while public gatherings are capped at 25-percent of the venue’s capacity or a maximum of 50 people. Individuals over the age of nine must wear protective facemasks in all indoor or outdoor settings, whenever individuals from other households are around. All businesses must comply with social distancing standards and enhanced hygienic procedures. Businesses are responsible for ensuring all customers adhere to the requirements. Employers are also required to ensure that workers who directly interact with customers wear protective face coverings at all times. Moreover, companies are encouraged to allow employees to work from home whenever possible, resume operations in stages, and close common areas.

Idaho: As of Dec. 15, authorities in Idaho plan to keep the state’s current slate of coronavirus (COVID-19)-related restrictions in place until further notice. Idaho remains under a modified Stage 2 of its economic recovery plan due to increased disease activity. Moreover, Governor Brad Little has activated an additional 150 National Guard troops to assist in the state’s response, primarily by providing mobile testing support, decontaminating medical facilities, and participating in planning and logistics tasks. The move brings the number of guardsmen deployed in support roles to 250.

Under the current directives, gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited, except for religious ceremonies and political activities. In all cases, participants must adhere to social distancing guidelines. Residents with higher health risks should isolate at home, and all workers are encouraged to work from home whenever possible. Restaurants, bars, and nightclubs can continue operating provided all patrons are seated and tables are set at least 1.8 meters (six feet) away from each other. Facemasks are only required at long-term care facilities, although authorities urge all residents to wear them while in public.

Connecticut: As of Dec. 15, the slate of coronavirus (COVID-19)-related travel and business restrictions in effect in Connecticut remain unchanged as compared with mid-November. The list of states and territories from which travelers are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine upon arrival continues to include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, US Virgin Islands, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Authorities have also issued a statewide advisory, recommending individuals to limit all nonessential trips outside of their homes 2200-0500. Additionally, officials in Connecticut maintain a three-tier COVID-19 Alert Map to recommend specific actions for municipalities with higher rates of COVID-19 infections. The map goes from yellow, the lowest risk level, to red, the highest risk level.


MDTI-WA-2020-1102
Date: 16 December 2020

MEXICO- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

Authorities in Mexico City have increased coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-related restrictions effective Dec. 14. Under the new directives, non-essential businesses, including restaurants and retail stores, must close at 1700. Restaurants may operate on a carryout basis only and sales of street food are prohibited. In addition, vehicular traffic through the Historic District of the city will be heavily restricted, with a number of roads being closed. Residents are also urged to stay at home and wear facemasks in public.

Mexico’s land border with the US will remain closed to all nonessential travel through at least Dec. 21. The ban on recreational boat travel will also remain in effect. These measures have been in place since March under a mutual agreement between the two countries. Cargo transport between Mexico and the US is exempt. Officials in Mexico continue to advise residents to avoid all international travel.


MDTI-WA-2020-1101
Date: 16 December 2020

SOUTH AFRICA- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

No new restrictions have been imposed on international travel. Three international airports are open for the entry and departure of foreign travelers, namely O.R. Tambo (JNB), Cape Town International (CPT), and King Shaka International Airport (DUR). Effective Nov. 12, 18 land ports of entry are fully operational; however, 35 border posts remain closed due to insufficient capacity for screening, testing, and quarantine. Small-craft passenger maritime travel is allowed to resume; however, the government continues to ban all cruise ships from docking. Those entering South Africa will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival in the country.

All travelers will be screened upon arrival. Those showing symptoms of COVID-19 will be required to take a test. Travelers who test positive will be subject to mandatory quarantine for up to 10 days at a designated facility. Authorities also require proof of accommodation, should they need to self-quarantine at the time of arrival in the country. Travelers departing South Africa will be subject to screening. Those found to have had COVID-19 may be subject to further testing. The outcome of the test will determine whether or not the person may depart the country, as determined by the Director-General of Health or a delegated person. Travelers testing positive will need to self-isolate; this may be done at one’s private residence.


MDTI-WA-2020-1100
Date: 16 December 2020

LUXEMBOURG- UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

Authorities in Luxembourg are maintaining measures introduced to combat the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Dec. 15. There are no entry restrictions on travelers from countries within the European Union or Schengen Area, the UK, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and Vatican City. Moreover, residents of Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay are also permitted to enter the country. Most travelers from other countries remain prohibited from entry. Exceptions are in place for essential work, study, and family reasons; all such individuals arriving via air require evidence of having tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours prior to departing for Luxembourg.


MDTI-WA-2020-1099
Date: 16 December 2020

TURKEY – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

Authorities have lifted many travel restrictions, including the nation’s intercity travel ban. Intercity rail travel has resumed on most major routes. International travel is allowed; Turkey’s air, land, and sea borders have reopened for most travelers. However, nonessential travel with Iran and Iraq remains suspended. All travelers are required to undergo a health screening on arrival. Individuals displaying symptoms must submit to a COVID-19 test and undergo quarantine if positive; the traveler must pay all costs related to testing and quarantine. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen, provided certain hygiene measures are implemented.


MDTI-WA-2020-1098
Date: 16 December 2020

FRANCE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

International travel restrictions on most foreign nationals remain in effect. International arrivals from the European Economic Area (EEA), as well as Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, and the UK, are permitted to enter without restriction. Most travelers from other locations remain barred from entry, though exceptions are made for French nationals and residents, as well as for persons traveling on what authorities deem to be essential reasons, including certain necessary workers, diplomats, students, and those visiting for urgent family reasons. All such arrivals are required to complete a form declaring themselves to be COVID-19 free and present a certificate declaring their reason for travel.

Permitted travelers arriving from Algeria, Bahrain, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ecuador, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, Morocco, Panama, South Africa, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, the US, and Zimbabwe must present proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours prior to boarding. Permitted arrivals from other countries must meet the same condition, take a test on arrival and self-isolate until the result is known, or self-isolate for 14 days.


MDTI-WA-2020-1097
Date: 16 December 2020

SINGAPORE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

Officials continue to ban the entry of short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who do not provide essential services, with exceptions. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling to Singapore. Incoming passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. Foreign nationals traveling from most locations must test negative for COVID-19 not more than 72 hours before the trip. While foreigners traveling from locations that officials consider to be lower-risk do not need to take tests in advance, officials require these passengers to undergo tests upon arrival in Singapore.

Arrivals from most locations must serve their SHN for 14 days at government-designated premises. Travelers who spent the previous two weeks in mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan can serve a seven-day SHN in their residences. Arrivals from Fiji, Finland, Hong Kong, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Turkey can serve SHN at their residence for two weeks if they fulfill specific requirements. The travelers must have spent the previous 14 days in the aforementioned locations and must serve their SHN at the accommodation alone or with other travelers with the same travel history.

Authorities will allow entry for all travelers from Taiwan from Dec. 18. The same policy is in place for arrivals from Australia, Brunei, mainland China, New Zealand, and Vietnam. The passengers must have remained in the mentioned locations for the last 14 days before entry, register online on the Safe Travel portal at least one week before entry, and self-isolate until results of an on-arrival test are ready. Travelers who test negative are exempt from the typical compulsory SHN requirement for arrivals, though they must still use the TraceTogether application for contact tracing purposes.

Arrangements for cross-border business and official travels are in place with Brunei, Germany, Indonesia, and South Korea, as well as Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces and Chongqing, Shanghai, and Tianjin municipalities in mainland China. Travelers entering Singapore under the programs must have a sponsoring Singaporean government agency or company, seek prior approval from Singaporean authorities, and test negative for COVID-19 within 48-72 hours before departure. Travelers must test for COVID-19 again upon arrival, remain at their accommodation until the test returns negative, and adhere to controlled itineraries for the first 14 days of their visit.


MDTI-WA-2020-1096
Date: 16 December 2020

CHILE – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

As of Dec. 14, officials in Chile have amended national and local restrictions put in place to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Specific measures imposed vary by location and intensity based on local disease activity. A multiphase quarantine system remains in effect. In areas under Phase-1 quarantines, all individuals must remain in their homes every day unless they possess a safe-conduct pass. For those under Phase-2 quarantines, individuals must stay in their homes during weekends and holidays unless they possess a safe-conduct pass. Some locations have advanced to Phase 3 or Phase 4, under which there are no quarantine mandates; in these areas, nationwide restrictions remain in effect and nonquarantine orders, such as capacity limits in businesses and school closures, continue to be enforced. Persons in areas under Phase-1 and Phase-2 quarantine orders are not permitted to travel to other regions in the country, and those in areas not under quarantine orders may not enter regions that are subject to quarantines.

Those traveling to the country must fill out a health questionnaire before departure. Nonresident foreigners must present negative results from a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before departure and purchase a health insurance policy that will cover at least USD 30,000 of COVID-19-related medical costs in Chile.

Chilean citizens and residents may enter without taking a PCR test but must quarantine for 14 days if they do so. All persons must fill out a form reporting on their health daily for their first 14 days in Chile. Until further notice, Arturo Merino Benitez International Airport (SCL) in Santiago will be the only airport accepting foreign nationals arriving from abroad.


MDTI-WA-2020-1095
Date: 16 December 2020

BRAZIL – UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

Authorities in Brazil will likely maintain most of the government’s existing restrictions aimed at curbing the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) through at least Dec. 31. Nonresident foreign nationals remain prohibited from entering the country by land and water, except as specified otherwise. Brazilian citizens, permanent residents, and their immediate family members, as well as foreign residents working for international organizations or foreign governments, or who are traveling for trade or humanitarian purposes, are exempt from the ban. The ban is currently slated to expire Dec. 16; however, authorities have typically extended it for 30 days upon each expiration date.

Apart from the overarching land border closures and as part of a joint agreement, the land border crossings with Paraguay – specifically at Foz do Iguacu, Ponta Pora, and Mundo Novo – are open. Foreign citizens are allowed to enter Brazil by air for visits of no longer than 90 days; travelers no longer need to provide proof of health insurance to enter the country.


MDTI-WA-2020-1094
Date: 16 December 2020

ISRAEL– UPDATED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS AS OF DECEMBER 16, 2020

Health officials in Israel reduced the nation’s mandatory coronavirus (COVID-19) quarantine period to 10 days effective 0800 Dec. 15 for persons in isolation who test negative for the virus twice. The first COVID-19 test must be taken at the start of the isolation period with the second being performed on the ninth day from the date of exposure to the virus; the two tests must be administered no less than 24 hours apart. The original quarantine period for travelers entering Israel and for Israelis exposed to confirmed COVID-19 carriers was 14 days. However, in November, health officials shortened the quarantine period from 14 to 12 days, contingent upon two negative COVID-19 tests.

The tourist areas of Eilat along the Red Sea and Ein Bokek along the Dead Sea have reopened to domestic travelers. Hotels, restaurants, strip malls, zoos, and other attractions in these areas have resumed operations. All visitors to these areas must present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival; local residents and workers must present a negative COVID-19 test taken within a week of entry or undergo a free, rapid test at one of the city’s entrances. Other tourist sites throughout the country will remain closed until further notice.


About Us

Marsman Drysdale Travel Inc. (MARSMAN DRYSDALE TRAVEL INC. ) is one of the companies under the Marsman-Drysdale Group and is the leading travel and tour company in the Philippines.

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